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Edutopia

Edutopia
I remember how, as a new teacher, I would attend a professional development and feel inundated with new strategies. (I wanted to get back to the classroom and try them all!) After the magic of that day wore off, I reflected on the many strategies and would often think, "Lots of great stuff, but I'm not sure it's worth the time it would take to implement it all." We teachers are always looking to innovate, so, yes, it's essential that we try new things to add to our pedagogical bag of tricks. But it's important to focus on purpose and intentionality -- and not on quantity. So what really matters more than "always trying something new" is the reason behind why we do what we do. What Research Says This leads me to educational researcher John Hattie, who wrote Visible Learning for Teachers: Maximizing Impact on Learning. Hattie has spent more than 15 years researching the influences on achievement of K-12 children. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Collaborating with Colleagues

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/5-highly-effective-teaching-practices-rebecca-alber

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Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: Here Is An Awesome Tool for Creat... January 9, 2015 Postcard Creator is an excellent interactive tool from ReadWriteThink students can use to create awesome postcards to share with others. You can use it in writing activities with your students to engage them in literacy learning. Besides learning about the different parts making a postcard, Postcard Creator provides students with a ready made template where they can fill in their information and generate beautiful postcards. The finished postcard can be printed and shared with others. To start using Postcard Creator, head over to this page and click on ‘Get Started’ and read through the tips provided there then click on ‘next’.Type in an example address, write the description of the scene or images that you will create for the front of the postcard.

Confessions of a Teacher Who Doesn't Believe In Education  I was one of those people that always knew what I wanted to be when I "grew up". I wanted to teach. Asking children, and teenagers what they want to be when they grow up , or what they want to major in when they graduate high school, is a pretty common question. Many people never know the answer, those of us that do, and are luckily enough to have a response that falls onto the list of " acceptable, and safe jobs," seem to have it lucky. As a child I played school with my neighbors, I was always the teacher, and if they weren't around, I taught pretend students, and helped my mom, an elementary teacher, grade papers.

Advice for a Kindergarten Teacher ~ Linky Party I'm coming to you today with a linky party hosted by Sharing Kindergarten! Here are my top 4 tips: I know there are probably things that you HAVE to have at a certain time - lunch, PE, Music, a reading block or math block. Empowering Student Relationships With Media Debates over children and media use are nothing new, but the technologies by which children primarily interact with media have changed significantly. Most guidelines related to "screen time" were developed when television was the dominant media, but new technologies are making us question the value of older research. In its most recent report on the subject, the American Academy of Pediatrics makes reference to "important positive and prosocial effects of media use," and a call for expanding media education programs in schools. While more dedicated media education in schools would be great, it is little more than a pipe dream in the current climate of low budgets and high-stake tests. It is therefore incumbent on individual educators to help students interact with media in ways that are critical and empowering.

Ten Takeaway Tips for Teaching Critical Thinking Suggestions from educators at KIPP King Collegiate High School on how to help develop and assess critical-thinking skills in your students. Ideally, teaching kids how to think critically becomes an integral part of your approach, no matter what subject you teach. But if you're just getting started, here are some concrete ways you can begin leveraging your students' critical-thinking skills in the classroom and beyond. 1.

Library The library is the central hub of learning in the school. It is an inclusive, dynamic, information rich learning environment that supports the learning needs of students. The library is a welcoming place where students are engaged in learning from research to study to quiet reading to playing educational games to planning social justice activities to small group discussions and the list continues. Hundreds of students pass through the library on any given day where they are expected to think, ask and create! Defining "Best Practice" in Teaching It's often said in the teaching world (as in many professions and trades, I imagine), "Why reinvent the wheel when there are plenty of practices that already work?" In their book, Professional Capital: Transforming Teaching in Every School, Andy Hargreaves and Michael Fullan share their definition for "best practices," which they define as existing practices that already possess a high level of widely-agreed effectiveness. We teachers are standing on the shoulders of giants before us who have developed tried-and-true strategies by testing them out, reflecting on the outcomes, and honing those strategies over decades or longer.

Child development: 5-6 years child; development; five; 5; six; 6; social; emotional; understanding; physical; speech; language; relationships; independence; social; skills; play; reading; lefthanded ; Many children begin school at five. This is because by five most children have developed enough independence and understanding to enable them to cope away from home for such a length of time. As always, this varies with each child and some will be more ready than others to be away from their parents and to make relationships with people outside the family. The Raising Children Network website has a lot of information about school aged children, including information about development, behaviour, fitness, health and daily care.

25 Ways to Develop 21st Century Thinkers The need to develop critical thinkers has never been as urgent as it is now. In a world that is digitally focused and where there is an outpouring of information surfeit, students need to be equipped with the right tools to live up to the new learning exigencies. Critical thinking as a skill is the mother of all other skills and one that underpins and solidify students overall learning. Given the importance of cultivating a culture of critical thinking inside our classrooms and to help teachers have access to a wide range of resources on how to teach and enhance students critical thinking skills, Educational Technology and mobile Learning has devoted an entire section to everything teachers need in order to teach and integrate this skills in their teaching. You can access it HERE. Today, we are adding another great resource.

11 Multimedia Lessons to Inspire Change - Official Teach Blog This is the first in a series of articles to take you through some multi-media tools and ideas that can help your students to become confident learners by becoming confident thinkers. So many things can happen in a classroom in any one minute – have you ever thought of freeze-framing one instant in a classroom and going back to reflect upon how many teachable moments are present within this moment? How can we allow students to create their own moments in the classroom? Perhaps by encouraging our students to be responsible for their own choices, and by believing in them, we can create the impetus for growth, challenge and change. We can encourage students to take the initiative by ”allowing” them to be themselves. To quote Jeffrey Doonan from my teacher-sourced inquiries on facebook:

Bringing teachers to the library How do you bring teachers into the library? Isobel Williams describes two library activities that provided a springboard for talking about research and information literacy with teachers in her school. In late 2005, I was appointed to Tasmania’s largest school, an all-girls state school for Years 7 to 10. The role was designed specifically to introduce the new curriculum area Being information literate across the school. For various reasons, mainly political, the new curriculum has shifted in emphasis.

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