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Cellphones in the Classroom: Distraction or Tool?

Cellphones in the Classroom: Distraction or Tool?
The final version of the National Education Technology Plan (NETP) was released last week, setting forth the Obama Administration's plan for improving access to and integration of technologies for teaching and learning. Among the recommendations the Department of Education makes in the NETP is a call for support for "efforts to ensure that all students and educators have 24/7 access to the Internet via devices, including mobile devices, and that states, districts, and schools adopt technologies and policies to enable leveraging the technology that students already have." The push for "24/7 access to the Internet" falls under another the auspices of yet another endeavor, the National Broadband Plan. But the call for better access to Internet-ready devices, particularly utilizing tools the students already possess is an interesting one. Because the device that is ubiquitous for American students isn't the desktop computer or the notebook or the netbook or the iPad. It's the cellphone.

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The "BYOD" Debate - Educational Technology for School Leaders 1. Cost Effective way to increase technology in schools. (ALM)"It goes without saying the a BYOD policy allows a district to get closer to a 1 to 1 device ratio without incurring the costs of a 1 to 1 program." - Oak Hills Portfolio, Cincinnati. Oak Hills Portfolio More schools allowing students to bring smart phones, tablets to the classroom At a school district outside Chicago, students participated in a French class by using cellphones to call classmates and speak with them in French. And when school starts this fall at Mason High School near Cincinnati, students like Mrudu Datla will pack iPads and iPhones in their backpacks. "(Using technology in everyday life is) not that new to us because we grew up with technology," Datla, a sophomore, said. Although schools have traditionally banned or limited cellphones in the classroom, 73% of Advanced Placement and National Writing Project teachers said their students use phones in the classroom or to complete assignments, according to a Pew Research Center study released in February. "Teachers are starting to take advantage of the opportunities of cellphones in the classroom," said George Fornero, superintendent of Township High School District 113, located outside Chicago, whose school system has begun allowing its students use cellphones.

Is the Cell Phone the New Pencil? It is commonplace to bemoan the poor writing skills of students today. Yes, there is no question that writing effectively is difficult. Yes, it is true that we don't provide enough high quality writing instruction (writing is known as the "forgotten R"). How to Use Cell Phones as Learning Tools Does your staff need Educational Technology training? The K-12 Teachers Alliance can help you plan your in-service professional development at no additional cost. Regardless of your school’s cell phone policy, the reality in most schools is that students have phones in their pockets, purses, or hoodies.

Using Smartphones in the Classroom By Edward Graham Found in: Advice and Support Ken Halla knows a thing or two about using technology in the classroom. Smart phones require smart communication strategies By Nora Carr, APR, Fellow PRSARead more by October 10th, 2012 When parents perceive a communication void, they will work to fill it, by creating their own mobile apps or alternative social media sites. With as many as 49 percent of all U.S. adults using smart phones, according to Nielsen reports, it’s time to get smart about school communications as well. Today’s on-the-go parents, teachers, and principals require fast, easy access to news and information. In most cases, this requires access to stripped-down mobile websites or special applications (apps) designed for smaller screens and sometimes sketchy wireless internet connections. Smart-phone use is nearly ubiquitous among young American adults.

Learn2luvcell: A Powerful Multipurpose Mechanism for Learning Query most secondary school teachers on the subject of cell phones, and you're likely to get an impassioned rant about the device's insidious ability to provoke distraction in the classroom. All that giggly sub rosa texting not only robs students of attentiveness, they say, but also presents an inveterate disciplinary problem. It's why most school districts have strict cell phone policies, and most teachers are grateful for it. But some forward-looking educators have begun to push the subversive idea that the high tech wizardry of mobile phones can be a powerful multipurpose mechanism for learning. Mobile Learning Support for New Teachers The mobile learning revolution is alive and growing in popularity every day. When schools move toward mobile learning in the classroom, they can take advantage of electronic devices such as tablets and cell phones that offer portability and ease of use. Mobile learning technologies can offer teachers a flexible approach to learning with their students in a variety of locations, and encourage this learning to continue at home. As schools begin to consider the movement towards mobile learning, it's important to support teachers with strategies for success, particularly if they are new.

Why Mobile Learning Apps Are The Future of Education Mobile learning apps and students, they exist like the original odd couple. On one hand you have the app, trendy, cool, ever evolving and students just love them. On the other hand you have exams, study and lots of learning; things that students are not so fond of. However, for some strange reason, when we combine the two, students become a lot more receptive and even more willing to learn. Success!

Smartphones: From Toy to Tool In classrooms, smartphones are slowly shifting out of the toy-and-liability-to-attention category, and into the tool-and-engaging-students category. It's part of the movement to "meet students where they are" that's being embraced by teachers who believe in a non-standardized approach to education. Jeremy Mettler, social studies teacher at Batavia (New York) High School, puts it this way: "Students all have them and they love using them, but they don't realize they're walking around with a computer in their pocket." Yet computers, helpful as they are, can be a distraction. So how do you incorporate smartphones into the teaching process without compromising the learning process? I talked to a number of teachers around the country to see how they're addressing this challenge.

Cons of Cell Phones in School There are numerous arguments against allowing cell phones in school. The source of much public debate, the issue of whether to allow children and teens to bring their mobile phones to school has been discussed and debated at length across the country, but even now, there is no clear-cut answer or conclusion. Six Potential Problem With Cell Phones in School There are many arguments against allowing cell phones in the classroom. Six of the most frequently cited arguments against mobile phones in school are: 1. Do Cell Phones Belong in the Classroom? Mobile devices are ubiquitous in American high schools, and their use is harder to regulate than old-fashioned note passing. But here's why teachers should be paying closer attention. Two U.S. high school students compete in the LG Mobile Worldcup Texting Championship. According to a Pew study, American teenage girls send an average of 100 messages a day. (Reuters)

Watters, A. (2010, November 15). Cellphones in the Classroom: Distraction or Tool? Retrieved February 5, 2015, from by delaneyclodfelter Feb 8

Watters, Audry. "Cellphones in the Classroom: Distraction or Tool?" November 15, 2010. Online. readwrite.com. by rjmccutcheon Feb 4

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