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Open innovation

Open innovation
Open innovation is a term promoted by Henry Chesbrough, adjunct professor and faculty director of the Center for Open Innovation at the Haas School of Business at the University of California,[1] in a book of the same name,[2] though the idea and discussion about some consequences (especially the interfirm cooperation in R&D) date as far back as the 1960s[citation needed]. Some instances of open innovation are Open collaboration,[3] a pattern of collaboration, innovation, and production. The concept is also related to user innovation, cumulative innovation, know-how trading, mass innovation and distributed innovation. “Open innovation is a paradigm that assumes that firms can and should use external ideas as well as internal ideas, and internal and external paths to market, as the firms look to advance their technology”.[2] Alternatively, it is "innovating with partners by sharing risk and sharing reward. Advantages[edit] Disadvantages[edit] Models of open innovation[edit] See also[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_innovation

Related:  Open innovation-mémoireBusiness Model thinking

What is Open Innovation? (formerly Center for Open Innovation) What is Open Innovation? Open Innovation is the use of purposive inflows and outflows of knowledge to accelerate innovation. Persona (user experience) In marketing and user-centered design, personas are fictional characters created to represent the different user types within a targeted demographic, attitude and/or behavior set that might use a site, brand or product in a similar way. Marketers may use personas together with market segmentation, where the qualitative personas are constructed to be representative of specific segments. The term persona is used widely in online and technology applications as well as in advertising, where other terms such as pen portraits may also be used.

The next step in open innovation - McKinsey Quarterly - Operations - Product Development For most companies, innovation is a proprietary activity conducted largely inside the organization in a series of closely managed steps. Over the last decade, however, a few consumer product, fashion, and technology businesses have been opening up the product-development process to new ideas hatched outside their walls—from suppliers, independent inventors, and university labs. Executives in a number of companies are now considering the next step in this trend toward more open innovation. For one thing, they are looking at ways to delegate more of the management of innovation to networks of suppliers and independent specialists that interact with each other to cocreate products and services. They also hope to get their customers into the act. If a company could use technology to link these outsiders into its development projects, could it come up with better ideas for new products and develop those ideas more quickly and cheaply than it can today?

Innovation Consulting Services How can you chart a path that will lead to repeatable growth through innovation? Our work with VF Corporation—maker of Lee Jeans, Wrangler, North Face, and Nautica—shows the way. After a year in which revenue declined five percent, this global leader in branded apparel turned to us to help create a strategy to meet ambitious new growth goals. Citizen science Citizen science (also known as crowd science, crowd-sourced science, civic science, or networked science) is scientific research conducted, in whole or in part, by amateur or nonprofessional scientists, often by crowdsourcing and crowdfunding. Formally, citizen science has been defined as "the systematic collection and analysis of data; development of technology; testing of natural phenomena; and the dissemination of these activities by researchers on a primarily avocational basis".[1] Citizen science is sometimes called "public participation in scientific research.

C. K. Prahalad Coimbatore Krishnarao Prahalad (Kannada:ಕೋಯಮ್ಬತುರೆ ಕೃಷ್ಣರಾವ್ ಪ್ರಹಲಾದ್) (8 August 1941 – 16 April 2010)[1] was the Paul and Ruth McCracken Distinguished University Professor of Corporate Strategy at the Stephen M. Ross School of Business in the University of Michigan. During his life, he was frequently ranked as one of the most prominent business thinkers in the world. He was renowned as the co-author of "Core Competence of the Corporation"[4] (with Gary Hamel) and "The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid"[5] (with Stuart L.

Managing the business risks of open innovation - McKinsey Quarterly - Strategy - Innovation Several years ago, something interesting happened in the infrastructure software sector: IBM and a number of other companies pledged some of their own patents to the public to create IP-free zones in parts of the value chain. They did so when a 2004 report showed that Linux, the open-source operating system that had emerged as a viable, low-cost alternative to established operating systems, such as Microsoft Windows and Unix, was inadvertently infringing on more than 250 patents. By voluntarily pledging not to enforce hundreds of IBM’s own patents so long as users of the IP were pursuing only open-source purposes, the company led the creation of an alliance of patent holders dependent on (and willing to defend) open-source software against lawsuits. One result: IBM substantially increased the share of its new products based on Linux. This example seems specialized and unusual; after all, who would give away patents to make more money from innovation?

Business Model Generation - Canvas Using the Business Model Generation Tools There have been some questions posted lately asking for guidance in using the tools associated with the Business Model Generation approach - the Business Model Canvas and the Value Proposition Canvas. Though the Business Model Canvas was released under Creative Commons and the Value Proposition Canvas under copyright, the requirements for use of the two tools are really quite similar. Anyone may use the Business Model Canvas and the Value Proposition Canvas for their own work or to support others in understanding, analysing or changing their business models. This includes people who use the tools within their own companies or in a consulting capacity.

Strangling Innovation: Tesla versus “Rent Seekers” The greatest number of jobs is created when startups create a new market – one where the product or service never existed before or is radically more convenient. Yet this is where startups will run into anti-innovation opponents they may not expect. These opponents have their own name – “rent seekers” – the landlords of the status-quo. Smart startups prepare to face off against rent seekers and map out creative strategies for doing so…. First, however, they need to understand what a rent seeker is and how they operate… Open innovation and crowdsourcing During decades, innovation has been a locked in process within organizations. In Europe, more and more enterprises are looking for new innovation field to overtake the crisis. If there is a long time that US enterprises like Starbuck or General Electric are crowdsourcing oriented, it’s less common here in Europe (even if examples exist like Daimler or Tchibo)…. Let’s have a look on the basics for external open innovation, to highlight the first steps for these enterprises. In recent years, the company walls fell to accelerate the innovation and creation.

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