background preloader

Learning the shell.

Learning the shell.

Rii Touch | The Premier Class of Mini Wireless Keyboards Top things to do after installing Ubuntu Linux 9.10 Karmic Koala See the new version: Ubuntu 10.04 Post-Install Guide: What to do and try after installing Lucid Lynx! So you've just installed Ubuntu 9.10, the cute and cuddly Karmic Koala, but now you're confronted with a most pertinent question, "What do i do now?" Ubuntu is a very complete and full-featured Linux distribution, but no operating system can come with everything you want. There's much more fun to be had in what comes after installing the OS on your machine: now you get to set it up with all the best software it didn't already come with! Basic Stuff Download Mirror & Updates After every major Ubuntu release (beta, release candidate, and especially the final), the official servers will be unbearably sluggish. Optionally, jump to the "Updates" tab. Before you go, head over to the "Statistics" tab and check it if it isn't already. When you click close, you will likely be prompted to reload the list of available software. Click here to install or use the following command: Time Synchronization

Blog Archive » 7 Cool Things to Do With Linux So you’ve taken the plunge and installed Linux. You’ve followed all the HOWTOs all over the net. You’ve got your wireless card working flawlessly. You’ve got your video card working (and you’ve begun to loathe that spinning cube). You’ve installed all the “restricted” software like Adobe Flash, Sun Java and Google Earth. You’ve got all the patent restricted codecs and even DVD playback working just like you want. Use Your computer as a Home Theater PC. 9 of the Best Free Java Books Java is a general-purpose, concurrent, class-based, object-oriented, high-level programming language and computing platform first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995. It is related in some ways to C and C++, in particular with regard to its syntax, and borrows a few ideas from other languages. Java is designed to be simple enough that many programmers can quickly become proficient in the language. It is one of the most popular programming languages in use, especially for client-server web applications. Some popularity indexes show that Java holds the top spot with C. This programming language is the underlying technology that powers utilities, games, business applications, and other software. The focus of this article is to select some of the finest Java books which help programmers master all aspects of this language. To cater for all tastes, we have chosen a good range of books. Next Section: 9 of the Best Free Java Books - Page 2 This article is divided into three pages:

Linux Toolkit - A Tool 2 Cool 4 U Linux Toolbox Back to Contents Ah, the Linux Toolbox. Remember the Acme Toolkit? nc (netcat) Yup, the ol' tried and true swiss army knife of networking - netcat. cryptcat Well, improving upon netcat we have cryptcat. stunnel Very similar to netcat and cryptcat, but stunnel uses SSL to encrypt the data. OpenSSH Hopefully no one is using Telnet anymore. nmap Another classic from days past . . . nmap (Network Mapper). Cheops Another very cool tool for mapping networks. dsniff A very sick collection of tools for network auditing and pen-testing (and a favorite among those rogue employees!). Firewalk Firewalk is a useful tool for assisting in the determination of ACLs on network gateways and in mapping networks. hping A very cool TCP/IP packet assembler & analyzer. HUNT HUNT is another questionable tool. nemesis Nemesis is a tool useful for pen-testing as well as a low level learning aid. Nessus Nessus is one of my personal very favorite open source tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Through the Interface: Creating a face-recognising security cam with a Raspberry Pi Part 1 This series of posts builds upon the mini-series on building a motion-detecting security cam based around the Raspberry Pi. Once you have your motion detecting security cam up and running, you should be able to move on to the next stage: enabling that system to recognize faces that it has been trained against. My specific project (which I’m calling the Facecam, although I haven’t applied for a trademark ;-) pulls data down from Facebook and uses that to train the face recognition system, but that’s far from being a requirement: it’s also very possible to train the database in other ways. We’ll go into detail on the various parts over the coming weeks (probably once a week, as I want to continue blogging about other topics, too), but let’s start by introducing the project and the system architecture. A lot of this is clearly contingent on the accuracy of the facial recognition system – something we’ll look at much more closely later on. Right, now let’s dive into the system architecture.

Scripting, Part Two: Looping for Fun and Profit Crafty System Administrators who want to conserve energy need to learn the fine art of looping. You energy-conserving* system administrators will enjoy learning to use loops in your scripts. Looping is a technique that allows you to repeat a process or set of commands indefintely or until the loop exhausts a particular list of items. For example, you want to copy a particular file to everyone’s home directory. How do you do it? Don’t say that you have a junior-level administrator do it. Don’t worry if you aren’t a scripting master, I’m going to take it slow through this series so that you can absorb what’s going on. The Basics You need access to a Linux system and last week’s post, “Scripting, Part One”. The Lively Loop There’s nothing particularly special about a loop. My original example is a good one. First, look at what’s needed to make this happen: a list of users, the file in question, and, depending on the file’s purpose, an optional permissions change. #! #! root@aspen:~# . #!

netfilter/iptables project homepage - The netfilter.org project Math ∩ Programming | A place for elegant solutions Linux: Install a million games in one click! Linux: Install a million games in one click! Updated: December 16, 2009 Well, not really a million, but how about tens or hundreds? Good enough for you? Today, we will talk about two extremely useful applications that allow to you search for hundreds of games that run on Linux, sorted by category, popularity, license, or price, read game synopses, check out the screenshots, and then, should you decide that you like some of them, install them with a single mouse click. Do you know what this means? djl homepage djl is an open-source game manager for Linux, written in Python and inspired by Steam Valve for Windows. Get djl The first thing you will have to do is download the installer script from the website. tar zxvf <archive-name> cd <extracted-archive-dir> chmod +x djl.sh . When you run the script the first time, if you do not have the Python framework installed, you'll get an error. Run djl Once you have everything in place, run the application. Using djl Now comes the really cool part. Plugins

Related:  PEARLTREE5Computer ScienceProgramaçãolinuxtoolsscriptingLinuxShell ScriptComputinglinuxshellComputerlinuxLinuxnecrodiashell