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The girl who gets gifts from birds

The girl who gets gifts from birds
Image copyright Lisa Mann Lots of people love the birds in their garden, but it's rare for that affection to be reciprocated. One young girl in Seattle is luckier than most. She feeds the crows in her garden - and they bring her gifts in return. Eight-year-old Gabi Mann sets a bead storage container on the dining room table, and clicks the lid open. This is her most precious collection. "You may take a few close looks," she says, "but don't touch." Inside the box are rows of small objects in clear plastic bags. Each item is individually wrapped and categorised. There's a miniature silver ball, a black button, a blue paper clip, a yellow bead, a faded black piece of foam, a blue Lego piece, and the list goes on. Image copyright Katy Sewall She didn't gather this collection. She holds up a pearl coloured heart. Gabi's relationship with the neighbourhood crows began accidentally in 2011. As she got older, she rewarded their attention, by sharing her packed lunch on the way to the bus stop.

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-31604026

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