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Top 5 inaugural addresses. Barack Obama is sworn in as the first African-American president of the United States on January 20, 2009.

Top 5 inaugural addresses

George W. Bush stands next to his wife, Laura, and his two daughters at his second inauguration on January 20, 2005. George W. Bush is sworn in for his first term on January 20, 2001. Bill Clinton is sworn in for the second time on January 20, 1997. Bill Clinton takes his first inaugural oath on January 20, 1993. Chief Justice William Rehnquist administers the oath of office to President George H. Ronald Reagan is sworn in on January 21, 1985, at the U.S.

Ronald Reagan is sworn in as 40th president of the United States on January 20, 1981. ‘I Have a Dream’ holds 5 lessons for speechwriters. Rev.

‘I Have a Dream’ holds 5 lessons for speechwriters

King’s stirring address resonates in oratorical circles as well as historical ones “I Have a Dream” by Martin Luther King Jr. is one of the most memorable speeches of all time. Much of the greatness of this speech is tied to its historical context, a topic which goes beyond the scope of this article. Instead, I’ll focus on five key lessons in speechwriting that we can extract from Martin Luther King’s most famous speech. Emphasize phrases by repeating at the beginning of sentences Repeat key “theme” words throughout your speech Utilize appropriate quotations or allusions Use specific examples to “ground” your arguments Use metaphors to highlight contrasting concepts Lesson 1: Emphasize phrases through repetition at the start of a sentence Anaphora (repeating words at the beginning of neighboring clauses) is a commonly used rhetorical device. Authentic Presentations Take Practice - Nancy Duarte.

By Nancy Duarte | 12:00 PM November 28, 2012 Lots of us fall into the “smart” trap when presenting: we work so hard to be polished and articulate that we overcompensate and come across as flat, boring, and egg-headed.

Authentic Presentations Take Practice - Nancy Duarte

We’ve all certainly heard (and suffered through) talks like this. So how is it that great communicators manage to engage and entertain their audiences while sounding smart? They’re open and sincere. We all have different personalities, of course. And then, at the other end of the spectrum, there’s Susan Cain, whose style was very subdued when she gave one of the most buzzed-about talks at TED 2012, “The Power of Introverts.” She spoke quietly and convincingly. The funny thing is, it takes practice to be as natural as Steve Ballmer and Susan Cain in front of a group. Disarm Your Audience When You Present - Nancy Duarte. By Nancy Duarte | 8:00 AM November 12, 2012 When you walk into a room as a presenter, it’s easy to feel as if you’re the central figure: You’re up front, and people came to hear you.

Disarm Your Audience When You Present - Nancy Duarte

In reality, though, you’re not the star of the show. The audience is. Structure Your Presentation Like a Story - Nancy Duarte. By Nancy Duarte | 8:00 AM October 31, 2012 After studying hundreds of speeches, I’ve found that the most effective presenters use the same techniques as great storytellers: By reminding people of the status quo and then revealing the path to a better way, they set up a conflict that needs to be resolved.

Structure Your Presentation Like a Story - Nancy Duarte

That tension helps them persuade the audience to adopt a new mindset or behave differently — to move from what is to what could be. Do Your Slides Pass the Glance Test? - Nancy Duarte. By Nancy Duarte | 11:00 AM October 22, 2012 An audience can’t listen to your presentation and read detailed, text-heavy slides at the same time (not without missing key parts of your message, anyway).

Do Your Slides Pass the Glance Test? - Nancy Duarte

So make sure your slides pass what I call the glance test: People should be able to comprehend each one in about three seconds. Think of your slides as billboards. When people drive, they only briefly take their eyes off their main focus — the road — to process billboard information. Five Presentation Mistakes Everyone Makes - Nancy Duarte. By Nancy Duarte | 2:00 PM December 12, 2012 We all know what it’s like to sit through a bad presentation.

Five Presentation Mistakes Everyone Makes - Nancy Duarte

We can easily spot the flaws — too long, too boring, indecipherable, what have you — when we watch others speak. The thing is, when we take the stage ourselves, many of us fall into the same traps. A 5-step cure for boring body language. Create a Presentation Your Audience Will Care About - Nancy Duarte. By Nancy Duarte | 9:00 AM October 10, 2012 Generating ideas is the easiest part of creating a presentation.

Create a Presentation Your Audience Will Care About - Nancy Duarte

The hard part is deciding what to keep. Many of your ideas may be fascinating or clever, but you can’t squeeze them all in — and no one wants to hear them all, anyway. The people in the audience are the stars of your show. 7 deadly presentation mistakes to avoid. 1.

7 deadly presentation mistakes to avoid

The “I want to tell you everything” presentation This presenter is in love with their topic and wants to share it all with you – every nuance, every subtlety, every story. Their passion and enthusiasm is great, but it’s not tempered with any discipline. That results in information overload for the audience. If you’re guilty of this type of presentation, check out this post: How to Avoid Information Overload in Your Presentation. 2.

The “grab bag” presentation occurs when the presenter has a miscellany of points that are only loosely related to one another and appear in no structured order. The solution is to plan your presentation around a key message.