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You experience a long domain logon time in Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2008 R2 after you deploy Group Policy preferences to the computer. Ce correctif résout les problèmes suivants.

You experience a long domain logon time in Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2008 R2 after you deploy Group Policy preferences to the computer

Problème 1 Supposons que vous disposez d'un ordinateur client dans un environnement de domaine. L'ordinateur exécute l'un des systèmes d'exploitation suivants :Windows VistaWindows Server 2008Windows 7Windows Server 2008 R2 Vous déployez des préférences de stratégie de groupe (GPP) sur l'ordinateur client en utilisant le ciblage au niveau de l'élément à l'aide de groupes de sécurité. Dans ce cas, un utilisateur de l'ordinateur client est confronté à une heure d'ouverture de session de domaine long. Ce problème devient plus évident si le contrôleur de domaine est uniquement accessible via une liaison lente. Remarque : Si vous utilisez des outils d'analyse réseau pour résoudre ce problème, vous pouvez voir de nombreuses requêtes de Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) que vous voulez vérifier le type d'objet de membres du groupe dans le domaine. Problème 2 La commande netstat - ano renvoie une sortie semblable au suivant :

Root Causes for Slow Boots and Logons (sbsl) - TechNet Articles - United States (English) This article describes Microsoft Support experiences in troubleshooting boot and logon delays, specifically the root causes.

Root Causes for Slow Boots and Logons (sbsl) - TechNet Articles - United States (English)

Other related topics include: The goal of this content is to create awareness among IT administrators, support professionals, and consultants, about the tools, causes, and resolutions for boot and user logon delays. The primary focus is on domain-joined clients and servers. The article does not pertain to slow boots and logons on consumer desktops in a workgroup, but some of the tools and methods would still apply, such as enabling verbose logging and noting the message and duration where the boot or logon hung. Written by: A. Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows 7, or Windows Server 2008 R2 may stop responding at the Welcome screen after you enter the user credentials to log on to the computer. Slow logon with event ID 6005 and 6006. I have a domain joined system (2008 R2), in a site that uses RODCs, that takes a very long time to log into.

Slow logon with event ID 6005 and 6006

In the application event viewer I get warnings 6005 and 6006. I have gone through many, many threads about this, as it seems to be a common problem. I do not think it is a GP issue, as there are other servers in the same OU and same site, that are working fine. I can log onto the machine using a local account without any problems, but if I try and use any domain account (I've tried several) it will take between 5-10 minutes for the logon to happen and will generate the 6005/6006 events. When I eventually get logged onto the server using a domain account, I am unable to run gpresult, as it comes back with "The user does not have RSOP data". The server can ping the RODC in its site. I have no idea why this is happening. /var/log/metasplo.it: Windows 7 WMI validation hotfix improves slow network logins. Like many other system administrators of Windows 7 systems, I have been experiencing some very slow logins on domain joined Windows 7 systems.

/var/log/metasplo.it: Windows 7 WMI validation hotfix improves slow network logins

Some of the common factors of these slow network logins include: Computers that multiple users log into, for example Education computers where 100s of users log inComputers with a large number of group policiesFirst time logons Windows 7 machinesMachines hanging on "Applying user settings" or more commonly "Preparing your desktop"The problem normally develops over time and as more and more users have logged in at least once, the login process slows even more. Some users on Microsoft forums are reporting login times as long as 30 minutes, but in my case the maximum times are 2-3 minutes.

Fortunately for users that have previously logged in, login times are significantly quicker, but in Education using the same computer twice can be a rare occurrence. Enabling the Group Policy debug logging 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Attempting to interpret the logs. Fixing Group Policy problems by using log files: Group Policy. This topic provides information related to troubleshooting Group Policy problems by using log files.

Fixing Group Policy problems by using log files: Group Policy

Troubleshooting Group Policy by Using Log Files If other tools do not provide the information you need to identify the problems affecting Group Policy application, you can enable verbose logging and examine the resulting log files. Verbose logging can reduce performance and consume significant disk space, so as a best practice enable verbose logging only when necessary. For example, enabling Userenv.dll logging allows administrators to view information about what occurs in the background when a user logs on to the computer. Userenv.dll is part of the code of the Group Policy engine and is always called whenever policy settings are processed.

Client Log Files Log files can be generated by the core client engine (Userenv) and by every CSE except the Scripts CSE. The following table lists several log files you can generate at the client that relate to Group Policy troubleshooting. Tools for Troubleshooting Slow Boots and Slow Logons (sbsl) - TechNet Articles - United States (English)

This article describes Microsoft Support experiences in troubleshooting boot and logon delays.

Tools for Troubleshooting Slow Boots and Slow Logons (sbsl) - TechNet Articles - United States (English)

Other related topics include: Troubleshooting Slow Operating System Boot Times and Slow User Logons (sbsl)Root Causes for Slow Boots and Logons (sbsl)The Windows 7 Boot Process (sbsl) The goal of this content is to create awareness among IT administrators, support professionals, and consultants, about the tools, cause, and resolutions for boot and user logon delays. Written by: A. Conner, David Everett, and Joey Seifert. Troubleshooting the intermittent slow logon or slow startup - AD Troubleshooting. Update: See also the following articles for up-to-date information on how to fix slow logon issues in Windows systems: Sometimes the following issue turns up as a support case with Microsoft Support: Every now and then, we have a slow logon to several of our workstations.

Troubleshooting the intermittent slow logon or slow startup - AD Troubleshooting

We can't see a pattern in which users or computers are involved and we can't reproduce the issue consistently. Most of the time everything works fine and the users log on without problems. When the issue *does* occur; the machine typically hangs for a long time during the ‘Applying Computer Group Policy’ or ‘Applying User Group Policy’ or ’Running Startup Scripts’ stages. This is usually a difficult and time-consuming problem to troubleshoot.

Windows XP and Windows Vista have a feature called Fast Logon Optimization, which means that the user is allowed to enter their credentials before the machine itself is fully ready to service logons. Once you have a reproducable scenario, you can follow up with things like: Intermittent Slow Domain Login - Hangs at Welcome Screen. On about 3/12/12, our users started experiencing slow logon times (hanging at the welocome screen) for upwards of 10 to 15 minutes.

Intermittent Slow Domain Login - Hangs at Welcome Screen

It does not happen when coming out of sleep or a locked state (only when restarting or booting up). It does not happen every time. This is happening across mulitple office locations and multiple hardware models (laptops and desktop), Win7 64bit and 32bit, SP1 installed on all. There is nothing of significance in event logs that I can find.

We have logon scripts mapping drives but not printers, however nothing has changed with those recently.