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All of Me by John Legend

All of Me by John Legend
In this song John Legend uses opposite meanings to convey how he feels about his wife. It is a very ‘honest’ love song. I think it reflects real life rather than a fairytale version of a relationship. This provides a good opportunity for students to discuss love songs, identify the opposite meanings and then interpret what the songwriter really means. Students then use what they have learned to talk about their own loved ones. Materials: PowerPoint slides here , song on YouTube, slide 6 printed off and cut up 1/group , worksheet without explanations 1/pair here and worksheet with explanation 1/pair and cut up here. Level: Upper Intermediate + adults Procedure Warmer– Students discuss love songs. Personalise– Show slide 13. Do you teach IELTS? Do you Like this: Like Loading... Tagged with: All of Me, all of me lesson plan, Antithesis, Discussion, ELT, english, John Legend, John Legend Lesson Plan, lesson plan, Love Songs, lyrics, Opposite Meanings, teaching, TEFL Posted in Uncategorized

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Love is Blind - level 3 Hi Lang I’m going to write to you in English from now on because we both need the practice. Thanks for your email. Describing photos (comparing, contrasting and speculating) You are going to practise language for; Describing photosComparing and contrasting photos (discussing similarities and differences)Speculating on what might be happeningReacting to photos (giving opinions) Discuss Look at the presentation. Valentine by Carol Ann Duffy – a lesson It’s Valentine’s Day tomorrow, and although I don’t normally do anything for it, I thought that this year I would take the opportunity to share one of my favourite poems with my students. Here’s the plan in case you want to do it too. Ask your students what day it is, and whether anything special happens on this day in their country. What do they know about Valentine’s Day in the UK? What kind of gifts do people normally give for Valentine’s Day? Brainstorm them on the board.

Love is Blind - level 2 Hi Lang I’m writing in English because I know we both need to practise. Thanks for your last email. I’m sorry I didn’t write back sooner. How can film help you teach or learn English? What can film and video add to the learning experience? Kieran Donaghy, who won the British Council’s Teaching English blog award for his post I want to learn English because…, explains why film is such a good resource, and recommends some useful websites. Language teachers have been using films in their classes for decades, and there are a number of reasons why film is an excellent teaching and learning tool.

L.O.V.E. – activity/lesson plan St. Valentine’s day is approaching so here’s a lesson plan on the topic of love and friendship. Students warm up by playing a word game (stages 4-5) that encourages them to think deeper about what they read into a range of concepts related to love and friendship andpushes them to recall vocabulary on these topics Love is Blind - level 1 Hi Lang I’m writing in English to practise. I’m sorry I didn’t answer your email. Talk2Me English : My Valentine - A fun lesson for Valentine's day I discovered the song 'My Valentine' by Paul McCartney this week and thought it would be perfect for a Valentine's day lesson. The song is so romantic ♥ My lesson ended up being rather funny and very lively, I hope your students will enjoy it as much as mine did :-) Level: IntermediateLesson activities: Talking about Valentine's day, using sign language to learn vocabulary, listening practice and fill the blanks exercise. Warm up questions: 1. What do you know about Valentine's day?

3 activities for Valentine's day Whoops! You’ve completely forgotten that Valentine’s Day is round the corner and you haven’t planned anything with a romantic theme for your classes. Don’t panic – Here are 3 last-minute love lessons / activities for you to try which require very little preparation. TIP: Not all learners feel comfortable talking about their private lives and relationships. In order not to invade their privacy, you might want to ask them to create roles based on pictures. Briefly introduce the concept of ‘speed dating’.

Lost Property This EFL lesson is designed around a beautiful short film titled Lost Property by Asa Lucander. Students do a dictation, work out meanings of the verb ‘lose’, speak about lost items, watch a trailer and short film, and write a story. I would ask all teachers who use Film English to consider buying my book Film in Action as the royalties which I receive from sales help to keep the website completely free. Language level: Intermediate (B1) – Upper Intermediate (B2) Learner type: Teens and adults Time: 90 minutes Black Boy : richard wright <div style="padding:5px; font-size:80%; width:300px; background-color:white; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; border:1px dashed gray;"> Internet Archive's<!--'--> in-browser audio player requires JavaScript to be enabled. It appears your browser does not have it turned on.

The Consultants-E : EdTech Consultancy - WebQuest Repository Victoria Boobyer - A Digital FrankensteinThis webquest is aimed at students of Intermediate [B1] level and above and would supplement any Frankenstein-based project work or reading. Learners research topics based on Mary Shelley, the writing of Frankenstein and Frankenstein in movies. The writing tasks are similar to those found in the Cambridge English First (FCE) exams. It includes student and teacher assessment criteria. [ more... ] Sonja Tack – Africa in 2015: Where will Poverty and Hunger be?In this WebQuest, students read a variety of BBC news articles and consider the benefits and drawbacks of giving aid to African countries.

Show Us Your #SinglePointRubric The practice of using single point rubrics is slowly but surely catching on. The simplicity of these rubrics — with just a single column of criteria, rather than a full menu of performance levels — offers a whole host of benefits: Teachers find them easier and faster to create, because they no longer have to spend precious time thinking up all the different ways students could fail to meet expectations.Students find them easier to read when preparing an assignment. With only the target expectations to focus on, they are more likely to read those expectations.They allow for higher-quality feedback, because teachers must specify key problem areas and notable areas of excellence for that particular student, rather than choosing from a list of generic descriptions.

Look Up This EFL lesson is designed around a short film and poem by Gary Turk and the theme of isolation caused by the use of new technology. Students watch a short film with no sound and speculate about the story it tells, read a poem and discuss digital technology, social media and isolation. I would ask all teachers who use Film English to consider buying my book Film in Action as the royalties which I receive from sales help to keep the website completely free. Language level: Upper Intermediate (B2) – Advanced (C1) Learner type:Teens and adults Time: 90 minutes

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