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Books worth reading, recommended by Bill Gates, Susan Cain and more

Books worth reading, recommended by Bill Gates, Susan Cain and more
Creativity Creative Confidence, by Tom Kelley and David Kelley Crown Business, 2013 Recommended by: Tim Brown (TED Talk: Designers — think big!) “‘Creative confidence’ is the creative mindset that goes along with design thinking’s creative skill set.”See more of Tim Brown’s favorite books. Creating Minds, by Howard Gardner Basic Books, 2011 Recommended by: Roselinde Torres (TED Talk: What it takes to be a great leader) “Gardner’s book was first published more than twenty years ago, but its insights into the creative process — told through the stories of seven remarkable individuals from different fields — remain just as relevant today. While they shared some traits, they all followed different paths to success.”See more of Roselinde Torres’ favorite books. Design Happiness Man’s Search for Meaning, by Viktor E. Your Money or Your Life, by Vicki Robin et al. Waking Up, Alive, by Richard A. History Language On the Shoulders of Giants, by Robert K. Philosophy Math and stats Medicine Mind and brain

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Teaching materials from the David Foster Wallace archive Teaching materials from the David Foster Wallace archive Share this page A small but significant portion of the David Foster Wallace archive represents his teaching career, from his graduate school years through to his work as a faculty member at Pomona College in the years before his death. 7 ways to practice emotional first aid You put a bandage on a cut or take antibiotics to treat an infection, right? No questions asked. In fact, questions would be asked if you didn’t apply first aid when necessary.

10-books-that-will-make-you-smarter-in-2015 Yes there's a small company in "A Christmas Carol." But you won't learn much studying the business practices of Ebenezer Scrooge and Jacob Marley. With the holiday break stretching before you, pick up (or download) one of these excellent 2014 titles instead. Life Advice from 50 Beloved Characters in Kid's Entertainment Embed this image on your site: "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." ~ George Bernard Shaw Life can be tough for us adults! Books to help you answer big questions about yourself Why in the world did I do that? How can I do better? Chances are you’ve asked yourself these questions at least once today. To understand how your mind works and how you can improve your decision-making, explore these six psychology and behavioral economics books, each one recommended by a TED Talks speaker.

The 8 Best Podcasts For Business-Savvy Listeners A new year inspires many business professionals and entrepreneurs to step up their game, either by learning new strategies, setting bigger goals for the year ahead, or making sure they are staying relevant in their industry. Podcasts are a great way to develop your professional skills by learning new strategies while also staying up to date on what is happening in the business and marketing world. According to the Washington Post, podcasts are experiencing a resurgence, likely because of their portability—they can be listened to in the car, during work, or even while exercising—and variety of topics and experts. The fact that the large majority is free has also inspired a new generation of listeners to start downloading them regularly again.

What Is Web 3.0, Really, and What Does It Mean for Education? The first rule of Web 3.0 is to stop calling it that. At least, that's Tim O'Reilly's preference. According to O'Reilly, whose media company is credited with coining the term Web 2.0, "it was never meant as a version number." Rather, the expression "was about the return of the web after the dot-com bust," he explains. 11 must-see TED-Ed lessons Short animated lessons you’ll love, from atomic structure to the science of stage fright (and how to overcome it). Bite-size snacks of knowledge, TED-Ed Video Lessons are short, free educational videos written by educators and students, then animated by some of the most creative minds in the business. The topics of these addictive little videos range from quantum physics to the art of beatboxing, and once you watch one, you may want to watch 10 more. Know an animator or educator who could make a great TED-Ed Lesson? Nominate them here. Find a lesson you love?

Fixed vs. Growth: The Two Basic Mindsets That Shape Our Lives “If you imagine less, less will be what you undoubtedly deserve,” Debbie Millman counseled in one of the best commencement speeches ever given, urging: “Do what you love, and don’t stop until you get what you love. Work as hard as you can, imagine immensities…” Far from Pollyanna platitude, this advice actually reflects what modern psychology knows about how belief systems about our own abilities and potential fuel our behavior and predict our success. Much of that understanding stems from the work of Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck, synthesized in her remarkably insightful Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (public library) — an inquiry into the power of our beliefs, both conscious and unconscious, and how changing even the simplest of them can have profound impact on nearly every aspect of our lives. One of the most basic beliefs we carry about ourselves, Dweck found in her research, has to do with how we view and inhabit what we consider to be our personality.

7 Lessons for Teachers from Dumbledore One of my favorite times of the day is when I settle in with my two young daughters for read-aloud time. For several years, we have been working our way through the Harry Potter series. I had read them all before, but it has been a delight to read them again with my girls, using as many voices as possible, and seeing the incredible story through their eyes. Susan Cain on why it’s ok to eat alone What was it like giving a TED Talk, as opposed to some of the other talks you’ve given? It was a lot scarier, for one thing. So how did you get through that?

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