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Mark Mcilyar's Fitness After 50. You’re Experiencing Future Shock — It’s Why You Can’t Think Straight. I used to look forward to the future.

You’re Experiencing Future Shock — It’s Why You Can’t Think Straight

Now it paralyzes me. To deal with this, I slip on an Oculus headset my husband got last Christmas and sit there in the home screen environment, a warm cabin in the mountains under the northern lights. I don’t play any games. Instead I pretend this is where I live, away from everything, in nature. I wonder when I’ll be able to get to the real mountains again. After a while, my brain tells me screw the real mountains. This is future shock, a term coined by Alvin Toffler all the way back in 1970, in a book by the same name. I find it highly appropriate. If we’re honest, the future is looking darker these days — but there’s a lot of artificial light to distract us from that. On the one hand, climate change might destroy the planet.

We’re constantly torn about the future. Things are getting a lot worse and a lot better at the same time. We feel chronically unprepared. People are already losing jobs and healthcare to pieces of software.

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Health. Clear Thinking. Your brain on cortisol: Why overstressed gray matter is leading us astray in lockdown. When it comes to vices during the pandemic, simply put, it's been difficult to say "no.

Your brain on cortisol: Why overstressed gray matter is leading us astray in lockdown

" Drinking an extra glass of wine here, eating half a birthday cake in one sitting there — whatever it takes to escape the constant strain of life under lockdown. That seemed reasonable in March, anyway. But nine months on, when experience has demonstrated that chain-smoking a pack of cigarettes doesn't compensate for human interaction, why do bad habits continue to compel us? The prolonged traumatic, or "chronic toxic," stress that most people have been experiencing throughout the pandemic makes it more difficult to keep desires in check, and it in turn promotes illogical pleasure-seeking, said Dr. Robert Lustig, a professor emeritus of pediatric endocrinology at the University of California, San Francisco, and author of "Metabolical. " "Dopamine is the reward neurotransmitter.

Take the beloved carbohydrate sugar. But what exactly about baking makes it so suited for quarantine? We learned how to live a good life over 2000 years ago. Two millennia ago, writers warned against the monstrous ideas of a Greek mastermind.

We learned how to live a good life over 2000 years ago

For hundreds of years, this man was denounced as selfish, immoral and godless and his followers were condemned as gluttonous, sex-mad hedonists. 500 years after this villain’s death an esteemed writer was delighted to declare that his evil ideas were now so dead that “not a single spark can be lit from them.”

But apparently a few embers remained, because another 700 years later he was said to deserve to be in hell locked in a coffin that was set on fire. This was in one of the finest pieces of literature ever written, Dante’s Divine Comedy. Such was the furious reaction to the work of the philosopher Epicurus. Epicurus said we can save ourselves a lot of anxiety by reining in our urges and directing our desires towards things which are really necessary like simple food and shelter.

The Uncertain Times Tools. 2020 has been a year of unparalleled… In our work, Cassie and I have both been tackling big societal problems for decades and part of that has involved learning and practicing how to navigate, and to *be* in complexity.

The Uncertain Times Tools. 2020 has been a year of unparalleled…

For years, academics and practitioners have been thinking about how to navigate complexity, developing useful concepts, insight and practices. The bad news is that often this is pretty inaccessible, only discoverable in ivory towers, or niche leadership communities. We wanted to take the ideas we’ve found helpful and make them more available, because right now we’re all navigating complexity daily. On some level we wanted to emulate the reactions we’d had a decade ago when we both read a book called Dancing at the Edge by Graham Leicester & Maureen O’Hara about the competencies needed to navigate the 21st century.

It was like someone had seen and validated all the ‘weird’, countercultural things we did. We wanted the tools to help people on three levels: (i) emotional (ii) process and (iii) planning. Reading list: 9 books to help you rewrite your own story. Stocksy As a psychotherapist and writer, I see firsthand the power of stories — not only how faulty narratives can hold us back but also how simple edits can transform our lives.

Reading list: 9 books to help you rewrite your own story

In my book Maybe You Should Talk To Someone, I bring people into the therapy room (two of them, actually: mine, where I’m the clinician; and my therapist’s, where I’m the patient) to show how the process of revising our stories works and how readers can apply it themselves. The thing about stories is that no matter how meticulously we plan our lives, there are always plot twists and it’s often in uncertainty where the seeds of growth are planted. We are living in especially uncertain times now, so I’ve compiled this reading list.