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Edutopia

Edutopia
In the education world, the term student-centered classroom is one we hear a lot. And many educators would agree that when it comes to 21st-century learning, having a student-centered classroom is certainly a best practice. Whether you instruct first grade or university students, take some time to think about where you are with creating a learning space where your students have ample voice, engage frequently with each other, and are given opportunities to make choices. Guiding Questions Use these questions to reflect on the learning environment you design for students: In what ways do students feel respected, feel valued, and feel part of the whole group? Balancing Teacher Roles So let's talk about that last question, and specifically, direct instruction versus facilitation. Facilitation: open-ended questioning, problem posing, Socratic seminar, and guided inquiry Direct instruction: demonstration, modeling, and lecturing Coaching: providing feedback, conferencing, and guided practice

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/how-student-centered-your-classroom-rebecca-alber

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How the Power of Interest Drives Learning Teaching Strategies Peninsula Park In recent years researchers have begun to build a science of interest, investigating what interest is, how interest develops, what makes things interesting, and how we can cultivate interest in ourselves and others. 50 Alternatives To Lecturing 50 Alternatives To Lecturing by TeachThought Staff Ed note: This post is promoted by SEU’S online masters in education programs. SEU simply asked us to write about how learning is changing and the updated kinds of things teachers need to know, and to let you know about their program. So here we are. As teachers, when we lecture, we have the best of intentions.

Toxic Nostalgia Breeds Derangement So much of the culture feels stuck. Social media creates a sense of eternal present; things that happened two weeks ago feel like half-forgotten history. Internet technology, once imbued with futuristic idealism, has become a source of destruction and dread. Fashion has turned back to the 1990s, which was itself a time of nostalgia for the 1970s. Cinemas are full of remakes. At least when the Sex Pistols screamed “No future,” they were sublimating nihilism into art. Students Tell All: What It’s Like to Be Trusted Partners in Learning Inquiry-based learning is not a new pedagogy, but it has come back into fashion in progressive education circles recently because of new emphasis on the power of students’ innate curiosity to drive learning. Inquiry-based learning asks students to discover knowledge on their own with guidance from their teachers. Rather than receiving information up front through lectures, students research guiding questions, ask their own follow-ups and get help along the way. Learning through inquiry requires more student agency and demands that teachers and administrators trust that students will ask when they need help. It also places the responsibility for completing tasks and meeting deadlines on the shoulders of students.

Library: 10 Learning Models & Frameworks TeachThought Library: 10 Learning Models & Frameworks by TeachThought Staff For professional development around these ideas, contact us. As with any publication, blogs and websites are only as thoughtful as their design. Jane Jacobs and the Problem of Monstrous Hybrids I recently finished reading Systems of Survival. Written by Jane Jacobs, who is best known for her 1961 masterpiece The Death and Life of Great American Cities, it's a meditation on what she calls the "moral syndromes" that drive human societies. Jacobs uses the term "syndrome" not in the medical sense, but in the more generic sense of "things that go together." There are two basic strategies for survival: taking and trading. That is, we can forcibly take what we need from other people, or we can trade what we have (including our labor) for things we need. Jacobs argues that each of the two strategies for survival has a corresponding "moral syndrome"—a cluster of related values that define virtuous behavior for people who survive in that fashion.

How One Teacher Changed for the Good of Her Students The excerpt below is from the book “Passionate Learners: Giving Our Classrooms Back to Our Students,” by Pernille Ripp. This excerpt is from the chapter entitled “When Change Happens to Good Teachers.” Four years ago, I realized that I needed to take responsibility for the damage I had done to students who came into my room loving (or at least liking) school and left diminished in some ways. Those kids who loved math until my long-winded lectures about process left them confused and bitter.

The Inside-Out School: A 21st Century Learning Model The Inside-Out School: A 21st Century Learning Model by Terry Heick As a follow-up to our 9 Characteristics of 21st Century Learning we developed in 2009, we have developed an updated framework, The Inside-Out Learning Model. The goal of the model is simple enough–not pure academic proficiency, but instead authentic self-knowledge, diverse local and global interdependence, adaptive critical thinking, and adaptive media literacy. By design this model emphasizes the role of play, diverse digital and physical media, and a designed interdependence between communities and schools.

Wicked problem A wicked problem is a problem that is difficult or impossible to solve because of incomplete, contradictory, and changing requirements that are often difficult to recognize. It refers to an idea or problem that can not be fixed, where there is no single solution to the problem. The use of the term "wicked" here has come to denote resistance to resolution, rather than evil.[1] Another definition is "a problem whose social complexity means that it has no determinable stopping point".[2] Moreover, because of complex interdependencies, the effort to solve one aspect of a wicked problem may reveal or create other problems. Characteristics[edit] Rittel and Webber's 1973 formulation of wicked problems in social policy planning specified ten characteristics:[4] Conklin later generalized the concept of problem wickedness to areas other than planning and policy; Conklin's defining characteristics are:[6]

Why Trust Is A Crucial Ingredient in Shaping Independent Learners Preparing students to be “college and career ready” is a catch phrase in many schools, but those same institutions often block large swaths of the internet in an attempt to protect students from acting inappropriately online. While well-intentioned, blocking useful digital tools prevents educators from guiding students through appropriate online behavior while still in the relative safety of school. College and job recruiters are seeking students who are creative problem solvers, collaborative workers and independent thinkers, but in many cases, rules prevent students from practicing those skills online.

20 Observable Characteristics Of Effective Teaching - 20 Observable Characteristics Of Effective Teaching by TeachThought Staff What makes an effective teacher? Or more specifically, what observable characteristics might you see and hear? The University of Minnesota offered some observable characteristics of effective teaching which, while focused on teacher actions rather than student learning, had some useful tips–not so much how to teach generally, but specific actions that you can use tomorrow. Changing What We Teach Changing What We Teach: Shifting From A Curriculum Of Insecurity To A Curriculum Of Wisdom by Terry Heick Increasingly, the idea of computer coding is being pushed to the forefront of “things.” In movies, on the news, and other digital avatars of ourselves, coders are increasingly here. In Hollywood, computer coders are characterized as aloof and spectacle geniuses in green army jackets who solve (narrative) problems in a kind of deus ex machina fashion. Hack the mainframe, change the school grades, save prom, etc.

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