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Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff

Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff
An idea that is beginning to gain a lot of favour in educational circles at the moment is the notion of fixed versus growth mindsets, and how they might relate to students and learning. Based on the work of Stanford University psychologist, Carol Dweck, the idea of mindset is related to our understanding of where ability comes from. It has recently been seized upon by educators as a tool to explore our knowledge of student achievement, and ways that such achievement might be improved. However, in my work, I have found that the notion of developing a growth mindset is as equally applicable to staff and teacher performance as it is to students. This article begins with a brief discussion about the difference between the two mindsets, what that means for education, and concludes with some ideas for how school leaders might seek to develop a growth mindset amongst their staff. According to Dweck: Needless to say, this idea of mindsets has significant implications for education. Modelling

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Picture Books that model perseverance It’s Picture Book Month and I have picture books on my mind. I am beginning to think in lists. Often. It may be a syndrome. The Science: The Growth Mindset - Mindset Works®: Student Motivation through a Growth Mindset, by Carol Dweck, Ph.D. Why the Growth Mindset? When students and educators have a growth mindset, they understand that intelligence can be developed. Students focus on improvement instead of worrying about how smart they are.

8 Types Of Infographics & Which One To Use When Whether you love them or hate them, infographics are still one of the most effective ways to present a lot of information in an interesting, concise and easily digestible way. It’s much faster to get the gist of something by scanning an infographic than reading several paragraphs of text. There have been a lot of bad infographics presented over the past few years, but overall, I’m noticing that the quality is going up. What Believing in the Possibilities Can Do For Learning and Teaching By Thom Markham In medicine, the placebo effect is well known, but still mysterious. Through some unknown connection between mind and body, placebos produce changes in brain states, immune systems, blood pressure and hormone levels. Creating a Growth Mindset in Your Students Belief that you can become smarter and more talented opens the doorways to success. That’s what twenty years of research has shown Carol Dweck of Stanford University. She has identified two opposing beliefs about intelligence and talent, beliefs that strongly impact our ability to learn. Though the fixed mindset has traditionally held sway, many recent studies show that the growth mindset better represents our abilities. Our brains are much more elastic than previously thought, constantly growing new connections. IQ and talent are not fixed, but are mutable based on experience and attitude.

EDUC 512 Week 5 ← APU EdTech The Machine is Us/ing Us Depth of Knowledge Check out Hess’ Cognitive Rigor Matrix, which correlates Depth of Knowledge with Bloom’s Taxonomy. Bloom’s Revised and Depth of Knowledge working together… How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies In his new book, “How We Learn: The Surprising Truth about When, Where, and Why It Happens,” author Benedict Carey informs us that “most of our instincts about learning are misplaced, incomplete, or flat wrong” and “rooted more in superstition than in science.” That’s a disconcerting message, and hard to believe at first. But it’s also unexpectedly liberating, because Carey further explains that many things we think of as detractors from learning — like forgetting, distractions, interruptions or sleeping rather than hitting the books — aren’t necessarily bad after all. They can actually work in your favor, according to a body of research that offers surprising insights and simple, doable strategies for learning more effectively.

Rethinking the Role of Educator as Facilitator Amidst Tech Transformation Thanks to the rapid developments in education technology, there is an abundance of teaching tools available to educators: videos students can watch at home, lesson plans that can be easily downloaded (and for free), courses that can be completed at one’s own pace. With so much information available, much of it on platforms developed by private companies, high school English teacher Michael Godsey asks what this all means for the future of the teaching profession in this post in The Atlantic, and what the role of “facilitator” could mean in the future classroom that’s closer to five years away instead of 20. In the Atlantic: “I don’t have many answers in this brave new world, but I feel like I can draw one firm line.

5 Tips for a Happy Life from Winnie the Pooh “Did you ever stop to think, and forget to start again?” “Well,” said Pooh, “what I like best — ” and then he had to stop and think. Because although eating honey was a very good thing to do, there was a moment just before you began to eat it which was better than when you were, but he didn’t know what it was called.” Teaching strategies to create 'growth' mindsets As a kid I wanted to become a cliché when I grew up so I bought a guitar and grew my hair. I successfully learnt all the chords but struggled to combine them in a meaningful way (perhaps I should’ve joined an experimental jazz band instead of churning out 1980s power ballads). When my dreams of rock stardom eventually withered on the vine, I turned my attention to mastering magic, then to conquering chess, and to all manner of other hobbies. What all these childhood endeavours had in common – apart from their mutual failure – was that I took it for granted that I’d have to work hard at them, I knew I’d have to practise endlessly and that I wouldn’t become expert overnight.

Reflections from an Elementary School Principal: Encouraging a growth mindset Here's a cross-post from my staff memo blog... Last school year I learned a great deal from the book Mindset, by Carol Dweck and shared my learning with you in this post. I don't know if anyone else also read this book, but I am starting to notice a lot of classroom practices and teachers talking in ways to encourage students to have a growth mindset versus a fixed mindset. In one classroom, students were discussing the following quote: "We all make mistakes. That's why a pencil has an eraser." I've been lucky enough to get into several classrooms during the math talk time to hear students explain their thinking or to see students writing to "Puzzled Penguin" to tell him what math mistake he made.

Growth Mindset: Clearing up Some Common Confusions By Eduardo Briceño A growth mindset is the understanding that personal qualities and abilities can change. It leads people to take on challenges, persevere in the face of setbacks, and become more effective learners. As more and more people learn about the growth mindset, which was first discovered by Stanford Professor Carol Dweck, we sometimes observe some confusions about it. Recently some critiques have emerged. Digital Citizenship Lessons / Grade 6 Digital Citizenship Lessons The following website is the embedded link found at the end of the Copyright PowerPoint presentation for Cyberbee Questions: Supplemental Resources BrainPOP - a website link for copyright with activities and a quiz (Must have a subscription) Copyright Resources - Links for defining and understanding copyright, lessons, definitions, and The Copyright Challenge: an interactive quiz. ReadWrite Think-Copyright - Lesson plans and links on copyright: Note that "How to Cite Sources" is not covered, only the concept of plagiarism.

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