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8 Steps To Design Problem-Based Learning In Your Classroom

8 Steps To Design Problem-Based Learning In Your Classroom
What Is Problem-Based Learning? by TeachThought Staff What is problem-based learning? One definition, if we want to start simple, is learning that is based around a problem. That is, the development, analysis, and thinking towards a problem drives student learning forward. We’ve been meaning to write a kind of beginner’s guide/primer to problem-based learning for, oh, about 18 months now and haven’t yet, so Mia MacMeekin’ss graphic here is going to have to do. The graphic eschews Mia’s usual squared, grid approach for something a bit more linear and comprehensive–an 8-step sequence to designing problem-based learning in your classroom. 8 Steps To Design Problem-Based Learning In Your Classroom 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. You can read more about learning models and theories in our 21st Century Dictionary for Teachers. 8 Steps To Design Problem-Based Learning In Your Classroom

http://www.teachthought.com/learning/8-steps-to-design-problem-based-learning-in-your-classroom/

Related:  Te@chThought.com PBL ResourcesProject Based LearningProject & Problem based Learning

Why Learning Innovation Can't Come From Teachers Alone Why Learning Innovation Can’t Come From Teachers Alone by Terry Heick Grant Wiggins, a learning expert who has inspired me since my first year in the classroom, recently wrote about the intersection of academic standards and creativity. “Why do people insist on viewing the Standards as inconsistent with teacher creativity and choice? I am baffled by such uncreative thinking. That’s like saying the architect cannot be creative because every house has to meet building code. 12 Timeless Project-Based Learning Resources 12 Timeless Project-Based Learning Resources by Shannon Dauphin Project-based learning is becoming increasingly popular as teachers look for a way to make lessons stick in the minds of their students. According to Edutopia, studies have shown that students who use project-based learning remember the material much longer and have healthier attitudes toward education. Project-based learning is based on the idea that students learn best by tackling and solving real world problems. Students are much more engaged with the subject matter and look to the teacher as more of a coach who guides them through their own reflections and ideas.

42 Fill-in-the-Blank Prompts For Students To Design Their Own Projects 42 Fill-in-the-Blank Prompts For Students To Design Their Own Projects by Terry Heick So often, we make learning more complicated than it has to be. Local planning requirements are usually at fault here–plan this way and prove that you’ve done so here and here, fill out this and this, etc. Those legitimate concerns aside, the following series of fill-in-the-blank prompts can be used by teachers to create lessons, students to create projects–or teachers to collaborate with students to create lessons–or projects. Or, well, you get the idea.

Using Technology To Redefine The Way Schools & Communities Connect How To Connect Schools And Communities Using Technology: A New Approach by Terry Heick Fixing Detached Schools Via Tech It’s possible that there is no time in the history of education that our systems of educating have been so out of touch with the communities. Growing populations, shifting communities, and increasingly inwardly-focused schools all play a role. Problem-Based Learning or Just Another Project? Use This Checklist to Find Out A few days ago I posted Amy Mayer’s comparison between assigning projects and developing project-based learning in the classroom. Due to its immense popularity, I decided to do some more research on helpful charts for teachers trying to implement PBL in their classrooms, and was thrilled to come across this checklist from the good folks at BIE: This checklist is a fantastic way to ensure that you are on the right track with shifting away from “doing a project” and moving towards project-based learning. Even if you are still at the planning phase, this is a great graphic to get you thinking about the essential elements you should include in your next project-based learning unit! Happy checking, y’all!

PBL Gallery Home | Getting Started | Modules | Resources | About Us View the work of teachers who developed and implemented PBL units/mini-units. Feel free to download and use the PBL as a template for your work with students. The Life Of A Project: Emotions And Project-Based Learning Project-Based Learning: Inside The Life Of A Project by Terry Heick At some point, I saw “the life of a project” diagram on pinterest, and thought it did a brilliant job of capturing the emotion of teaching and learning through projects. A Project-Based Learning Cheat Sheet For Authentic Learning A Project-Based Learning Cheat Sheet by TeachThought Staff Like most buzzwords in education, “authenticity” isn’t a new idea. High school stops fighting, learns to love students and tech At the public New Tech High School in California, students bring their own laptops and are encouraged to use Twitter in class. The New Tech High School in Napa allows students to bring in their own computersInstead of limiting access to social media, school teaches about digital responsibility Custom program using Google Apps puts assignments, grades in the cloud Napa, California (CNN) -- Many high-school-age students are hooked on their phones and computers.

10 Team-Building Games That Promote Collaborative Critical Thinking One of education’s primary goals is to groom the next generation of little humans to succeed in the “real world.” Yes, there are mounds of curricula they must master in a wide breadth of subjects, but education does not begin and end with a textbook or test. Other skills must be honed, too, not the least of which is how to get along with their peers and work well with others. This is not something that can be cultivated through rote memorization or with strategically placed posters. Students must be engaged and cooperation must be practiced, and often. The following team-building games can promote cooperation and communication, help establish a positive classroom environment and — most importantly — provide a fun, much-needed reprieve from routine.

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