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What it means to "hold space" for people, plus eight tips on how to do it well - Heather Plett

What it means to "hold space" for people, plus eight tips on how to do it well - Heather Plett
When my mom was dying, my siblings and I gathered to be with her in her final days. None of us knew anything about supporting someone in her transition out of this life into the next, but we were pretty sure we wanted to keep her at home, so we did. While we supported mom, we were, in turn, supported by a gifted palliative care nurse, Ann, who came every few days to care for mom and to talk to us about what we could expect in the coming days. She taught us how to inject Mom with morphine when she became restless, she offered to do the difficult tasks (like giving Mom a bath), and she gave us only as much information as we needed about what to do with Mom’s body after her spirit had passed. “Take your time,” she said. “You don’t need to call the funeral home until you’re ready. Ann gave us an incredible gift in those final days. In the two years since then, I’ve often thought about Ann and the important role she played in our lives. What does it mean to hold space for someone else?

http://heatherplett.com/2015/03/hold-space/

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