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Chemistry

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Chemistry is a branch of physical science that studies the composition, structure, properties and change of matter.

Chemistry deals with such topics as the properties of individual atoms, how atoms form chemical bonds to create chemical compounds, the interactions of substances through intermolecular forces that give matter its general properties, and the interactions between substances through chemical reactions to form different substances.

Chemistry is sometimes called the central science because it bridges other natural sciences, including physics, geology and biology. For the differences between chemistry and physics see Comparison of chemistry and physics.

Scholars disagree about the etymology of the word chemistry. The history of chemistry can be traced to alchemy, which had been practiced for several millennia in various parts of the world.

Chemistry. Chemistry is a branch of physical science that studies the composition, structure, properties and change of matter.[1][2] Chemistry is chiefly concerned with atoms and molecules and their interactions and transformations, for example, the properties of the chemical bonds formed between atoms to create chemical compounds. As such, chemistry studies the involvement of electrons and various forms of energy in photochemical reactions, oxidation-reduction reactions, changes in phases of matter, and separation of mixtures. Preparation and properties of complex substances, such as alloys, polymers, biological molecules, and pharmaceutical agents are considered in specialized fields of chemistry. Chemistry is sometimes called the central science because it bridges other natural sciences like physics, geology and biology.[3][4] Chemistry is a branch of physical science but distinct from physics.[5] Etymology The word alchemy in turn is derived from the Arabic word al-kīmīā (الکیمیاء).

Definition.

Etymology and definition

History of Chemistry. Principles of modern chemistry. Periodic table. Chemistry: education sources. Scientists Found An Enormous Reserve Of Helium, And It's A 'Game-Changing' Discovery. Just In Time Apart from making balloons float and making you sound like a chipmunk, helium is essential to the superconductor industry, and is a crucial ingredient in MRI scans as well as other medical applications. Numerous other applications also require helium, such as quantum mechanics and space technology.

In recent years, experts have been worried about helium reserves being depleted. Ironically, it is the second most abundant element in space. Since helium is a lot lighter than air, a lot of the Earth’s helium supply quickly seeps out into space. While this means we can never really run out of helium in the universe, harvesting it would become increasingly costly. The world relies on the US for 75% of its helium supply, and based on estimates, the American reserve can only produce enough to last until 2018, 2020 at best. But fear not: a large helium reserve has just been found in Tanzania. Finding the Sweet Spot.

Nuclear chemistry

Chemistry Tools.