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Why I Am Not a Maker - The Atlantic

Why I Am Not a Maker - The Atlantic
Every once in a while, I am asked what I “make.” A hack day might require it, or a conference might ask me to describe “what I make” so it can go on my name tag. I’m always uncomfortable with it. I’m uncomfortable with any culture that encourages you take on an entire identity, rather than to express a facet of your own identity ("maker," rather than "someone who makes things"). But I have much deeper concerns. An identity built around making things—of being “a maker”—pervades technology culture. I understand where the motivation for this comes from. But there are more significant issues, rooted in the social history of who makes things—and who doesn’t. Walk through a museum. Making is not a rebel movement, scrappy individuals going up against the system. It’s not, of course, that there’s anything wrong with making (although it’s not all that clear that the world needs more stuff). I am not a maker.

http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/01/why-i-am-not-a-maker/384767/

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