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Rethinking Education

Rethinking Education
Related:  Professional Development and Professional Growth

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Michael Wesch Michael Lee Wesch (born June 22, 1975) is associate professor of cultural anthropology at Kansas State University. Wesch's work also includes media ecology and the emerging field of digital ethnography, where he studies the effect of new media on human interaction. Wesch is a cultural anthropologist and media ecologist exploring the effects of new media on human interaction. To this end, Wesch launched the Digital Ethnography Working Group, a team of undergraduates exploring human uses of digital technology. Wesch's videos are part of his broader efforts to pursue the possibilities of digital media to extend and transform the way ethnographies are presented. Currently he is the coordinator for the Peer Review of Teaching Project at Kansas State University, part of a broader nation-wide consortium of universities pursuing new ways to improve and evaluate student learning. Further reading[edit] External links[edit] References[edit] ^ Jump up to: a b "2008 National Winners".

L'ISC EN EQUATEUR IN*SITEnetwork 360VR Images - 360 Degree Virtual Reality interactive panoramic photography for virtual tours Digital citizenship, online safety & civility Embrace Civility Only2Clicks - speed dial to favorite web site and make it your start page About the Fair Use | U.S. Copyright Office U.S. Copyright Office Fair Use Index Welcome to the U.S. The Fair Use Index tracks a variety of judicial decisions to help both lawyers and non-lawyers better understand the types of uses courts have previously determined to be fair—or not fair. The Fair Use Index is designed to be user-friendly. Although the Fair Use Index should prove helpful in understanding what courts have to date considered to be fair or not fair, it is not a substitute for legal advice. We hope you find the Fair Use Index a helpful resource. Please note that the Copyright Office is unable to provide specific legal advice to individual members of the public about questions of fair use.

It’s all C.R.A.P.: Four Principles of Design | THINKblog What a bunch of C.R.A.P.! There are four principles of design that we want you to get under your belt. If you’re a designer, you’ll know this stuff already. If you’re a programmer, you might not. What’s important to understand is that if you can get these 4 principles under your belt, then over time you’ll develop a feel for why designs don’t work, and you’ll identify that really, really fast. It’s like you’ll have some secret superpower. Watch the video, read the stuff below, and suggestion: if you haven’t ever seen this stuff before, print it out, put it on the wall, and absorb! The 4 Principles of Design Follow these four rules for better design! C. is for Contrast. Creating contrast for elements means that discrete elements stand out. R. is for Repetition. Repetition, for instance making a header and footer the same color, makes scanning a website easier. A. is for Alignment. Columns within a page makes it easier to scan horizontally. P. is for Proximity. – Gregory and Mark

Standards Education technology standards to transform learning and teaching The time for major change in education is now. In a world where rapid advances in technology have a profound impact on the ways we work, communicate and live, education has struggled to keep pace. The ISTE Standards work together to support educators, students and leaders with clear guidelines for the skills and knowledge necessary to move away from the factory model. Empowering connected learners in a connected world As educators, we are preparing students for a future that we cannot yet imagine. Want to know more? How can the ISTE Standards be used? Visit permissions and licensing.

Adaptive Computer Technology The Blind Readers' Page--Main Menu This list includes the most comprehensive sources of information about adaptive computer technology for people with all sorts of disabilities, especially those with visual handicaps. It excludes links to individual manufacturers and vendors because they can be easily found by entering the larger portal sites, like those, among many others, of the American Foundation for the Blind and the National Federation of the Blind. I also have a set of links to manufacturers and vendors in "Index to Adaptive Computer Hardware and Software." ACCESS NET, a project of the Oklahoma Developmental Disabilities Council, has an extensive list of sites for accessible computer hardware and software. "Access Review," from the Sensory Access Foundation," provides reviews of hardware and software in addition to discussions of accessibility in general. The Abledata database covers a very broad range of adaptive equipment and tools useful for people with all sorts of disabilities.

World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Interactive Learning Sites for Education - Home

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