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Fiction Friday: 8 Things Writers Forget When Writing Fight Scenes

Fiction Friday: 8 Things Writers Forget When Writing Fight Scenes
Recently, I attended VCON, a science fiction and fantasy conference in Surrey (part of Metro Vancouver) and attended a session called “Writing About Fighting.” The panel consisted of writers and experts who were disciplined in multiple martial arts, including authors Lorna Suzuki and T.G. Shepherd, and Devon Boorman, the swordmaster of Academie Duello in Vancouver. (I lost my program, so if you remember who else was there, please leave it in the comments, below) For me, this talk was so fascinating, it was worth the cost of admission to VCON. In fact, I spent days thinking about the topics discussed and tried to incorporate them into The Watcher Saga. 1. First of all, if you’re not technical and don’t know the details of fighting, you shouldn’t try to write about them. Moreover, if you don’t feel comfortable or knowledgeable about fighting, don’t make your main character an expert on the subject. Some authors who write fight scenes well are: 2. 3. Battle scenes are truly disgusting. 4.

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