background preloader

Guns and the NRA

Facebook Twitter

The Myth Behind Defensive Gun Ownership. In the early hours of Nov. 2, 2013, in Dearborn Heights, Michigan, a pounding at the door startled Theodore Wafer from his slumber.

The Myth Behind Defensive Gun Ownership

Unable to find his cell phone to call the police, he grabbed the shotgun he kept loaded in his closet. Wafer opened the door and, spotting a dark figure behind the screen, fired a single blast at the supposed intruder. The shot killed a 19-year-old girl who was knocking to ask for help after a car accident. Shortly after midnight on June 5, 2014, two friends left a party briefly. Upon returning they accidently knocked on the wrong door. Story Continued Below On Sept. 21, 2014, Eusebio Christian was awakened by a noise. What do these and so many other cases have in common? In 1992, Gary Kleck and Marc Getz, criminologists at Florida State University, conducted a random digit-dial survey to establish the annual number of defensive gun uses in the United States. It may sound reassuring, but is utterly false. First, there is the social desirability bias.

Gun-Rights Advocates Claim Criminals Don't Follow Gun Laws. Here's the Research That Shows They're Wrong. - The Trace. Despite the fact that mass shootings are predominantly an American phenomenon, gun advocates are quick to insist that there is nothing we can do to prevent them.

Gun-Rights Advocates Claim Criminals Don't Follow Gun Laws. Here's the Research That Shows They're Wrong. - The Trace

Instead, they suggest these murders could only be reduced by having more armed civilians — aka “good guys with guns” — roaming the streets, a solution that inevitably involves fewer gun regulations and more gun ownership. Reducing gun violence through straightforward policies of the sort implemented in virtually every other industrialized nation is regarded as a chimera by the National Rifle Association. After all, criminals don’t follow laws, so what would be the point? John R. Do Armed Civilians Stop Mass Shooters? Actually, No. In the wake of the unthinkable massacre in Newtown, Connecticut, pro-gun ideologues are once again calling for ordinary citizens to arm themselves as a solution to mass shootings.

Do Armed Civilians Stop Mass Shooters? Actually, No.

If only the principal at Sandy Hook Elementary School had possessed a M-4 assault rifle she could've stopped the killer, they say. This latest twist on a long-running argument isn't just absurd on its face; there is no evidence to support it. As I reported recently in our in-depth investigation, not one of 62 mass shootings in the United States over the last 30 years has been stopped this way. More broadly, attempts by armed civilians to intervene in shooting rampages are rare—and are successful even more rarely. (Two people who tried it in recent years were gravely wounded or killed.) Those pesky facts haven't stopped the "arm America more!

" And what about cases in which citizens try to use their guns and things go terribly wrong? Ten Arguments Gun Advocates Make, and Why They're Wrong. There has been yet another mass shooting, something that now seems to occur on a monthly basis. Every time another tragedy like this occurs, gun advocates make the same arguments about why we can't possibly do anything to restrict the weaponization of our culture. Here's a guide to what they'll be saying in the coming days: 1.

Now isn't the time to talk about guns. We're going to hear this over and over, and not just from gun advocates; Jay Carney said it to White House reporters today. 2. Maybe, but people with guns kill many, many more people than they would if they didn't have guns, and guns designed to kill as many people as possible. 3. If that were true, then how come it never happens? 4. Five Lies The Gun Lobby Tells You. America seems to be in for another debate over gun regulation after the slaughter at Sandy Hook Elementary School left 27 (mostly children) dead.

So it’s worth reviewing five made against regulating gun ownership in the United States: MYTH #1: More guns don’t lead to more murders. A survey by researchers at the Harvard University School of Public Health found strong statistical support for the idea that, even if you control for poverty levels, more people die from gun homicides in areas with higher rates of gun ownership .

And despite what gun advocates say, countries like Israel and Switzerland don’t disprove the point . The NRA Myth of Arming the Good Guys. The gut-wrenching shock of the attack at Sandy Hook Elementary School on December 14 wasn't just due to the 20 unthinkably young victims.

The NRA Myth of Arming the Good Guys

It was also due to the realization that this specific, painfully familiar nightmare was unfolding yet again. As the scope of the massacre in Newtown became clear, some news accounts suggested that mass shootings in the United States have not increased, based on a broad definition of them. But in fact 2012 has been unprecedented for a particular kind of horror that's been on the rise in recent years, from Virginia Tech to Tucson to Aurora to Oak Creek to Newtown.

There have been at least 62 such mass shootings in the last three decades, attacks in which the killer took the lives of four or more people (the FBI's baseline for mass murder) in a public place—a school, a workplace, a mall, a religious building. Seven of them occurred in 2012 alone. Attempts by armed citizens to stop shooters are rare. Sen. Guns for Felons How the NRA Works to Rearm Criminals. The National Rifle Association (NRA) claims that it supports vigorous enforcement of our nation's gun laws and efforts to keep guns out of the hands of criminals.

Guns for Felons How the NRA Works to Rearm Criminals

Yet the NRA has actually worked to put guns back into criminals' hands. Following is the saga of the federal "relief from disability" program. The NRA has worked to expand and protect this guns-for-felons program that has rearmed thousands of convicted—and often violent—felons. Under federal law, those convicted of a felony are forbidden from purchasing or possessing firearms and explosives. Yet as the result of a 1965 amendment to the Federal Firearms Act of 1938, convicted felons were allowed to apply to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) for "relief" from the "disability" of not being able to buy and possess guns.

Although created to benefit one corporation, the program quickly became a mechanism by which thousands of individuals with felony convictions had their gun privileges restored.