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What the Heck Is Project-Based Learning?

What the Heck Is Project-Based Learning?
You know the hardest thing about teaching with project-based learning? Explaining it to someone. It seems to me that whenever I asked someone the definition of PBL, the description was always so complicated that my eyes would begin to glaze over immediately. So to help you in your own musings, I've devised an elevator speech to help you clearly see what's it all about. PBL: The Elevator Speech An elevator speech is a brief, one- or two-sentence response you could give someone in the amount of time it takes to go from the first floor to the second floor in an apartment building. So the elevator opens up, a guy walks in and out of the blue asks you, "What the heck is project-based learning anyway?" You respond accordingly: "PBL is the act of learning through identifying a real-world problem and developing its solution. "That's it?" "Well, no," you reply. After all, if we just look at that definition, it doesn't state certain trends in PBL. A More Elaborate Response

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/what-heck-project-based-learning-heather-wolpert-gawron

Related:  PBL / InquiryPBL (ABP)ED ToolsProject Based LearningPBL

Personalized PBL: Start With Senior Projects For a while now parts of our nation, and certainly the New Tech Network (NTN), have been talking about “quality education for all.” It’s a good idea, but if you want to bring it to the place where the work really occurs–with the student–then we also ought to be talking about “quality education for each.” This was the idea–quality education for all and each–that opened up the New Tech Annual Conference in Orlando. Jim May pointed out something that I think is important to hold: that while the conference was themed with personalized learning, NTN is not saying that it has all the answers, or a recipe for the practice. PBL Pilot: Apps, Tips, and Tricks Editor's Note: Matt Weyers and co-author Jen Dole, teachers at Byron Middle School in Byron, Minnesota, present the seventh installment in a year-long series documenting their experience of launching a PBL pilot program. Project-based learning is a complex teaching method that, in our experience, requires a clear and established workflow to seamlessly accommodate the needs of teachers, parents, and students. Throughout this school year, we have found several apps, add-ons, and programs that have helped us best manage our workflow. Before we provide brief descriptions and links to each of them, it is important to state the current situation in our classroom: Students in our classes have individual iPads to use during the school day (they stay at school). Every student has a school-generated Gmail account.

ESL English Listening & Adult Literacy - News - Audiobooks - Songs - Radio Dramas The Tunnel Under The World by Frederik Pohl Guy Burckhardt wakes up screaming, but can't remember the nightmare that caused his fright. Slowly over the next couple of days he comes to realize he's been reliving the same day over and over. And things only get stranger and more frightening from there. Six Steps for Planning a Successful Project Sure, King Middle School has some amazing projects, but the Portland school has been refining its expeditionary learning projects for nearly two decades. David Grant, who guides the school's technology integration and curriculum development, has put together a six-step rubric for designing a project. He says Fading Footprints, which became a model for King and Expeditionary Learning Schools, doesn't take an entire school, or even a team of twelve, to plan and carry out; one or two teachers can tailor this one to fit their time and resources. Six Steps to Planning a Project The Fading Footsteps project is a twelve-week interdisciplinary ecology unit centered around the guiding question: How does diversity strengthen an ecosystem?

Using Google Tools in Project-Based Learning Infographic Teacher Infographics Using Google Tools in Project-Based Learning Infographic Using Google Tools in Project-Based Learning Infographic Project-based learning is a dynamic approach in which students actively explore real-world problems and challenges and acquire a deeper knowledge. Project-based learning should be student-driven, with a real-world connection. Tech Tip: Use project-based learning to support student voice, engagement Student-centered classrooms foster engagement and authentic learning. These environments allow students to have voice in their learning, plus explore and create in ways that the traditional lecture-based classroom can't match. One project we did this year involved having the students identify a problem from their lives and come up with a way to solve it using technology.

Connect Fours - Quiz Template from ClassTools.net You will see a wall of 16 clues. You need to group them into 4 rows of 4 connected items. Simply click four cards to identify a group. You score 1 point for each group found within 2.5 minutes. You have unlimited guesses for the first two groups. Using Google Classroom to Support PBL Project Based Learning has been a revelation for me. It is the first instructional “plate” I have encountered that simultaneously blends significant content and 21st century skills, and meets my teaching philosophy. I have come to believe however, that utilizing the PBL “plate” with my sixth graders is akin to going through a buffet line at your favorite restaurant. Without a predetermined method of organization, your food (or instructional) choices run together into a cluttered mess impossible to separate. I knew I needed to find a way to organize my project into a singular entity that did not cause my appetizer (entry event), main course (significant content) and dessert (final presentations) to become confusing and inaccessible for kids.

What Project-Based Learning Is — and What It Isn’t Screenshot/High Tech High The term “project-based learning” gets tossed around a lot in discussions about how to connect students to what they’re learning. Teachers might add projects meant to illustrate what students have learned, but may not realize what they’re doing is actually called “project-oriented learning.” Why Do So Many Schools Want to Implement Project Based Learning, But So Few Actually Do? In a world where so much knowledge is a two-second search away, many schools are losing interest in models that promote static learning to know. They’re looking to embrace dynamic models that promote learning to do and learning to be. Project-Based Learning (PBL) allows learners to develop skills by solving meaningful, real-world challenges , i.e. organizing a 5k race to raise money for charity or writing and performing a play on the colonization of Mars.

Movie Lessons From Cool Runnings Photo credit (above): Charles LeBlanc | Flickr By SARAH TAN “Feel the rhythm! Feel the rhyme! Get on up, it’s bobsled time! 3 Types Of Project-Based Learning Symbolize Its Evolution Project-Based Learning is an increasingly popular trend in the 21st century. The best evidence for this popularity might be the nuance it’s taken on. Project-Based Learning has gone from academic study that yields end-of-unit projects, to highly complex methods of creating and publishing student thinking. It is more closely associated with 21st century learning skills than perhaps any other form of learning, and new technology in the classroom is improving its potential exponentially. The Definition Of Project-Based Learning Broadly speaking, Project-Based Learning is simply a method of structuring curriculum around projects.

"Fitting In" PBL Regularly, teachers tell me that they don't feel as though they have time for project-based learning (PBL). While they like the idea in theory, they can't see a way to realistically "fit it in" with their curriculum given constraints of time, testing, standards, etc. A regular response to the concept of PBL is: "It sounds great, but. . . " Too often, they see it as a manufactured experience that results in the construction of a massive project and requires enormous amounts of class time. However, I believe that this is often because the emphasis is on the final product rather than the instructional strategy. The true focus of PBL is encouraging students to engage in inquiry, explore real-world contexts, and share their learning with others.

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