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HDMI

HDMI
HDMI (High-Definition Multimedia Interface) is a proprietary audio/video interface for transferring uncompressed video data and compressed or uncompressed digital audio data from an HDMI-compliant source device, such as a display controller, to a compatible computer monitor, video projector, digital television, or digital audio device.[1] HDMI is a digital replacement for analog video standards. HDMI implements the EIA/CEA-861 standards, which define video formats and waveforms, transport of compressed, uncompressed, and LPCM audio, auxiliary data, and implementations of the VESA EDID.[2][3] CEA-861 signals carried by HDMI are electrically compatible with the CEA-861 signals used by the digital visual interface (DVI). Several versions of HDMI have been developed and deployed since initial release of the technology but all use the same cable and connector. History[edit] Specifications[edit] Audio/video[edit] Uncompressed video[edit] Communication channel protocols[edit] DDC[edit] TMDS[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HDMI

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Post-WIMP The reason WIMP interfaces have become so prevalent since their conception at Xerox PARC is that they are very good at abstracting work-spaces, documents, and their actions. Their analogous paradigm to documents as paper sheets or folders makes WIMP interfaces easy to introduce to other users.[1] Furthermore their basic representations as rectangular regions on a 2D flat screen make them a good fit for system programmers, thus favouring the abundance of commercial widget toolkits in this style. However WIMP interfaces are not optimal for working with complex tasks such as computer-aided design, working on large amounts of data simultaneously, or interactive games. WIMPs are usually pixel-hungry, so given limited screen real estate they can distract attention from the task at hand. Thus, custom interfaces can better encapsulate workspaces, actions, and objects for specific complex tasks. Examples[edit]

DisplayPort DisplayPort is a digital display interface developed by the Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA). The interface is primarily used to connect a video source to a display device such as a computer monitor, though it can also be used to carry audio, USB, and other forms of data.[2] The VESA specification is royalty-free. VESA designed it to replace VGA, DVI, and FPD-Link. Internet protocol suite The Internet protocol suite is the computer networking model and set of communications protocols used on the Internet and similar computer networks. It is commonly known as TCP/IP, because its most important protocols, the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and the Internet Protocol (IP), were the first networking protocols defined in this standard. Often also called the Internet model, it was originally also known as the DoD model, because the development of the networking model was funded by DARPA, an agency of the United States Department of Defense.

Shearing (manufacturing) Low alloy steel is used in low production of materials that range up to 0.64 cm (1/4 in) thickHigh-carbon, high chromium steel is used in high production of materials that also range up to 0.64 cm (1/4 in) in thicknessShock-resistant steel is used in materials that are equal to 0.64 cm (1/4 in) thick or more When shearing a sheet, the typical tolerance is +0.1 or -0.1, but it is feasible to get the tolerance to within +0.005 or -0.005. While shearing a bar and angle, the typical tolerance is +0.06 or -0.06, but it is possible to get the tolerance to +0.03 or -0.03. Surface finishes typically occur within the 250 to 1000 microinches range, but can range from 125 to 2000 microinches. A secondary operation is required if one wants better surfaces than this. Degarmo, E.

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Vitruvius Marcus Vitruvius Pollio (born c. 80–70 BC, died after c. 15 BC), commonly known as Vitruvius, was a Roman author, architect, and civil engineer during the 1st century BC, known for his multi-volume work entitled De Architectura. By his own description[1] Vitruvius served as an artilleryman, the third class of arms in the military offices. He probably served as a senior officer of artillery in charge of doctores ballistarum (artillery experts) and libratores who actually operated the machines.[2] BitTorrent Programmer Bram Cohen, a former University at Buffalo graduate student in Computer Science,[4] designed the protocol in April 2001 and released the first available version on July 2, 2001,[5] and the final version in 2008.[6] BitTorrent clients are available for a variety of computing platforms and operating systems including an official client released by Bittorrent, Inc. As of 2009, BitTorrent reportedly had about the same number of active users online as viewers of YouTube and Facebook combined.[7][8] As of January 2012[update], BitTorrent is utilized by 150 million active users (according to BitTorrent, Inc.). Based on this figure, the total number of monthly BitTorrent users can be estimated at more than a quarter of a billion.[9] Description[edit] The middle computer is acting as a seed to provide a file to the other computers which act as peers.

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