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Ageing

Ageing
Ageing (British English) or aging (American English) is the accumulation of changes in a person over time.[1] Ageing in humans refers to a multidimensional process of physical, psychological, and social change. Some dimensions of ageing grow and expand over time, while others decline. Reaction time, for example, may slow with age, while knowledge of world events and wisdom may expand. Research shows that even late in life, potential exists for physical, mental, and social growth and development.[2] Ageing is an important part of all human societies reflecting the biological changes that occur, but also reflecting cultural and societal conventions. Ageing is among the largest known risk factors for most human diseases.[3] Roughly 100,000 people worldwide die each day of age-related causes.[4] Age is measured chronologically, and a person's birthday is often an important event. Population ageing is the increase in the number and proportion of older people in society. Senescence[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ageing

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Middle age Middle age is the period of age beyond young adulthood but before the onset of old age . Various attempts have been made to define this age, which is around the third quarter of the average life span of human beings . Definitions [ edit ] Generation Z Terminology[edit] USA Today sponsored an online contest for readers to choose the name of the next generation after the Millennials. In the article, Bruce Horovitz wrote that some might call the term "Generation Z" rather "off-putting" and a name that is "still in-the-running" for the next generation. The article proposed some alternate names including: iGeneration, Gen Tech, Gen Wii, Net Gen, Digital Natives, Gen Next, Post Gen.[1][3] In 2013, Jeanine Poggi reported in Ad Age that Nickelodeon channel is looking to serve a new breed of kids born after 2005 who it dubs "post-millennials".[2] "Scholars Generation" was proposed by a writer at A Time to Succeed coalition who "works to ensure that all children in the nation’s high-poverty communities have better learning time in school".[4]

Generation X Generation X, commonly abbreviated to Gen X, is the generation born after the Western Post–World War II baby boom. Demographers, historians and commentators use beginning birth dates from the early 1960s to the early 1980s. Origin and etymology[edit] Hungarian photographer Robert Capa initially referred to post-World War II youth as "Generation X" Douglas Coupland popularized the term "Generation X" in a novel about young adults and their lifestyles in the late 1980s. Data management Data management comprises all the disciplines related to managing data as a valuable resource. Overview[edit] The official definition provided by DAMA International, the professional organization for those in the data management profession, is: "Data Resource Management is the development and execution of architectures, policies, practices and procedures that properly manage the full data lifecycle needs of an enterprise." {{DAMA International}} This definition is fairly broad and encompasses a number of professions which may not have direct technical contact with lower-level aspects of data management, such as relational database management.

Tchotchke Tchotchke (/ˈtʃɒtʃkə/ CHOCH-ka)[1][2][3][4][5] is a small bauble or miscellaneous item. Depending on context, the term has a connotation of worthlessness or disposability as well as tackiness,[6][7] and has long been used by Jewish-Americans and in the regional speech of New York City and elsewhere. The word may also refer to free promotional items dispensed at trade shows, conventions, and similar large events. Also, stores that sell cheap souvenirs in tourist areas like Times Square, Venice Beach, and Waikiki Beach in Hawaii are sometimes called "tchotchke shops". Leo Rosten, author of The Joys of Yiddish, gives an alternate sense of tchotchke as meaning a desirable young girl, a "pretty young thing". Less flatteringly, the term could be construed as a more dismissive synonym for "bimbo".

Triarchic theory of intelligence Different components of information processing[edit] Schematic illustrating one trial of each stimulus pool in the Sternberg task: letter, word, object, spatial, grating. Sternberg associated the workings of the mind with a series of components. These components he labeled the metacomponents, performance components, and knowledge-acquisition components (Sternberg, 1985). The metacomponents are executive processes used in problem solving and decision making that involve the majority of managing our mind. Slouching Towards Bedlam Summary[edit] The player character awakens in an office in Bedlam Asylum. From context it appears that the character is Doctor Xavier, a doctor at the Asylum. The Doctor, however, has no memory of his past.

Cambridge University Press For the football club, see Cambridge University Press F.C.. Cambridge University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge. Granted letters patent by Henry VIII in 1534, it is the world's oldest publishing house, and the second largest university press in the world,[1][2] after that of Oxford University Press. The Press’s mission is to “To further the University’s mission by disseminating knowledge in the pursuit of education, learning and research at the highest international levels of excellence.”[3]

Sky & Telescope Sky & Telescope (S&T) is a monthly American magazine covering all aspects of amateur astronomy, including the following: The articles are intended for the informed lay reader and include detailed discussions of current discoveries, frequently by participating scientists. The magazine is illustrated in full color, with both amateur and professional photography of celestial sights, as well as tables and charts of upcoming celestial events. The magazine played an important role in the dissemination of knowledge about telescope making, through the column "Gleanings for ATMs" that ran from 1933 to 1990. See also[edit] References[edit] Space law Space law is an area of the law that encompasses national and international law governing activities in outer space. International lawyers have been unable to agree on a uniform definition of the term "outer space", although most lawyers agree that outer space generally begins at the lowest altitude above sea level at which objects can orbit the Earth, approximately 100 km (60 mi). The inception of the field of space law began with the launch of the world's first artificial satellite by the Soviet Union in October 1957. Named Sputnik 1, the satellite was launched as part of the International Geophysical Year. Since that time, space law has evolved and assumed more importance as mankind has increasingly come to use and rely on space-based resources.

Commercialization of space History[edit] The first commercial use of satellites may have been the Telstar 1 satellite, launched in 1962, which was the first privately sponsored space launch, funded by AT&T and Bell Telephone Laboratories. Telstar 1 was capable of relaying television signals across the Atlantic Ocean, and was the first satellite to transmit live television, telephone, fax, and other data signals.[2][3] Two years later, the Hughes Aircraft Company developed the Syncom 3 satellite, a geosynchronous communications satellite, leased to the Department of Defense. Commercial possibilities of satellites were further realized when the Syncom 3, orbiting near the International Date Line, was used to telecast the 1964 Olympic Games from Tokyo to the United States.[4][5] Between 1960 and 1966, NASA launched a series of early weather satellites known as Television Infrared Observation Satellites (TIROS). Subscription satellite services[edit]

Space colonization Space colonization (also called space settlement, or extraterrestrial colonization) is permanent human habitation that is not on Earth. Many arguments have been made for space colonization. The two most common ones are survival of human civilization and the biosphere from possible disasters (natural or man-made), and the huge resources in space for expansion of human society. However right now the challenges, both technological and economic, involved in building a space colony are as great as the potential payoff. Space settlements would have to provide for all the material needs of hundreds or thousands of humans in an environment out in space that is very hostile to human life. They would involve technologies, such as closed-loop life support systems, that have yet to be developed in any meaningful way.

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