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V for Vendetta

V for Vendetta
Publication history[edit] When the publishers cancelled Warrior in 1985 (with two completed issues unpublished due to the cancellation), several companies attempted to convince Moore and Lloyd to let them publish and complete the story. In 1988, DC Comics published a ten-issue series that reprinted the Warrior stories in colour, then continued the series to completion. The first new material appeared in issue No. 7, which included the unpublished episodes that would have appeared in Warrior No. 27 and No. 28. Tony Weare drew one chapter ("Vincent") and contributed additional art to two others ("Valerie" and "The Vacation"); Steve Whitaker and Siobhan Dodds worked as colourists on the entire series. Background[edit] David Lloyd's paintings for V for Vendetta in Warrior originally appeared in black-and-white. Cover of Warrior#19, highlighting the comic's conflict between anarchist and fascist philosophies. Plot[edit] Book 1: Europe After the Reign[edit] Book 2: This Vicious Cabaret[edit] Related:  THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY & THE OCCULT

Rhizome (philosophy) "As a model for culture, the rhizome resists the organizational structure of the root-tree system which charts causality along chronological lines and looks for the original source of 'things' and looks towards the pinnacle or conclusion of those 'things.' A rhizome, on the other hand, is characterized by 'ceaselessly established connections between semiotic chains, organizations of power, and circumstances relative to the arts, sciences, and social struggles.' Rather than narrativize history and culture, the rhizome presents history and culture as a map or wide array of attractions and influences with no specific origin or genesis, for a 'rhizome has no beginning or end; it is always in the middle, between things, interbeing, intermezzo.' "In this model, culture spreads like the surface of a body of water, spreading towards available spaces or trickling downwards towards new spaces through fissures and gaps, eroding what is in its way. Deleuze, Gilles and Félix Guattari. 1980.

Alan Moore Alan Moore (born 18 November 1953) is an English writer primarily known for his work in comic books including Watchmen, V for Vendetta, and From Hell.[1] Frequently described as the best graphic novel writer in history,[2][3] he has been called "one of the most important British writers of the last fifty years".[4] He has occasionally used such pseudonyms as Curt Vile, Jill de Ray, Translucia Baboon and The Original Writer. Moore is an occultist, ceremonial magician,[6] and anarchist,[7] and has featured such themes in works including Promethea, From Hell, and V for Vendetta, as well as performing avant-garde spoken word occult "workings" with The Moon and Serpent Grand Egyptian Theatre of Marvels, some of which have been released on CD. Early life[edit] "LSD was an incredible experience. Not that I'm recommending it for anybody else; but for me it kind of – it hammered home to me that reality was not a fixed thing. Alan Moore (2003)[2](pp19–20) Career[edit] Early career: 1978–1980[edit]

Watchmen Moore used the story as a means to reflect contemporary anxieties and to critique the superhero concept. Watchmen depicts an alternate history where superheroes emerged in the 1940s and 1960s, helping the United States to win the Vietnam War. The country is edging towards a nuclear war with the Soviet Union, freelance costumed vigilantes have been outlawed and most former superheroes are in retirement or working for the government. Creatively, the focus of Watchmen is on its structure. Publication history[edit] Watchmen, created by writer Alan Moore and artist Dave Gibbons, was first published as a 12-issue miniseries from DC Comics, cover-dated September 1986 to October 1987.[1] It was subsequently collected in 1987 as a DC Comics trade paperback graphic novel that has had at least 22 printings as of September 2008;[2] as well, a trade paperback was published by Warner Books, a DC sister company, in 1987.[3] Background and creation[edit] Alan Moore on the basis for Watchmen[9] Story[edit]

Brave New World Classic 1932 science fiction novel by Aldous Huxley In 1999, the Modern Library ranked Brave New World as #5 on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century.[2] In 2003, Robert McCrum, writing for The Observer, included Brave New World chronologically at #53 in "the top 100 greatest novels of all time",[3] and the novel was listed at #87 on The Big Read survey by the BBC.[4] Title[edit] O wonder! Translations of the title often allude to similar expressions used in domestic works of literature: the French edition of the work is entitled Le Meilleur des mondes (The Best of All Worlds), an allusion to an expression used by the philosopher Gottfried Leibniz[7] and satirised in Candide, Ou l'Optimisme by Voltaire (1759). History[edit] Huxley said that Brave New World was inspired by the utopian novels of H. Plot[edit] Characters[edit] Bernard Marx, a sleep-learning specialist at the Central London Hatchery and Conditioning Centre. Benito Hoover, Another of Lenina's lovers.

Guy Fawkes Mask-ology Editor’s note: This is one of the most popular posts, traffic-wise, ever published on HiLobrow. Click here to see a list of the Top 25 Most Popular posts (as of October 2012); and click here for an archive of all of HiLobrow’s most popular posts. It’s a ubiquitous image now: in pictures from Occupy Wall Street, the Arab Spring, anti-SOPA/PIPA demonstrations, you see figures in Guy Fawkes masks. Since first entering the American cultural field via the lulzy culture of Anonymous, the Guy Fawkes mask has become a potent symbolic force in political activism. The Guy Fawkes mask is an old one, and its symbolic life has been complex. The mask and, to some extent, the historical figure of Guy Fawkes received a bit of rehabilitation via the 1982-89 comic book series V for Vendetta by Alan Moore and David Lloyd. A film adaptation of the comic book was released in March of 2006, directed by James McTeigue and starring Natalie Portman and Hugo Weaving.

Anonymous About Anonymous is an ad-hoc group of Internet users who are often associated with various hacktivist operations, including protests against Internet censorship, Scientology and government corruption. History Users of the anonymous image board 4chan, launched in late 2003, began using the term “Anonymous” when referring to themselves as a collective. User registration is not required on the site and users who do not identify themselves are given the label “Anonymous.” Hacktivist Comic Boook On January 22nd, 2014, the four part comic Hacktivist, based on Anonymous, was released. "The world knows Ed Hiccox and Nate Graft as the young, brilliant co-founders of YourLife, a social networking company that has changed the way the world connects with each other. Archaia plans to compile all four parts of the comic into one book by summer 2014. Operations The Great Habbo Raid Project Chanology Operation Lioncash ”) over portraits on banknotes and releasing them back into circulation. Operation YouTube

Pat Mills Pat Mills is a British comics writer and editor who, along with John Wagner, revitalised British boys comics in the 1970s, and has remained a leading light in British comics ever since. He has been called "the godfather of British comics".[1] Biography[edit] His next creation was the science fiction-themed weekly 2000 AD, launched in 1977. As with Battle and Action he developed most of the early series before handing them over to other writers. He took over the development of Judge Dredd when creator John Wagner temporarily walked out, and wrote many of the early stories, establishing the character and his world, before Wagner returned. He has had little success in American comics, with the exception of Marshal Law, a savage superhero satire published by Marvel Comics' Epic imprint in the late 1980s, drawn by O'Neill. In 1991 Mills launched Toxic! In 1995, he broke in the French market, one of his life's goals, with Sha, created with French artist Olivier Ledroit. Bibliography[edit]

Dragon Ball Dragon Ball Z details the continuing adventure of Goku as a young adult and father to his son Gohan. After learning he is a Saiyan, Goku dies and is revived after training in the afterlife under the god North Kaiō. Goku defends Earth from the Saiyans under Vegeta, and leaves Earth to ultimately defeat them again and the galactic tyrant Frieza. Three years later an evil life form called Cell holds a fighting tournament to decide the fate of the Earth. Goku sacrifices his own life and Gohan avenges his father by defeating Cell. Seven years later, Goku is revived and quickly drawn into a fight against a magical being named Majin Buu. Due to the success of the anime in America, the manga comprising Dragon Ball Z was released by Viz Media under the title Dragon Ball Z. Plot[edit] Production and Broadcasting[edit] English production and Broadcasting[edit] The Funimation dubbed episodes also aired in Canada, Ireland, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Belgium, Australia and New Zealand.

Nineteen Eighty-Four History and title[edit] A 1947 draft manuscript of the first page of Nineteen Eighty-Four, showing the editorial development. The Last Man in Europe was an early title for the novel but in a letter dated 22 October 1948 to his publisher Fredric Warburg, eight months before publication, Orwell wrote about hesitating between The Last Man in Europe and Nineteen Eighty-Four.[14] Warburg suggested changing the main title to a more commercial one.[15] Copyright status[edit] The novel will be in the public domain in the European Union and Russia in 2021 and in the United States in 2044.[21] It is already in the public domain in Canada;[22] South Africa,[23] Argentina[24] Australia,[25] and Oman.[26] Background[edit] The banner of the Party in the 1984 film adaptation of the book (I) the upper-class Inner Party, the elite ruling minority, who make up 2% of the population. As the government, the Party controls the population with four ministries: Plot[edit] Characters[edit] Principal characters[edit]

How Did Guy Fawkes Become a Symbol of Occupy Wall Street? Nov 5, 2011 8:05am Today is Guy Fawkes Day. In Great Britain, Guy Fawkes Day — and its post-meridian counterpart, Bonfire Night — have been celebrated every Nov. 5 for centuries, since soon after Fawkes’ death in 1605. In the lead-up to today, a Guy Fawkes mask spawned by the 2006 movie “V for Vendetta” has become the accessory of choice at Occupy Wall Street and similar protests around the world. So who was Guy Fawkes, and how did he become a symbol of protesters more than 400 years after his death? Guy Fawkes was a Catholic who, spurred by religious persecution, led a plot to blow up the Houses of Parliament and bring down England’s Protestant monarchy. He refused to name his co-conspirators, but they were caught anyway. Annual commemorations of the foiled plot began soon after, as reminders to defend England from other traitors, especially disloyal Catholics. “We shouldn’t burn the chap every 5 November but celebrate his attempt to blow up Parliament!”

Guy Fawkes Guy Fawkes (13 April 1570 – 31 January 1606), also known as Guido Fawkes, the name he adopted while fighting for the Spanish in the Low Countries, was a member of a group of provincial English Catholics who planned the failed Gunpowder Plot of 1605. Fawkes was born and educated in York. His father died when Fawkes was eight years old, after which his mother married a recusant Catholic. Fawkes later converted to Catholicism and left for the continent, where he fought in the Eighty Years' War on the side of Catholic Spain against Protestant Dutch reformers. Wintour introduced Fawkes to Robert Catesby, who planned to assassinate King James I and restore a Catholic monarch to the throne. Fawkes became synonymous with the Gunpowder Plot, the failure of which has been commemorated in Britain since 5 November 1605. Early life Childhood Fawkes was baptised at the church of St. Guy Fawkes was born in 1570 in Stonegate, York. Military career Gunpowder Plot Overseas Discovery Torture Trial and execution

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