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Epic Fail or Win? Gamifying Learning in My Classroom

Epic Fail or Win? Gamifying Learning in My Classroom
Every week for 17 years, I've heard my students ask, "What do I need to do to get an A?" Historically, many have focused on their grade rather than on fundamental skills. My attempt to change this mindset started two years ago when I gamified learning in my classes. After researching gamification and its potential to help students master skills and processes, I used the 3DGameLab and then Gradecraft to develop and implement game-based learning. In each class, students could choose "quests" that, if completed successfully, earned them badges and experience points. Each open-source badge was developed using Badg.us so that students could take them into the digital universe (e.g. attach to resumes, ePortfolios, etc.) and -- unlike grades on a transcript -- document skills they've mastered. Steps to Gamify Learning 1. Using gamification software alleviates the time it takes to build quests, award points, and track progress. 2. 3. 4. Build choice into the gaming structure. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/epic-fail-win-gamifying-learning-liz-kolb

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Horse race dictation It is enjoyable because students are asked to predict the first word, in the same way people try to guess which horse will come first in a race, giving a strong motivation for the short but very intensive listening activity, in the form of a horse race commentary, which gives the solution. PreparationChoose a sentence and write words in random order on the left of the board, as in the example below. You also need to prepare a commentary, which should be challenging enough to make it interesting but not too difficult. In the example below there is only one major change in order, when, and other minor changes during the race. finallywaso’clockelevenhomewhenIitgot Example commentaryThey’re off!

A Guide to Game-Based Learning You want students to learn. Shall we play a game? Absolutely! But what is a game? Whatever happened to gamification? It wasn’t long ago that leading experts were making a big fuss about it. In 2012, Gartner, for instance, predicted that by today the use of gamified services for consumer goods marketing and customer retention would become as important as Facebook. The research house also forecast that more than 70% of Global 2000 organisations would have at least one gamified application by 2015, and that the gamification industry would be worth US$2.8 billion by 2016. 6 Factors Of Classroom Gamification 6 Factors Of Classroom Gamification by Nellie Mitchell I was 11 the year my summer camp director transformed the regular schedule, procedures, and lingo that we were used to—into the most memorable, enriching experience I had ever encountered at that point in my life. I had no idea that he had ‘gamified’ the week; I just knew that it was the best summer ever. Instead of grouping us by numbers, we were named after the Greek alphabet. We competed daily against the other groups in volleyball, softball, kickball, and on the final night —a chariot and Olympic flame opened an epic Olympic Game contest at midnight.

Exploring the Educational Potential of Video Game-Based Learning: A Few Moments with Kurt Squire When Kurt Squire first began studying video games, learning and cognition from a socio-cultural perspective in the late '90s, the field was still in its infancy. Fast forward to 2011, and Squire is considered a leading scholar in the burgeoning area of video game-based learning. He is perhaps most notably known for his extensive examination of Civilization III for which he designed a game-based learning program to study students’ learning in the classroom. As director of the Games, Learning and Society Initiative at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, he spends his time researching the civic potential of video games and the broader impact they have on the educational sphere.

Alphabet Soup Game - Build words from missing letters! Begin Game! alphabet-soup con__ve!@#$@!concave;connive$%^%$p_a_t! 12 Puzzle and Quiz Creation Tools for Teachers There are many different sites on the internet that allow you to create your own puzzles and games to use either directly in class, or which can be linked to/embedded into your VLE. I’ve been doing some trawling ahead of a training session I am running soon, and here are a few of the best ones that I’ve found. There are others out there, but the focus specifically for my session was KS4 and 5, so these links are aimed at older students. If you have any other favourites, please add them to the comments!

Does gamification play Pavlov with learners? DOs & DON'Ts The massive success of online games led many to suggest that games and gamification, could be used to turbo-charge online learning. Take a little magic dust from gaming, sprinkle generously and we’ll all find it more fun, be more motivated and learn to love learning. But there’s pros and cons here, as it can both help and hinder learning. If gamification is simply scoring, bonuses and badges, the 21st century version of Pavlov's dogs, that would be a disappointment. The simple stimuli, scores and rewards may keep learners going forward but it can be a distractive, disappointing and shallow form of engagement, skating across the surface of content. It may also demand more cognitive effort for not much gain.

How Games Naturally Promote A Growth Mindset How Games Naturally Promote A Growth Mindset by Mary Wissinger Let’s face it: our students are playing games. Video Games For Grown-ups The office of Funomena, a small video-game company based in San Francisco's SOMA district, has all the creativity-enhancing knickknacks you expect in a Bay Area startup: clumps of clay, hydrophilic sand, a Lego mermaid, and what cofounder Robin Hunicke describes as other "stupid things we fiddle with." The idea is to set an atmosphere that's "more like a Montessori school than a game development studio," she says. Which Word Game - Pick the right word to fit the context I * to go to a private school, but I don't any more.!@#$@! "Used to" is the correct phrase. !@#$@!

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