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Qigong

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Qigong, chi kung, or chi gung (simplified Chinese: 气功; traditional Chinese: 氣功; pinyin: qìgōng; Wade–Giles: chi4 gong1; literally "Life Energy Cultivation") is a practice of aligning breath, movement, and awareness for exercise, healing, and meditation.

With roots in Chinese medicine, martial arts, and philosophy, qigong is traditionally viewed as a practice to cultivate and balance qi (chi) or what has been translated as "intrinsic life energy".

It is generally accepted that Qigong exercises have three components: a posture (whether moving or stationary) 調身, breathing techniques 調息, and mental focus on guiding qi through the body 調心. The prerequisite is a calm, relaxed state of mind.

Qigong is now practiced throughout China and worldwide, and is considered by some to be exercise, and by others to be a type of alternative medicine or meditative practice. From a philosophical perspective qigong is believed to help develop human potential, allow access to higher realms of awareness, and awaken one's "true nature".

Possible health benefits of qigong have been studied in various medical conditions. Evidence of effectiveness is inconclusive due to the poor quality of the clinical trials.

Medical Qigong Therapy: Qi Emission Therapy for the treatment of Uterine Cysts and Tumors. Medical Qigong Therapy: Qi Emission Therapy for the treatment of Uterine Cysts and Tumors The Uterus: Bao Figure 1.

Medical Qigong Therapy: Qi Emission Therapy for the treatment of Uterine Cysts and Tumors

The Chinese Ideograph for Uterus (Bao) Several classical dictionaries translate “Bao” as the uterus, but the word Bao in Chinese Medicine refers to both the physical and energetic structure within which the embryo develops. The ideograph depicting the Chinese characters for the uterus “Bao” is described as follows (Figure 1): Qigong. Qigong, qi gong, chi kung, or chi gung (simplified Chinese: 气功; traditional Chinese: 氣功; pinyin: qìgōng; Wade–Giles: chi gong; literally: "Life Energy Cultivation") is type of spiritual practice intended to "align" body, breath, and mind for health, meditation, and martial arts training.

Qigong

With roots in Chinese medicine, philosophy, and martial arts, qigong is traditionally viewed as a practice to cultivate and balance qi (chi) or what has been translated as "life energy".[1] Etymology.

History

Practices, forms, and techniques. Traditional and classic theory. Contemporary views. Health benefits. Research. Meditation and self-cultivation applications. Martial arts applications. Auras. Mudras. Qi (Chi) Chakras. Acupuncture/Acupressure. The body in traditional Chinese medicine. The model of the body in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has the following elements: Every diagnosis is a "Pattern of disharmony" that affects one or more organs, such as "Spleen Qi Deficiency" or "Liver Fire Blazing" or "Invasion of the Stomach by Cold", and every treatment is centered on correcting the disharmony.

The body in traditional Chinese medicine

Your Mind & Body Are Not Separate. This Chart Explains It All. This Is What The Sacred Chant “Om” Looks Like Geometrically. What does the word “love” look like?

This Is What The Sacred Chant “Om” Looks Like Geometrically

What does the sound of birds chirping look like? How about the sound of running water? Believe it or not, but every single sound has an actual physical structure to it that can be made visible very easily. The ancients knew this, which is why the revered chanting and mantras so highly. We will look at that last point more deeply in a little bit. The science of visible sound Cymatics is the scientific study of visible sound waves. What’s fascinating is that when you play recordings of ancient sacred chants and matras into the plate, the particles of sand arrange themselves into beautiful mandalas and sacred geometric structures.

Why is this so amazing? Ok, so it turned out to be a bunch of ovals for a bit, and some pretty sacred geometric patterns. Elliptical paths are the routes planets take as they orbit our sun. How did the ancients know about this? In fact, Om is what Harvard trained brain neurosurgeon of 25 years Dr. Thanks for reading! Team Spirit. Baduanjin qigong. The Baduanjin qigong(八段錦) is one of the most common forms of Chinese qigong used as exercise.[1] Variously translated as Eight Pieces of Brocade, Eight-Section Brocade, Eight Silken Movements and others, the name of the form generally refers to how the eight individual movements of the form characterize and impart a silken quality (like that of a piece of brocade) to the body and its energy.

Baduanjin qigong

The Baduanjin is primarily designated as a form of medical qigong, meant to improve health.[2] This is in contrast to religious or martial forms of qigong. However, this categorization does not preclude the form's use by martial artists as a supplementary exercise, and this practice is frequent.[2] History[edit] This exercise is mentioned in several encyclopedias originating from the Song Dynasty. The Pivot of the Way (Dao Shi, c. 1150) describes an archaic form of this qigong.[3] The Ten Compilations on Cultivating Perfection (Xiuzhen shi-shu, c. 1300) features illustrations of all eight movements.