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Xentheon - where is my mind

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VirtualBox VirtualBox 5.1.12 for Linux ¶ Note: The package architecture has to match the Linux kernel architecture, that is, if you are running a 64-bit kernel, install the appropriate AMD64 package (it does not matter if you have an Intel or an AMD CPU). Mixed installations (e.g. Debian/Lenny ships an AMD64 kernel with 32-bit packages) are not supported. To install VirtualBox anyway you need to setup a 64-bit chroot environment. The VirtualBox base package binaries are released under the terms of the GPL version 2. Please choose the appropriate package for your Linux distribution: You might want to compare the SHA256 checksum or the MD5 checksum to verify the integrity of downloaded packages. Oracle Linux ¶ Users of Oracle Linux 5, 6 and 7 can use the public yum repository and enable the el5_addons (OEL5), the ol6_addons (OL6) or the ol7_addons (OL7). yum install VirtualBox-5.1 to the latest maintenance release of VirtualBox 5.0.x. Debian-based Linux distributions ¶ You can add these keys with

Linux Toolkit - A Tool 2 Cool 4 U Linux Toolbox Back to Contents Ah, the Linux Toolbox. Remember the Acme Toolkit? Well, this is 10 times better. Guaranteed to catch the RoadRunner! nc (netcat) Yup, the ol' tried and true swiss army knife of networking - netcat. cryptcat Well, improving upon netcat we have cryptcat. stunnel Very similar to netcat and cryptcat, but stunnel uses SSL to encrypt the data. OpenSSH Hopefully no one is using Telnet anymore. nmap Another classic from days past . . . nmap (Network Mapper). Cheops Another very cool tool for mapping networks. dsniff A very sick collection of tools for network auditing and pen-testing (and a favorite among those rogue employees!). Firewalk Firewalk is a useful tool for assisting in the determination of ACLs on network gateways and in mapping networks. hping A very cool TCP/IP packet assembler & analyzer. HUNT HUNT is another questionable tool. nemesis Nemesis is a tool useful for pen-testing as well as a low level learning aid. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Linux tips every geek should know What separates average Linux users from the super-geeks? Simple: years spent learning the kinds of hacks, tricks, tips and techniques that turn long jobs into a moment's work. If you want to get up to speed without having to put in all that leg-work, we've rounded up over 50 easy-to-learn Linux tips to help you work smarter and get the most from your computer. Enjoy! UPDATE: If these tips aren't enough and you want even more, make sure you check out More Linux tips every geek should know! #1: Check processes not run by you Difficulty: Expert Application: bash Imagine the scene - you get yourself ready for a quick round of Crack Attack against a colleague at the office, only to find the game drags to a halt just as you're about to beat your uppity subordinate - what could be happening to make your machine so slow? OK, let's list all the processes on the box not being run by you! ps aux | grep -v `whoami` Or, to be a little more clever, why not just list the top ten time-wasters: find . reset

Graphical Network Simulator - GNS3 Dave McKean / The Particle Tar What Is Btrfs Filesystem (and Why Is It Better Than Ext4)? There is more to a hard drive than its size. While the amount of disk space is all you see marketed about a hard drive on a sales page, there is actually an extensive amount of coding that goes into making a hard drive capable of handling your applications and data in the first place. Most Linux distributions currently default to using the ext4 file system, but the future for many of them lies with the B-tree file system, better known as Btrfs. To put it simply, a file system is how a hard drive is able to store, access, and manage files. While different operating systems can run off of the same hard drive, they tend not to share the same file system. Btrfs is a modern file system that began development back in 2007. Btrfs is not a successor to the default Ext4 file system used in most Linux distributions, but it can be expected to replace Ext4 in the future. Btrfs is expected to offer better scalability and reliability. Stability implies that something is unchanging.

Linux: Install a million games in one click! Linux: Install a million games in one click! Updated: December 16, 2009 Well, not really a million, but how about tens or hundreds? Good enough for you? Do you know what this means? djl homepage djl is an open-source game manager for Linux, written in Python and inspired by Steam Valve for Windows. Get djl The first thing you will have to do is download the installer script from the website. tar zxvf <archive-name> cd <extracted-archive-dir> chmod +x djl.sh . When you run the script the first time, if you do not have the Python framework installed, you'll get an error. Run djl Once you have everything in place, run the application. Using djl Now comes the really cool part. Go to Repository tab and start enjoying this beautiful, powerful game manager. Just click Install to get the game downloaded and setup. What more, you're bound to succeed. We'll talk about Racer and many other games in the eighth mega thread coming soon. Plugins djl is an extensive tool, with plugins available. GameStore

Boot and run Linux from a USB flash memory stick

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