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Applied psychology

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Applied behavior analysis. Applied behavior analysis (ABA), previously known as behavior modification,[1] is the application of operant and classical conditioning that modifies human behaviors, especially as part of a learning or treatment process.

Applied behavior analysis

Behavior analysts focus on the observable relationship of behavior to the environment, including antecedents and consequences, without resort to "hypothetical constructs".[2] By functionally assessing the relationship between a targeted behavior and the environment, the methods of ABA can be used to change that behavior. Methods in applied behavior analysis range from validated intensive behavioral interventions—most notably utilized for children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD)[3]—to basic research which investigates the rules by which humans adapt and maintain behavior.

Definition[edit] History[edit] B.F. Although deriving from a similar philosophy, behavior modification was one form of behaviorism that modified behavior without addressing what was causing it. Clinical psychology. Clinical psychology is an integration of science, theory and clinical knowledge for the purpose of understanding, preventing, and relieving psychologically-based distress or dysfunction and to promote subjective well-being and personal development.[1][2] Central to its practice are psychological assessment and psychotherapy, although clinical psychologists also engage in research, teaching, consultation, forensic testimony, and program development and administration.[3] In many countries, clinical psychology is regulated as a health care profession.

Clinical psychology

The field is often considered to have begun in 1896 with the opening of the first psychological clinic at the University of Pennsylvania by Lightner Witmer. In the first half of the 20th century, clinical psychology was focused on psychological assessment, with little attention given to treatment. This changed after the 1940s when World War II resulted in the need for a large increase in the number of trained clinicians. Community psychology. Community psychology studies the individuals' contexts within communities and the wider society,[1] and the relationships of the individual to communities and society.

Community psychology

Community psychologists seek to understand the quality of life of individuals, communities, and society. Their aim is to enhance quality of life through collaborative research and action.[2] Consumer behaviour. Consumer Behaviour is the study of individuals, groups, or organizations and the processes they use to select, secure, and dispose of products, services, experiences, or ideas to satisfy needs and the impacts that these processes have on the consumer and society.[1] It blends elements from psychology, sociology, social anthropology, marketing and economics.

Consumer behaviour

It attempts to understand the decision-making processes of buyers, both individually and in groups such as how emotions affect buying behaviour. It studies characteristics of individual consumers such as demographics and behavioural variables in an attempt to understand people's wants. It also tries to assess influences on the consumer from groups such as family, friends, reference groups, and society in general.

Customer behaviour study is based on consumer buying behaviour, with the customer playing the three distinct roles of user, payer and buyer. Black box model[edit] Information search[edit] Counseling psychology. Counseling psychology is a psychological specialty that encompasses research and applied work in several broad domains: counseling process and outcome; supervision and training; career development and counseling; and prevention and health.

Counseling psychology

Some unifying themes among counseling psychologists include a focus on assets and strengths, person–environment interactions, educational and career development, brief interactions, and a focus on intact personalities.[1] In the United States, the premier scholarly journals of the profession are the Journal of Counseling Psychology[2] and The Counseling Psychologist.[3] In the U.S., counseling psychology programs are accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA), while counseling programs are accredited through the Counsel for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).

History[edit] Educational psychology. Educational psychology is the study of human learning.

Educational psychology

The study of learning processes, both cognitive and affective, allows researchers to understand individual differences in behavior, personality, intellect, and self- concept. The field of educational psychology heavily relies on testing, measurement, assessment, evaluation, and training to enhance educational activities and learning processes.[1] This can involve studying instructional processes within the classroom setting.

Educational psychology can in part be understood through its relationship with other disciplines. It is informed primarily by psychology, bearing a relationship to that discipline analogous to the relationship between medicine and biology. It is also informed by neuroscience. Environmental psychology. Environmental psychology is an interdisciplinary field focused on the interplay between humans and their surroundings. The field defines the term environment broadly, encompassing natural environments, social settings, built environments, learning environments, and informational environments.

Since its conception, the field has been committed to the development of a discipline that is both value oriented and problem oriented, prioritizing research aimed at solving complex environmental problems in the pursuit of individual well-being within a larger society.[1] When solving problems involving human-environment interactions, whether global or local, one must have a model of human nature that predicts the environmental conditions under which humans will behave. This model help can design, manage, protect and/or restore environments that enhance reasonable behavior, predict the likely outcomes when these conditions are not met, and diagnose problem situations.

History[edit] Forensic psychology. Generally, a forensic psychologist is designated as an expert in a particular area of expertise.

Forensic psychology

The number of areas of expertise in which a forensic psychologist qualifies as an expert increases with experience and reputation. Forensic neuropsychologists are generally asked to appear as expert witnesses in court to discuss cases that involve issues with the brain or brain damage. They may also deal with issues of whether a person is legally competent to stand trial. Questions asked by the court of a forensic psychologist are generally not questions regarding psychology but are legal questions and the response must be in language the court understands. For example, a forensic psychologist is frequently appointed by the court to assess a defendant's competence to stand trial. Health psychology. Health psychology is the study of psychological and behavioral processes in health, illness, and healthcare.[1] It is concerned with understanding how psychological, behavioral, and cultural factors contribute to physical health and illness.

Health psychology

Psychological factors can affect health directly. For example, chronically occurring environmental stressors affecting the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, cumulatively, can harm health. Behavioral factors can also affect a person's health. For example, certain behaviors can, over time, harm (smoking, excessive alcohol consumption) or enhance health (exercise, low fat diet).[2] Health psychologists take a biopsychosocial approach. In other words, health psychologists understand health to be the product not only of biological processes (e.g., a virus, tumor, etc.) but also of psychological (e.g., thoughts and beliefs), behavioral (e.g., habits), and social processes (e.g., socioeconomic status and ethnicity).[2]

Human factors and ergonomics. Industrial and organizational psychology. Industrial and organizational psychology (also known as I–O psychology, occupational psychology, work psychology, WO psychology, IWO psychology and business psychology) is the scientific study of human behavior in the workplace and applies psychological theories and principles to organizations.

Industrial and organizational psychology

I-O psychologists are trained in the scientist–practitioner model. Legal psychology. Legal psychology involves empirical, psychological research of the law, legal institutions, and people who come into contact with the law.

Legal psychology

Legal psychologists typically take basic social and cognitive principles and apply them to issues in the legal system such as eyewitness memory, jury decision-making, investigations, and interviewing. The term "legal psychology" has only recently come into usage, primarily as a way to differentiate the experimental focus of legal psychology from the clinically-oriented forensic psychology. Media psychology. Media psychology seeks to understand how media as a factor in the growing use of technology impacts how people perceive, interpret, respond, and interact in a media rich world. Media psychologists typically focus on identifying potential benefits and negative consequences of all forms of technology and work to promote and develop positive media use and applications.[1][2][3] The term 'media psychology' is often confusing because many people associate 'media' with mass media rather than technology.

Many even have the idea that media psychology is more about appearing in the media than anything else. The 'media' in Media Psychology means 'mediated experience' not any single kind of media or technology. Military psychology. Military psychology is the research, design and application of psychological theories and empirical data towards understanding, predicting and countering behaviours either in friendly or enemy forces or civilian population that may be undesirable, threatening or potentially dangerous to the conduct of military operations.

Military psychology transforms from sub-branch groups of different psychology disciplines into a tool used by the military, as will all tools of the military, to enable the troops to better survive the stresses of war while using psychological principles to unbalance the enemy forces for easier wins.[1] All stresses and psychological illnesses that military psychology looks at are not specific only to the military. However, the military soldiers tend to face a specific combination of these otherwise generic stresses. Military psychology then specializes in looking at this unique combination of stresses that plagues the military and war settings. Role[edit] Lewis M. Occupational health psychology. Occupational health psychology (OHP) is a psychology field that is concerned with the safety, health and well-being of workers.[1] It emerged from two distinct applied psychology disciplines, health psychology and industrial and organizational (I/O) psychology, and has been informed by other disciplines including industrial sociology, industrial engineering, economics,[2] preventive medicine, public health,[3] and occupational health.[4] OHP is concerned with psychosocial factors[5] in the work environment and the development, maintenance, and promotion of employee health and that of their families.[3] The field focuses on factors in the workplace that can lead to injury, disease, and distress.[3] Historical overview[edit] Origins[edit] The Industrial Revolution prompted thinkers to concern themselves with the nature of work.

For example, Marx's[6] theory of alienation has been influential. Emergence as a field of study[edit] Development after 1990[edit] Research methods[edit] Job loss[edit] Political psychology. Psychoneuroimmunology. Psychopharmacology. An arrangement of psychoactive drugs The field of psychopharmacology studies a wide range of substances with various types of psychoactive properties, focusing primarily on the chemical interactions with the brain. Psychoactive drugs interact with particular target sites or receptors found in the nervous system to induce widespread changes in physiological or psychological functions.

The specific interaction between drugs and their receptors is referred to as "drug action", and the widespread changes in physiological or psychological function is referred to as "drug effect". School psychology. Sport psychology. Traffic psychology. Traffic psychology is a discipline of psychology that studies the relationship between psychological processes and the behavior of road users. In general, traffic psychology aims to apply theoretical aspects of psychology in order to improve traffic mobility by helping to develop and apply accident countermeasures, as well as by guiding desired behaviors through education and the motivation of road users.[1][2] Behavior is frequently studied in conjunction with accident research in order to assess causes and differences in accident involvement.[1] Traffic psychologists distinguish three motivations of driver behavior: reasoned or planned behavior, impulsive or emotional behavior, and habitual behavior.