background preloader

Is Twitter a Complex Adaptive System

Is Twitter a Complex Adaptive System
I’ve seen a bunch of posts bubble up over the past few days that are really sparking my curiousity about what is really going on with Twitter, so I need to do a little brain dump. Bear with me. Insight #1 An article by Rosabeth Moss Kanter was just published today on the Harvard Business Review website, titled On Twitter and in the Workplace, It’s Power to the Connectors. In it, she highlights the fact that there is an organizational trend moving away from the hierarchical networks of the 20th century, and towards complex, distributed, non-hierarchical structures of business organization and leadership. She also points out that success today is based on a person’s ability to leverage power and influence within their social networks, to act as “connectors” between people and information, and in turn build social capital. She leaves the evaluation of the significance of Twitter open-ended, but she lays out a few characteristics of Twitter that I found most interesting: Insight #2 Insight #3

http://emergentbydesign.com/2009/11/17/is-twitter-a-complex-adaptive-system/

Twitter is closer to emulate a Neural Network than Facebook When we think of Twitter and the innovation behind it, the first thing we all think is 140. 140 characters is without a doubt an amazing innovation that Twitter introduced which makes communication flow faster, forces twitters to summarize a piece of news or information, or an idea or an opinion and allows followers to get information or an idea faster as well. Also, after the introduction of url shorteners (tinyurl,com originally and many others later on such as bit.ly) an emergent property of Twitter came to life: the linked web. Any blog post or news article out there could be potentially linked multiple times in Twitter with quick summaries and opinions. Other emerging properties or elements in Twitter are:. Tags, early on twitters started using tags as a way to group events or themes together and follow them separately..

Learn from your customers for usable Web apps Imagine the following scenario: You go shopping to buy a loaf of bread. The shops look gorgeous, decked out in vivid colors and stunning artwork. Trouble is, you can't always tell from the window displays what sort of products are on sale inside. Metalogue: The Evolution of Mind, Consciousness, and the Web (this is my final paper for cybernetics class and for graduate school. it is a theoretical metalogue between myself and gregory bateson. many of his phrases and passages are pulled directly from the book Steps To An Ecology of Mind) vm: i want to understand the ecology of mind, how it works. I want to understand how technology is accelerating intentional evolution, and what the Web is becoming… a collective intelligence? a global mind? a path to destruction?

Is Neuroscience the Death of Free Will? The Stone is a forum for contemporary philosophers and other thinkers on issues both timely and timeless. Is free will an illusion? Some leading scientists think so. Five frameworks to build strategies for the future of media We are big believers in the power of visual frameworks to help people understand complex landscapes and build effective strategies. One of the domains we have been applying these frameworks to is the future of media. For those who haven’t been following our work through the years, here is a collection of five frameworks we’ve created to help companies understand and act on the future of media. These are frequently used in strategy workshops, and also in more structured strategy development processes. We have also created a number of custom future of media frameworks in the course of strategy consulting projects for clients, to address the particular issues they are facing, however unfortunately we cannot share these publicly.

.Fritjof Capra Fritjof Capra (born February 1, 1939) is an Austrian-born American physicist.[1] He is a founding director of the Center for Ecoliteracy in Berkeley, California, and is on the faculty of Schumacher College. Life and work[edit] Born in Vienna, Austria, Capra attended the University of Vienna, where he earned his Ph.D. in theoretical physics in 1966. He conducted research in particle physics and systems theory at the University of Paris (1966–1968), the University of California, Santa Cruz (1968–1970), the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (1970), Imperial College, London (1971–1974) and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (1975–1988). While at Berkeley, he was a member of the Fundamental Fysiks Group, founded in May 1975 by Elizabeth Rauscher and George Weissmann, which met weekly to discuss philosophy and quantum physics.[2] He also taught at U.C.

The Neuroscience Revolution is Here: 5 Ways To Supercharge Your Brain With TechnologyTheFeelGoodLifestyle.com “The brain is the last and grandest biological frontier, the most complex thing we have yet discovered in our universe. It contains hundreds of billions of cells interlinked through trillions of connections. The brain boggles the mind.” ~James D.

Rethinking Social Networking Four years ago, Facebook had 100 million users. Today, it has close to a billion. It’s tough to remember a time when every article on the internet wasn’t covered with share buttons, or when you couldn't "like" something by clicking a little thumbs-up icon. Social networking continues to evolve rapidly, especially with the widespread adoption of smartphones and apps, but the digital dust has had a couple of years to settle on Facebook and Twitter, and people are starting to look around and reflect. What they're noticing is that these new tools – while incredibly useful for rapid-fire sharing – are constraining our identities and communication in ways we're only beginning to understand. Artist Jonathan Harris on four cultural phenomena – compression, disposability, curation, and self-promotion – that social media have amplified and accelerated.

Fritjof Capra - Resume In addition to his research in physics and systems theory, Capra has been engaged in a systematic examination of the philosophical and social implications of contemporary science for the past 35 years. His books on this subject have been acclaimed internationally, and he has lectured widely to lay and professional audiences in Europe, Asia, and North and South America. Capra is the author of several international bestsellers, including The Tao of Physics (1975), The Turning Point (1982), The Web of Life (1996), The Hidden Connections (2002), The Science of Leonardo (2007), and Learning from Leonardo (2013). He coauthored Green Politics (1984), Belonging to the Universe (1991), and EcoManagement (1993), and coedited Steering Business Toward Sustainability (1995). His most recent book, coauthored with Pier Luigi Luisi, is a multidisciplinary textbook, The Systems View of Life: A Unifying Vision (Cambridge University Press, 2014). Fritjof Capra lives in Berkeley with his wife and daughter.

Temple Grandin Early life and education[edit] Grandin was born in Boston, Massachusetts, to Eustacia Cutler and Richard Grandin. She was diagnosed with autism at the age of two in 1949. Diagnosed and labeled with brain damage, at that early age she was placed in a structured nursery school with what she considers to have been good teachers. After Grandin's mother spoke to a doctor who suggested speech therapy, she hired a nanny who spent hours playing turn-taking games with Grandin and her sister.[3] Grandin suffered from delayed speech development, as she began talking at the age of four (developmental guidelines anticipate a vocabulary of eight to ten words by eighteen months of age.[4]) She considers herself lucky to have had supportive mentors from primary school onward.

Artificial General Intelligence in Second Life  Virtual worlds are the golden path to achieving Artificial General Intelligence and positive Singularity, Dr Ben Goertzel’s, CEO of Novamente LLC and author of “The Hidden Pattern: A Patternist Philosophy of Mind” explained in his presentation “Artificial General Intelligence in Virtual Worlds” given at the Singularity Summit 2007 earlier this month. According to Goertzel, Singularity is no longer a far future idea. About a year ago Goertzel gave a talk “Ten Years to a Positive Singularity — If We Really, Really Try.” The slide that opens this post was in Goerzel’s presentation. It depicts an Archailect, Archai from the Orion’s Arm science-fiction world — a mega scale brain, “sophont or sophont cluster that has grown so vast as to become a god-like entity.” What is singularity?

Linked: The New Science of Networks by Albert-L szl Barab si at Sohodojo's RIBS Joint - Really Important Books and Stuff Top : Science and Technology : Linked: The New Science of Networks by Albert-Lszl Barabsi Note: These comments will serve as a placeholder for our review of this most important and inspiring book. Soon, we'll post our full review as this is one of the most exciting technical books we've read in many, many years. Linked: The New Science of Networks reveals powerful emerging truths about the nature of life – biological, cyber and social.

Related: