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A Note to Our Readers About Comments The first thing you’ll probably notice is an entirely new design, which for the first time brings our readers’ comments onto the same page as the article or blog post. This improves the old system, which relegated them to a separate page. We are also adding new functions. Comments are now threaded, giving readers the ability to respond to one another. In addition, we’ve added tie-ins to social media: comments, both yours and others', can now be shared to Twitter and Facebook. And finally, we are introducing a program for “trusted” commenters -- those who have maintained a history of posting outstanding comments on the site. We look forward to hearing from you. Jill Abramson, Executive Editor

The Data-Pixel Approach To Improving User Experience - Smashing UX Design Advertisement There are many ways to skin a redesign (I think that’s how the saying goes). On a philosophical level, I agree with those who advocate for realigning, not redesigning, but these are mere words when you’re staring a design problem in the face with no idea where to start. This article came out of my own questions about how to make the realignment philosophy practical and apply it to my day-to-day work — especially when what’s needed is more than a few tweaks to the website here and there. I propose an approach to redesign through realignment, by using a framework adapted from Edward Tufte’s principles on the visual display of quantitative information. But first, a little context. Redesign Through Realignment Let’s recap the redesign versus realign argument. The desire to redesign is aesthetic-driven, while the desire to realign is purpose-driven. A realignment can include a full refresh, but the starting point is not the visual layer. Edward Tufte And The Data-Ink Ratio Summary

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