background preloader

Introduction

Introduction
Haskell is a computer programming language. In particular, it is a polymorphically statically typed, lazy, purely functional language, quite different from most other programming languages. The language is named for Haskell Brooks Curry, whose work in mathematical logic serves as a foundation for functional languages. Haskell is based on the lambda calculus, hence the lambda we use as a logo. 1 Why use Haskell? Writing large software systems that work is difficult and expensive. WOW! Even if you are not in a position to use Haskell in your programming projects, learning Haskell can make you a better programmer in any language. I learned Haskell a couple of years ago, having previously programmed in Python and (many) other languages. Haskell offers you: Substantially increased programmer productivity (Ericsson measured an improvement factor of between 9 and 25 using Erlang, a functional programming language similar to Haskell, in one set of experiments on telephony software). 3.4 Brevity

http://www.haskell.org/haskellwiki/Introduction

Related:  Haskell

View topic - Haskell vs Prolog, or "Giving Haskell a choice" I've become more and more familiar with Haskell, and more and more have I begun to realize its true potential. It's truly frightening, really. One of the things I've started to realize is how well it can adapt different programming paradigms without sacrificing its functional purity.Another language I'm quite fond of is Prolog, and I'm actually somewhat sad I haven't spent more time hacking in it.That said, I decided to try a little experiment: writing Prolog in Haskell, staying as true to Prolog as possible, and see if the forced paradigm breaks it. I'll be rather thorough in explaining how things work for the benefit of the Prolog and Haskell illiterates out there, so if you're familiar with both you might want to tl;dr, or just bask in the glory that is Prolog and Haskell combined. At first this might seem somewhat difficult.

Excellent Overview of Functional Programming 14 Feb 2008 I just ran into an article on DZone that totally threw me off my chair in terms of content. It’s titled (ambitiously enough) “Functional Programming For the Rest of Us“. Basically the article attempts to explain many of the common FP techniques in terms that imperative programmers can understand. Introduction - Learn You a Haskell for Great Good! About this tutorial Welcome to Learn You a Haskell for Great Good! If you're reading this, chances are you want to learn Haskell. Well, you've come to the right place, but let's talk about this tutorial a bit first.

Composing Reactive Animations Conal Elliott Microsoft Research Graphics Group Copyright 1998 We have all seen a lot of wonderful looking computer graphics, and many of us have spent time playing video games or watching our kids (or their kids) play them. Functional Programming For The Rest of Us Monday, June 19, 2006 Introduction Programmers are procrastinators. Get in, get some coffee, check the mailbox, read the RSS feeds, read the news, check out latest articles on techie websites, browse through political discussions on the designated sections of the programming forums. Rinse and repeat to make sure nothing is missed. Go to lunch.

Typeclassopedia By Brent Yorgey, byorgey@cis.upenn.edu Originally published 12 March 2009 in issue 13 of the Monad.Reader. Ported to the Haskell wiki in November 2011 by Geheimdienst. This is now the official version of the Typeclassopedia and supersedes the version published in the Monad.Reader. Please help update and extend it by editing it yourself or by leaving comments, suggestions, and questions on the talk page. The standard Haskell libraries feature a number of type classes with algebraic or category-theoretic underpinnings.

Can Your Programming Language Do This? by Joel Spolsky Tuesday, August 01, 2006 One day, you're browsing through your code, and you notice two big blocks that look almost exactly the same. In fact, they're exactly the same, except that one block refers to "Spaghetti" and one block refers to "Chocolate Moose." // A trivial example: alert("I'd like some Spaghetti!"); alert("I'd like some Chocolate Moose!") Haskell Haskell is a functional programming language. If you have some programming experience, see the overview to see a bit of how Haskell works and is different from other languages. Haskell is distinct in a few ways: Haskell is a pure functional programming language. Roundup: Scala for Java Refugees 13 Feb 2008 To be honest, I’m somewhat kicking myself for writing this post. As I’ve said many times: roundup posts are for people who are too lazy to write real content.

Does category theory make you a better programmer ? How much of category theory knowledge should a working programmer have ? I guess this depends on what kind of language the programmer uses in his daily life. Given the proliferation of functional languages today, specifically typed functional languages (Haskell, Scala etc.) that embeds the typed lambda calculus in some form or the other, the question looks relevant to me. And apparently to afewothers as well. In one of his courses on Category Theory, Graham Hutton mentioned the following points when talking about the usefulness of the theory : Building bridges—exploring relationships between various mathematical objects, e.g., Products and FunctionUnifying ideas - abstracting from unnecessary details to give general definitions and results, e.g., FunctorsHigh level language - focusing on how things behave rather than what their implementation details are e.g. specification vs implementationType safety - using types to ensure that things are combined only in sensible ways e.g.

Related: