background preloader

Stumbleupon

Stumbleupon
by Libby Nelson on March 3, 2015 English is the language of Shakespeare and the language of Chaucer. It's spoken in dozens of countries around the world, from the United States to a tiny island named Tristan da Cunha. It reflects the influences of centuries of international exchange, including conquest and colonization, from the Vikings through the 21st century. The origins of English Where English comes fromEnglish, like more than 400 other languages, is part of the Indo-European language family, sharing common roots not just with German and French but with Russian, Hindi, Punjabi, and Persian. The spread of English The colonization of AmericaThe British settlers coming to different parts of America in the 17th and 18th centuries were from different regional, class, and religious backgrounds, and brought with them distinctive ways of speaking. English around the world Countries with English as the official languageFifty-eight countries have English as an official language. Related:  Language history and linguisticsannieliz

History of the English Language by Nikki Morrell on Prezi Cooperation vs. Collaboration | SLWorkshop School librarians are quite specific about the difference between cooperation and collaboration. In the first case, the librarian and the teacher work independently from each other but share a common direction with each contributing content or process based on what there are of expertise is. The second involves a much closer connection. While the teacher is likely to be the architect of the unit in question in a cooperative arrangement with librarian adding pieces unique to the library program, in a collaborative relationship both discuss the unit together, determine the Essential Questions and the desired Learning Outcomes. Obviously, the second model is the better one for transforming student learning, but for most elementary school librarians and many middle school ones, the constraints of a fixed schedule make collaboration challenging. collaboration can be achieved within a fixed schedule day. Many years ago, I worked in an elementary school modeled on the British infant school.

A History of the World - List of Objects Foreign language influences in English - Wikipedia According to one study, the percentage of modern English words derived from each language group are as follows: Latin (including words used only in scientific / medical / legal contexts): ~29% French: ~29% Germanic: ~26% Others: ~16% The core of English descends from Old English, the language brought with the Angles, Saxon and Jutish settlers to what was to be called England in and after the 500s. The bulk of the language in spoken and written texts is from this source. As a statistical rule, around 70% of words in any text are Anglo-Saxon. Moreover, the grammar is largely Anglo-Saxon. While some new words enter English as slang, most don't. Counting[edit] Cardinal numbering in English follows two models, Germanic and Italic. Standard English, especially in very conservative formal contexts, continued to use native Germanic style as late as World War I for intermediate numbers greater than 20, viz. See also[edit] Linguistic purism in English Further reading[edit] Pyles, T. & J.

slmimpact - home Origins of English PieChart - Foreign language influences in English - Wikipedia According to one study, the percentage of modern English words derived from each language group are as follows: Latin (including words used only in scientific / medical / legal contexts): ~29% French: ~29% Germanic: ~26% Others: ~16% The core of English descends from Old English, the language brought with the Angles, Saxon and Jutish settlers to what was to be called England in and after the 500s. The bulk of the language in spoken and written texts is from this source. As a statistical rule, around 70% of words in any text are Anglo-Saxon. Moreover, the grammar is largely Anglo-Saxon. While some new words enter English as slang, most don't. Counting[edit] Cardinal numbering in English follows two models, Germanic and Italic. Standard English, especially in very conservative formal contexts, continued to use native Germanic style as late as World War I for intermediate numbers greater than 20, viz. See also[edit] Linguistic purism in English Further reading[edit] Pyles, T. & J.

6 Secrets to Successful Research with Kids Research, the very word, can draw shudders from teachers and audible sighs from students. If you are one of those shuddering educators dreading that next research project, then you are truly going about research all wrong. Take it from this elementary school librarian!! I have been an elementary educator for twenty years, and a certified library media specialist for the last seven years. I am so pleased that Rachel has let me be your virtual librarian today on Minds in Bloom. How about a few insider secrets to turns those sighs into high fives?? 1) Your librarian should be your best resource. 2) You can easily teach inquiry-based research skills in short bursts of time. 3) I believe that it is our job to set our students up for success. Scaffold the project. Provide strong resources. Simplify the citation process. 4) Successful research inquiries begin with strong keywords! Some people, even a few librarians, think that simple fact-finding questions lack depth and complexity.

High Tech in High Heels: QR Code Listening to Reading Library QR Codes have completely changed my classroom in ways I never saw coming. Once I started using them I couldn't stop. Being in a combination classroom, differentiation is essential and QR codes leveled the playing field. More on that some other time. (Gotta keep you coming back, right?) Last year we came across this brilliant idea to use QR Codes for a Listening Library for Listening to Reading for D5. Here's what we did: 1.) 2.) 3.) 4.) 5.) 6.) 7.) I know there are new options to record voice out there. Some great ideas to use for your Listening Library: *Ask parents to record their voice while reading a book. *Have advanced students record their voice, practicing fluency (rate AND expression). *Ask older students to record their voices. *Ask specials teachers or the principal to read. *Share with your team. *If your school does Accelerated Reader testing, record LOTS of those books for your younger readers. I have attached some QR codes that I have already created. March on,

Related: