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How language changes over time

How language changes over time
Now playing In this fun, short talk from TEDYouth, lexicographer Erin McKean encourages — nay, cheerleads — her audience to create new words when the existing ones won’t quite do. She lists out 6 ways to make new words in English, from compounding to “verbing,” in order to make language better at expressing what we mean, and to create more ways for us to understand one another.

http://www.ted.com/playlists/228/how_language_changes_over_time

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Activities for correcting writing in the language classroom How can teachers encourage learners to correct their own writing? Second-time winner of TeachingEnglish blog award, Cristina Cabal, offers a few tried and tested error-correction activities. Does every single writing error need to be corrected? In the learning of a second language, this is a question that stirs up great controversy.

The Lingua File: How French Gave English Its Sophisticated Words If you're familiar with the history of the British Isles, you'll be aware that before taking the English language on tour and invading 90% of the world (with varying degrees of success), the British were the whipping boys of Europe and every empire across Europe had a go of taking over Great Britain. This helps explain why the English language is widespread and has a diverse lexicon with roots in many different languages. What I find most interesting is the relationship between the origin of a word in English and its register. Words from Anglo-Saxon have taken their place in the lower registers of the English language, while "classier" high-register words come from both Latin and French. This all comes down to how the words were being used when they first made their way into the language.

Why is English so weirdly different from other langu... English speakers know that their language is odd. So do people saddled with learning it non-natively. The oddity that we all perceive most readily is its spelling, which is indeed a nightmare. In countries where English isn’t spoken, there is no such thing as a ‘spelling bee’ competition. Linguists are like, ‘Get used to it!’ In recent months, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand has used it; musician Buddy Guy has used it; Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson used it in grand jury testimony, as did his victim Michael Brown’s friend Dorian Johnson. A friend used it in an instant message chat to me, describing her attitude toward her sick boyfriend: “i’m like STAY OVER THERE.” It’s called the “quotative like,” and over the last 25 years, it’s become one of our language’s most popular methods of talking about talking. The use of “I’m like” or “he was like” to introduce a quote, a thought, or a feeling has spread through English worldwide, from Jamaica to New Zealand. One American dialect has rapidly adopted an even less by-the-book variation.

BusyTeacher.org Students love being able to understand and read current news in English and there is something to interest everyone in a newspaper. The average reading age for most newspapers is approximately 11-13 years old, just perfect for those learning English as a foreign language. Newspapers are also a handy resource for English language teachers. Speaking Activities On these pages you will find ideas for classsroom activities which involve speaking. (These tips are taken on this site · Find the murderer · Bingo mingle · Short projects to get them talking - Lists · Superlative questions President Obama & Marilynne Robinson: A Conversation—II by Barack Obama and Marilynne Robinson The following conversation between President Obama and Marilynne Robinson was conducted in Des Moines, Iowa, on September 14. An audio recording of the conversation can be heard at itunes.com/nybooks. The first part appeared in the November 5 issue of The New York Review.

7 Steps to Becoming a Confident Photographer: a Beginner's Guide - Digital Photography School Confidence is worth it’s weight in gold in any arena. As a photographer, there’s nothing like KNOWING you’re capable of “getting the shot.” It’s so empowering to know that if you miss a shot it’s NOT going to be because you didn’t know what you were doing OR perhaps worse would be that you did know how to nail it, but you were too slow in setting up the shot due to lack of practice! There are a katrillion ways to gain confidence in your abilities as a photographer. Here are a few that I have found to be incredibly helpful over the years.

A Point of View: Why do some people dislike hearing foreign languages in the street? 16 January 2015Last updated at 12:06 ET Unfamiliar words can make people feel uneasy, but embracing new languages is good for us, writes AL Kennedy. My grandmother was wonderful but unusual. » Teaching English through songs in the digital age – #ELTchat summary 12/01/... This absolutely fantastic summary was contributed by Vicky Saumell on her blog in 4 consective posts which I have merged into one single post. As Viky herself remarks below in her post, it is an amazing collection of resources all shared by you, #ELTchatters! What a fantastic resource this has turned into! And thanks to Vicky for an outstanding job!!! 1.

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