background preloader

Kids Share Book Recommendations. Use Online Reading Logs, Find Books At Their Reading Level

Kids Share Book Recommendations. Use Online Reading Logs, Find Books At Their Reading Level

https://www.biblionasium.com/#tab/content-new-releases

Related:  Reading

We Give Books Read Rivers and Lakes For Ages: 8-10 JOIN or LOGIN to read this book. More info Navigating Text Complexity Understanding text complexity is essential to implementing the Common Core State Standards in ELA & Literacy. But what makes a text complex and how will it help prepare my students for college and career? What tools can I use to select rich, worthy texts for instruction in my classroom? How can analyzing the qualitative characteristics of a text inform my instruction of a text?

Connected - Teachers' Notes You are here:Introduction Connected is a series designed to show mathematics, science, and technology in the context of students’ everyday lives. The articles are intended to stimulate discussion and to provide starting points for further investigations by individuals, groups, or a whole class. A shared or guided reading approach to using these texts will support students in understanding the concepts and technical vocabulary. (See the introduction to the School Journal Teachers’ Notes for suggestions on approaches to reading.)

Instructional Practice Guide: Academic Word Finder What is academic vocabulary? Academic vocabulary (also known as Tier 2 vocabulary) words appear in many different contexts and are subtle or precise ways to say relatively simple things, for example “relative” or “accumulate”. The Common Core emphasizes regular practice with complex text and its academic vocabulary because academic vocabulary helps students access and understand increasing levels of complex texts across all content areas. Why is academic vocabulary so important?

Brain Movies: When Readers Can Picture It, They Understand It Editor's note: This post is co-authored by Marcus Conyers who, with Donna Wilson, is co-developer of the M.S. and Ed.S. Brain-Based Teaching degree programs at Nova Southeastern University. They have written several books, including Five Big Ideas for Effective Teaching: Connecting Mind, Brain, and Education Research to Classroom Practice. The images that form in your mind as you read -- we call them "brain movies" -- can be more exciting and memorable than a Hollywood film. More to the point for teachers, guiding your students to visualize as they read is an engaging and enjoyable way to boost comprehension and retention. Learning to create brain movies can help students make sense of complex nonfiction subject matter and "see" the characters, setting, and action in stories.

5 Key Strategies For ELL Instruction English Language Learners (ELLs) face the double challenge of learning academic content as well as the language in which it is presented. Teachers have traditionally treated language learning as a process of imparting words and structures or rules to students, separate from the process of teaching content knowledge. This approach has left ELLs especially unprepared to work with the complex texts and the academic types of language that are required to engage in content area practices, such as solving word problems in Mathematics, or deconstructing an author’s reasoning and evidence in English Language Arts. ELLs need to be given frequent, extended opportunities to speak about content material and work through complex texts in English with small groups of classmates.

Melulater: Modelling Books - how I use these to plan, teach and assess in my class Modelling Books were not around when I began my training to become a teacher. I didn't know anything about them really until 2005 when my school began their journey with the Numeracy Project. We had two facilitators come into our school to guide and support us in taking on the Numeracy Project, and part of that was demonstrating how to set up our modelling books and use them to aid us to teach a group of students. I credit Reshma (currently at Hautapu School) as being the Numeracy Project advisor who really started my journey with modelling books and my love affair with them.

Strategies for Teaching English Language Learners If you're like most teachers, your classes have increasingly become more linguistically diverse. If you're looking for ways to meet the needs of students who struggle with or are just learning English, I am here to help! For the last eight years, I have had the fortunate opportunity to work with many students who are English language learners. It's been an exceptionally challenging and rewarding experience and I am thrilled to be able to share with you some of the best practices that I've used in my classroom. My background includes three years solely focused on English Language Development (ELD). The Best Children’s Books of 2014 by Maria Popova Intelligent and imaginative tales of love, loneliness, loyalty, loss, friendship, and everything in between. “I don’t write for children,” Maurice Sendak scoffed in his final interview.

What Is Comprehensible Input? A critical concept for second-language development for students with and without learning difficulties is comprehensible input. Comprehensible input means that students should be able to understand the essence of what is being said or presented to them. This does not mean, however, that teachers must use only words students understand. In fact, instruction can be incomprehensible even when students know all of the words. Students learn a new language best when they receive input that is just a bit more difficult than they can easily understand. In other words, students may understand most, but not all, words the teacher is using. Reciprocal Teaching Before Reciprocal Teaching can be used successfully by your students, they need to have been taught and had time to practice the four strategies that are used in reciprocal teaching (summarizing, questioning, predicting, clarifying). One way to get students prepared to use reciprocal teaching: (from Donna Dyer of the North West Regional Education Service Agency in North Carolina) Put students in groups of four. Distribute one note card to each member of the group identifying each person's unique role: Summarizer Questioner Clarifier Predictor Have students read a few paragraphs of the assigned text selection. Encourage them to use note-taking strategies such as selective underlining or sticky-notes to help them better prepare for their role in the discussion.

Related: