background preloader

History of Ireland (1801–1923)

Facebook Twitter

The whole island of Ireland formed a constituent part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 1801 to 1922. For almost all of this period, Ireland was governed by the Parliament of the United Kingdom in London through its Dublin Castle administration in Ireland.

Ireland faced considerable economic difficulties in the 19th century, including the Great Famine of the 1840s. The late 19th and early 20th centuries saw a vigorous campaign for Irish Home Rule. While legislation enabling Irish Home Rule was eventually passed, vigorous and armed opposition from Irish unionists, particularly in Ulster, opposed it. Proclamation was shelved for the duration following the outbreak of the Great War. By 1918, however, moderate nationalism had been eclipsed by militant republican separatism. Ulster Unionism was adamantly opposed to its implementation. History of Ireland (1801–1923) The whole island of Ireland formed a constituent part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 1801 to 1922.

History of Ireland (1801–1923)

For almost all of this period, Ireland was governed by the Parliament of the United Kingdom in London through its Dublin Castle administration in Ireland. Ireland faced considerable economic difficulties in the 19th century, including the Great Famine of the 1840s. The late 19th and early 20th centuries saw a vigorous campaign for Irish Home Rule. While legislation enabling Irish Home Rule was eventually passed, vigorous and armed opposition from Irish unionists, particularly in Ulster, opposed it.

Act of Union and Catholic emancipation

Great Famine (Ireland) In Ireland, the Great Famine (Irish: an Gorta Mór) was a period of mass starvation, disease and emigration between 1845 and 1852. It is sometimes referred to, mostly outside Ireland, as the Irish Potato Famine because one-third of the population was then solely reliant on this cheap crop for a number of historical reasons. During the famine approximately 1 million people died and a million more emigrated from Ireland, causing the island's population to fall by between 20% and 25%.

The proximate cause of famine was a potato disease commonly known as potato blight. The Great famine. Young Irelander rebellion. Young Irelander Rebellion of 1848. The Young Irelander Rebellion was a failed Irish nationalist uprising led by the Young Ireland movement, part of the wider Revolutions of 1848 that affected most of Europe.

Young Irelander Rebellion of 1848

It took place on 29 July 1848 in the village of Ballingarry, South Tipperary. After being chased by a force of Young Irelanders and their supporters, an Irish Constabulary unit raided a house and took those inside as hostages. A several-hour gunfight followed, but the rebels fled after a large group of police reinforcements arrived. Origins[edit] As with the earlier United Irishmen, who had been inspired by the ideals of the French Revolution, the Young Irelanders were inspired by struggles for freedom on the continent. 1848 was a year of revolutions throughout continental Europe.

Land agitation and agrarian resurgence

Conradh na Gaeilge. Conradh na Gaeilge's logo Conradh na Gaeilge, Dublin.

Conradh na Gaeilge

Conradh na Gaeilge (Irish pronunciation: [ˈkɔn̪ˠɾˠə nə ˈɡeːlʲɟə]; historically also known by its English name, the Gaelic League) is a non-governmental organisation that promotes the Irish language in Ireland and elsewhere. Origins[edit] Advertisement for the Gaelic League in the Gaelic Journal, June 1894. The English text reads "This Association has been founded solely to keep the Irish Language spoken in Ireland. In contrast with nationalist political organisations and literary associations the League accepted women on an equal basis from the start. Though apolitical, the organisation attracted many Irish nationalists of different persuasions, much like the Gaelic Athletic Association.

From 1922[edit] After the foundation of the Irish Free State in 1922, the organisation had a less prominent role in public life as Irish was made a compulsory subject in state-funded schools. See also[edit] Foras na Gaeilge. Culture and the Gaelic revival. Labor conflicts. Ireland and World War I. Irish World War I propaganda recruitment poster, c. 1915, by Hely's Limited, Dublin.

Ireland and World War I

Irish Civil War. The Irish Civil War (Irish: Cogadh Cathartha na hÉireann; 28 June 1922 – 24 May 1923) followed the Irish War of Independence and accompanied the establishment of the Irish Free State, an entity independent from the United Kingdom but within the British Empire.

Irish Civil War

The conflict was waged between two opposing groups of Irish republicans over the Anglo-Irish Treaty. Civil war.

Home Rule, Easter Rising and War of Independence (1912–1922)