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Hackerspace

Hackerspace
Activities[edit] Many hackerspaces participate in the use and development of free software, open hardware, and alternative media. They are often physically located in infoshops, social centers, adult education centers, public schools, public libraries or on university campuses, but may relocate to industrial or warehouse space when they need more room. Hackerspaces with open membership became common within Germany in the 90s in the orbit of the German Chaos Computer Club, with the C-base being probably the most impressive example. The concept however was limited to less than a dozen of spaces within Germany, and did not spread beyond borders at first. Most likely this was because initial founding costs were prohibitive for small groups without the support of a large organization like the CCC. In 2006, Paul Bohm came up with a fundraising strategy based on the Street Performer Protocol to build Metalab in Vienna, Austria, and became its founding director. Facilities[edit] Organization[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hackerspace

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HackerspaceWiki Hackerspaces are community-operated physical places, where people can meet and work on their projects. This website is for Anyone and Everyone who wants to share their hackerspace stories and questions with the global hackerspaces community. Regular Events Call-in - Call-ins provide an opportunity for existing hackerspaces to provide an update and highlight upcoming events, and new/planned hackerspaces can ask questions. First Sunday each month. Starting a Makerspace on a Budget? Here's The Equipment You'll Need Most of the things that involve computers are solitary endeavors. Writing. Programming. Building electronics projects. It’s not unheard of for creative-minded geeks to lock themselves away for days at a time, isolated from the world, and hack away on their projects.

Open-source hardware Open source hardware consists of physical artifacts of technology designed and offered by the open design movement. Both free and open source software (FOSS) as well as open source hardware is created by this open source culture movement and applies a like concept to a variety of components. The term usually means that information about the hardware is easily discerned. Hardware design (i.e. mechanical drawings, schematics, bills of material, PCB layout data, HDL source code and integrated circuit layout data), in addition to the software that drives the hardware, are all released with the FOSS approach. Since the rise of reconfigurable programmable logic devices, sharing of logic designs has been a form of open source hardware.

People power transforms the web in next online revolution In July 2004, US cinema advertisements for Halo 2, the science fiction computer game, briefly carried the address for a website - ilovebees.com - which appeared to belong to a beekeeper who had mysteriously disappeared. Her honey-based recipes had been replaced by an apparently random list of numbers. Over four months 600,000 people joined in solving the mystery of what the numbers meant. What unfolded was a striking display of 'We Think': structured, mass collaborative creativity and intelligence. Makerspace Starter Kit Makerspace Starter Kit Congratulations! You are now the proud owner of a Makerspace. The Makerspace Starter Kit includes:Makerspace Welcome Letter (pdf)Makerspace Starter Kit (pdf)Mini Maker Notebook (pdf)

Peer production Peer production occurs in a socio-technical system which allows thousands of individuals to effectively cooperate to create a non-exclusive given outcome.[5] These collective efforts are informal. Peer production is a collaborative effort with no limit to the amount of discussion or changes that can be made to the product. However, as in the case of Wikipedia, a large amount, in fact the majority, of this collaborative effort is maintained by very few devoted and active individuals.[6] Crowdsourcing products like community cookbooks were a form of peer production. 7 Tactics for Open Innovation The last decade has seen the rise of collaboration as a by-word for innovation success. This is now often referred to as ‘open innovation’ which we define as sharing the risks and rewards of innovation with others. This may sound simple enough and yet in our experience many large organisations struggle with implementing it as open innovation is it can be highly counter-cultural and disruptive. In this short article we present seven tactics and incentives that can really help to spark open innovation success. 1.

ISTE 2015: Takeaway Tips for a Library Maker Space Maker station at the ISTE Librarians Digital Age Playground at the 2015 ISTE conference in Philadelphia. The maker movement was front and center at the 2015 ISTE conference—and that’s a good thing for me. After following maker initiatives with great interest for some time now, I have the opportunity to design a maker space this year for 6th–12th grade students at my school, Worcester (MA) Academy. A search of this year’s program at ISTE, held June 28 to July 1 in Philadelphia, using the term “constructivist learning/maker movement” resulted in 67 related sessions. The ISTE Librarians Network hosted a maker station at their Digital Age Playground and convened a panel on library maker spaces, featuring elementary and middle school librarians, a school administrator, and the coordinator of a public library maker initiative. Vendors and exhibitors demonstrated tools, lessons, and ideas for maker spaces.

Commons-based peer production Commons-based peer production is a term coined by Harvard Law School professor Yochai Benkler.[1] It describes a new model of socio-economic production in which the creative energy of large numbers of people is coordinated (usually with the aid of the Internet) into large, meaningful projects mostly without traditional hierarchical organization. These projects are often, but not always, conceived without financial compensation for contributors. The term is often used interchangeably with the term social production. Yochai Benkler contrasts commons-based peer production with firm production (in which tasks are delegated based on a central decision-making process) and market-based production (in which tagging different prices to different tasks serves as an incentive to anyone interested in performing a task). Aaron Krowne offered another definition in the Free Software Magazine:

DIY COCONUT + ROSE BODY SCRUB Few things smell better than coconut and rose so let’s combine them, shall we? In this Kitchen Beautician DIY, we’re making a “Spring Time Scrub” to help you exfoliate and get your skin super soft for the coming summer months. Bathing suit season is just around the corner and nobody wants to be the ashy girl! Here’s my new favorite way to get rid of dry skin caused by winter dryness: You’ll need: a mason jar, coconut oil, raw cane sugar, almond or jojoba oil and one fragrant rose (here I used sterling silver roses because they’re my favorite AND they’re one of the most fragrant roses ever.)

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