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Guided Reading: How to Organize the Chaos Guided reading has become increasingly popular, and for good reason; it works. The opportunity to work with children in small groups, instruct in a way that’s laser focused on students’ level of development, and directly address individual challenges allows educators to go beyond one-size-fits-all teaching approaches and set a more solid foundation for overall literacy. While most educators have a grasp on the fundamentals of guided reading, successful implementation presents unique challenges such as group management, differentiating lessons for students, finding on-level books and designing materials for stations to address students needs.

100 English Synonyms to Expand Your Vocabulary – Espresso English A synonym is a word with the same or a similar meaning as another word. For example, the words big and large are synonyms. Buy and purchase are also synonyms – although we tend to use “buy” in a more informal context, and “purchase” in a more formal context.

Fiction Archives Our privacy promise The New Yorker's Strongbox is designed to let you communicate with our writers and editors with greater anonymity and security than afforded by conventional e-mail. When you visit or use our public Strongbox server at The New Yorker and our parent company, Condé Nast, will not record your I.P. address or information about your browser, computer, or operating system, nor will we embed third-party content or deliver cookies to your browser. Strongbox servers are under the physical control of The New Yorker and Condé Nast. Strongbox is designed to be accessed only through a “hidden service” on the Tor anonymity network, which is set up to conceal both your online and physical location from us and to offer full end-to-end encryption for your communications with us.

Read Across America: Reading and Seuss-Themed Resources for Teachers Editor's Note: This year, Read Across America day is Monday, March 3rd -- a day later than usual. We published this reading-themed blog last year for Read Across America and Dr. Seuss's birthday, and it was a huge hit with readers. This year, we've updated the post to include a few new resources. (Updated 02/2014) Six Amazing Websites that Make Your Writing Stronger Long writing activities are not very frequently done in class. I tend to think that my students are like me; I need the right kind of atmosphere. Writing requires time, silence and lots of inspiration. Ideally, at this time of the year, I would probably wish to be sitting next to a fireplace with the most perfect instagrammable snow falling outside my window while drinking a nice cup of coffee waiting for inspiration to strike. Unfortunately, there isn’t any snow where I live so I’ll have to make do with a bit of rain and some reddish trees. Note: you won’t find “instagrammable” in the dictionary

Owl Eyes Offers a Good Way to Guide Students Through Classic Literature Owl Eyes is a relatively new tool that provides teachers with a good way to provide students with guidance while they are reading classic literature. Owl Eyes provides teachers with tools to insert annotations and questions into classic literature. Students can see the annotations and questions that their teachers add to the digital text.

Reading Planet Tony DiTerlizzi - Illustrator Tony DiTerlizzi is the illustrator of the Caldecott Honor Book The Spider and the Fly and the coauthor and illustrator of the best-selling The Spiderwick Chronicles. He grew up in an artistic household in South Florida and quickly gravitated toward fantasy and whimsical stories. In addition to writing and illustrating children’s books, he has also worked in gaming. How British English and American English are Different Many Americans who love tea would turn up their noses at the idea of adding milk to it. Brits, on the other hand, are known for lacing their strong tea with milk. With or without milk, tea is tea. It’s served one way in Britain and another way in the United States, but everyone can recognize it for what it is. The language that Americans and Brits share is a bit like that—spoken differently in the two locations, but understandable by both groups of speakers.

Very Short Stories For High School & Middle School If your students are struggling to get into the short story, or you're pressed for time, here are some very brief stories to get you started. They're not as short as Hemingway's famous six-word story (For sale: baby shoes, never worn.), but they're manageable even for reluctant readers. Most are under 2,000 words; I've included an approximate word count where I could. These stories offer a complete reading experience with great economy of words.

Between the Lions BETWEEN THE LIONS is produced by WGBH Boston, Sirius Thinking, Ltd., and Mississippi Public Broadcasting, and is funded in part bythe Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the U.S. Department of Education's Ready To Learn program, and by the Barksdale Reading Institute. The contents of this Web site were developed under a cooperative agreement, #PRU295A050003, from the U.S. Department of Education. However, thosecontents do not necessarily represent the policy of the Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. British English and American English British English and American English British people and American people can always understand each other – but there are a few notable differences between British English and American English Grammar Americans use the present perfect tense less than speakers of British English and a British teacher might mark wrong some things that an American teacher would say are correct. US Did you do your homework yet? Brit.

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