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Every Photo Tells a Story/writing prompts/writers block

Every Photo Tells a Story/writing prompts/writers block

Six Word Stories Five Card Flickr Cliche Finder Have you been searching for just the right cliché to use? Are you searching for a cliché using the word "cat" or "day" but haven't been able to come up with one? Just enter any words in the form below, and this search engine will return any clichés which use that phrase... Over 3,300 clichés indexed! What exactly is a cliche? This is Morgan, creator of the Cliche Finder. Or, you might like my crazy passion project: Spanish for Nerds: Learning Spanish via Etymologies! Back to cliches... if you would like to see some other Web sites about clichés? © S. Special thanks to Damien LeriAnd to Mike Senter Morgan's Web page

5 Questions to Ask Your Characters | Book-in-a-Week Many writing workshops start their sessions on character development with a sheet detailing the hero’s name, age, eye color and hair color. They then move onto his job, his hobbies, and his family background. Next they might add a picture from the Internet or a magazine which looks a little like the hero, and perhaps an image of his home or workplace. This is all useful information, and great for keeping track of details so you do not find them changing as you write. However, these are not always the most important questions. These questions can be answered in different ways. The best questions to ask about your characters are ones that will take you away from the predictable paths of family, schooling and employment, so that when you return to their everyday world, you find it enriched by the knowledge you have gained. What keeps your protagonist awake at night? If you find prompts like these helpful, Peter Elbow has a very extensive list in his guide Writing With Power . Follow Me:

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A creative writing activity: A dark and stormy night Submitted 48 years 7 months ago by admin. This is an idea I learned when I first started teaching and still use to this day. The main focus of the activity is on developing writing skills, but it's also good for developing listening and reading skills and also for practising past tenses and descriptive vocabulary. The activity should work at most levels above elementary, as long as your students have some knowledge of past tenses, but it works best when they also know past continuous / progressive too. All you need to get things started is a sheet of plain paper for each pair of students. The listening part comes first: Ask the students to draw the face of a person in the top right-hand corner of the page. In this way they build up a character profile for the person they are going to write about. The writing part: Now dictate the following sentence to your students: 'It was a dark and stormy night and'. Follow up: Nik Peachey, Teacher, Trainer, Materials writer, British Council

Anki - friendly, intelligent flashcards Character and Characterisation in the Novel How to write convincing characters Characterisation - the task of building characters - isn't easy. But if you're struggling to build characters with real life and vigour, here is our very own patented technique. If you haven't yet started your book, then work on the exercise below before you start. If you have started, but think that maybe you started prematurely, then back up, do the exercise and then look back over your existing work. Oh, and don't feel patronised at being given exercises. Learning to know your characters Strong characterisation is based on knowledge. The Ultimate Character Builder Begin with a blank sheet (or screen). You should aim to cover at least five pages with this exercise. The less central a character is to your book, the less you need to know him/her. And the exercise will work. Checking your work Once you've got a fair way into your writing (say 5 to 10,000 words), then look back at it. Even genre fiction needs swiftly drawn, believable characters.

Omniglot - the guide to languages, alphabets and other writing systems Character Chart for Fiction Writers - EpiGuide.com If you're a fiction writer -- whether you're working on a novel, short story, screenplay, television series, play, web series, webserial, or blog-based fiction -- your characters should come alive for your reader or audience. The highly detailed chart below will help writers develop fictional characters who are believable, captivating, and unique. Print this page to complete the form for each main character you create. IMPORTANT: Note that all fields are optional and should be used simply as a guide; character charts should inspire you to think about your character in new ways, rather than constrain your writing. Fill in only as much info as you choose. If this character chart is helpful, please let us know! Looking for more character questionnaires / charts?

creative writing prompts . com ideas for writers Baby Names at BabyNames.com | Baby Name Meanings | Baby Boy Names | Baby Girl Names | Top Most Popular Names Make This: A Luminous Faceted Pendant Light » Curbly | DIY Design Community « Keywords: DIY, pendant, lighting, paper Remember those folded up fortune-tellers from your elementary school days? Some kids called them cootie-catchers, but I never really understood the method behind the madness with that one. But I digress, because paper folding prowess was not in vain. Take a longing glance at this beautiful DIY faceted pendant sphere, completely covered in small fortune tellers! Tagged : pendant, lighting, paper, DIY Creative Writing | Visual Writing Prompts Not even sure this one is a great idea.

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