background preloader

The Three Best Free Coding Websites for Kids

The Three Best Free Coding Websites for Kids
The Three Best Free Coding Websites for Kids. From 2012 to 2022, the field of computer science is projected to grow 22%, which is much faster than average, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Computer software is a growing field and allows for a great job outlook as well as entrepreneurial potential. As such, coding skills are incredibly useful for today’s students to learn — but it’s not just due to job prospects. Since today’s most interesting tools and platforms can all be manipulated by coding, having coding skills is also a great jumping off point for greater independence creativity. Today there are many resources for people to learn code. ● Ease of use ● Aesthetics ● Fun ● Effectiveness ● Free Without further ado, the following are the best coding websites we found that was designed especially with kids in mind. Code Avengers Code Avengers is another great educational web platform that introduces users to HTML, Javascript, and CSS. Strengths: Weaknesses: Lightbot Basics Loops

http://www.edudemic.com/the-three-best-free-coding-websites-for-kids/

Related:  ProgramaciónCoding04 Games and Tutorials

15+ Ways of Teaching Every Student to Code (Even Without a Computer) According to Code.org, 90 percent of parents in the U.S. want their children to learn computer science—it will be crucial for many jobs in the near future—but only 40 percent of schools teach it. Critics claim that it is mainly the more affluent schools that offer computer science courses, thus denying those who attend poorer schools the chance to learn necessary skills. A focus on STEM is not enough: Code.org also reports that while 70 percent of new STEM jobs are in computing, only 7 percent of STEM graduates are in computer science.

scratch-unplugged - Scratch Programs for Computer Science Unplugged Computer Science Unplugged Computer Science Unplugged ( is a set of activities designed to introduce young people to computer science using entertaining dramatizations instead of a computer. Scratch Life After the Hour of Code Now that the excitement of the Hour of Code has passed, and you still vividly remember your students' eyes light up while completing their coding challenges, you may be wondering how to keep that excitement going in your classroom. The only thing is, you don't teach computer science -- and you have no idea how to teach coding. The great news is, that's fine! Whether you are an English teacher, a history teacher, a math teacher, an art teacher, or any other subject area specialist, your students can still incorporate coding into what they are learning. If you're a math teacher, coding is a natural fit -- math skills are essential to programming. You can check out the lessons at Code by Math to see how your students can apply what they are learning in class to a coding challenge.

Teaching Kids to Code Every era demands--and rewards--different skills. In different times and different places, we have taught our children to grow vegetables, build a house, forge a sword or blow a delicate glass, bake bread, create a soufflé, write a story or shoot hoops. Now we are teaching them to code. We are teaching them to code, however, not so much as an end in itself but because our world has morphed: so many of the things we once did with elements such as fire and iron, or tools such as pencil and paper, are now wrought in code.

It's a Geeky Winter Wonderland! - GeekMomGeekMom Lisa Tate Lisa Kay Tate is a veteran feature writer with 20 years experience in newspaper, magazine and freelance writing. In addition to serving as Associate Editor for her local arts and entertainment guide, El Paso Scene, she has been a regular contributor to the site ihogeek.com and maintains her own blogsite at lisathegeekmom.wordpress.com. She, along with her husband, writer/photographer Rick, run the new family-based site, Minion Feeding 101.She and Rick live on the edge of "New Texico" where they keep busy raising their two geeklings and sharing space with their dog, Sirius Black, and cat, Loki. Latest posts by Lisa Tate (see all) I’ve been making snowflakes since I was a little gremlin stealing my mom’s “good scissors” to cut up leftover squares of tissue and gift wrap into little paper blizzards.

15 Free Games to Level Up Your Coding Skills When I started learning to code, the options were limited—lots of books (not even e-books), some very basic online tutorials, and a whole lot of experimentation. Online learning has come a long way in the last few years. There are interactive courses, tons of online tutorials, and one of my personal favorite ways to practice coding: games. 3. Programming unplugged: learning programming without computers An inspiring unplugged session on teaching computing for teachers. Overview It’s easy to assume that programming is something you have to learn at a computer but if you want your students to deeply understand programming concepts, rather than blindly getting programs to work then unplugged techniques can work really well to get students started. We will see how to program a robot face that is made of students, look at a simple way to give a deep understanding of how variables work by making them physical, and see how to compile programs onto your class instead of onto a computer. Session material This session will cover: Inspiring ways to introduce programming away from computers.What is a variable?How does assignment work?

Stencyl Build Worlds If you're used to graphics editors like Photoshop, you'll feel right at home in the Scene Designer. Familiar features, such as a selection tool, zooming, grid-snapping and flood fill, will help you quickly craft complex worlds out of Actors, Tiles and Terrain. Create Actors Drop in graphics from your computer to create Actors on the fly. Then use Stencyl's Actor Editor to tweak your Actors' appearances, behaviors and physical properties, and to get them ready for showtime. Browse Game Assets When it comes to game development, most of us aren't Jacks of all trades. But thanks to StencylForge, our integrated marketplace, we don't have to be.

From Unplugged to Well-Connected Thinkersmith makes CS accessible: From unplugged exercises to computer labs, with Code.org & others. A sample of videos that showcase our work: See what we're up to: www.thinkersmith.org/facility Short and Sweet Thinkersmith believes that computer science should be taught early and with responsibility! CALLING ALL CODERS By 2018, there will be more than two million open jobs in STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) professions, but only 19 percent of current college degrees are in STEM fields. Even worse, 75 percent of students that do well in science and math decide to not pursue STEM in college. If we want to remain a global leader, we have to develop more interest in these topics. One way to do that is by to show students that coding ties into nearly everything we do. And to do that, we need to incorporate programming into the curriculum, just as they’ve done in the following examples.

Related: