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CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

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Presentation "Marie Delaney Assessment with meaning : how can we develop meaningful assessments for children with Special Educational Needs. 1www.britishcouncil.ae." Site. Marie Delaney: Dealing with challenging learners. How to manage difficult behaviour in the classroom with John D’Abbro, headteacher from Jamie’s Dream School. Book now What does effective behaviour management look like in modern schools?

How to manage difficult behaviour in the classroom with John D’Abbro, headteacher from Jamie’s Dream School

What new approaches and tools can teachers, headmasters and heads of department use to get the best out of their pupils? This inspiring evening class with John D’Abbro offers a range of techniques and tools for teachers of all levels. John was headteacher of the critically acclaimed TV show Jamie’s Dream School, where he worked with Jamie Oliver to help inspire disengaged children back into education. This masterclass is a unique chance to learn from John’s extensive experience and passion for education, as well an opportunity to share best practice with other teachers.

Content You may also be interested in… Behaviour management in the classroom: A masterclass with Educating Essex’s Mr Drew More about your teacher… John D’Abbro is head of the New Rush Hall Group, an organisation that works with children with behavioural, emotional and social difficulties. Book now Details To contact us, click here.

You don't need to be lovey-dovey: John d'Abbro's behaviour management basics. John d’Abbro, the headteacher in Channel 4’s popular TV show Jamie’s Dream School and recipient of an OBE for services to special education, has no doubts about what’s important when it comes to behaviour management.

You don't need to be lovey-dovey: John d'Abbro's behaviour management basics

It is vital, he says, to develop a good relationship with students by being “fair, trustworthy and honest”. The head of New Rush Hall Group, an organisation that works with children with behavioural, emotional and social difficulties, says: “Learning is an exploratory and uncertain process so children have to trust you to learn from and with you. A big part of it is about making children feel that you care about them. “That’s not to say we should be all lovey-dovey; and it’s not about getting children to like you either, you can respect someone without liking them. We need to go into class confident, and work to gain the respect of our students, making them realise we want to be there.”

Start the lesson well I always try to greet children as they come in. Be confident. ADDicted to Distraction: How to Deal with Attention Issues in ESL. Marie Delaney - Dealing with students with challenging behaviour. Addressing Our Needs: Maslow Comes to Life for Educators and Students. In the mid-1950s, humanistic psychologist Abraham Maslow created a theory of basic, psychological and self-fulfillment needs that motivate individuals to move consciously or subconsciously through levels or tiers based on our inner and outer satisfaction of those met or unmet needs.

Addressing Our Needs: Maslow Comes to Life for Educators and Students

As a parent and educator, I find this theory eternally relevant for students and adults, especially in our classrooms. After studying it over the past couple of years, my graduate and undergraduate students have decided that every classroom should display a wall-sized diagram of the pyramid, as students and teachers alike place pins and post-its on the varying tiers based on their own feelings, behaviors and needs. What do actual brain-compatible strategies look like on this pyramid? Tier One Meeting Physiological Needs in the Classroom These elements contribute to brain-compatible learning by creating a physical environment that is inviting, warm and friendly!

Questions to Ask Myself What do I need? Tier Two. mELTing Activities, Lessons and Ideas. Daily Assessment with Tiered Exit Cards. Classroom Management TIps. Catch Them Being Good: A Technique for Handling Disruptive Behavior. Page 1 of 2 A Technique for Handling Disruptive Behavior "Johnny loves negative attention.

Catch Them Being Good: A Technique for Handling Disruptive Behavior

I know he does those things to get me upset and make the class laugh. His classmates think he's cute when he does something to distract me from the lesson and I have to call him on it. " Sound familiar? In some cases, teachers may make comments to students that are demeaning and draw attention to those students from their classmates. The scenario that follows describes the case of a hypothetical child who is disruptive because his disruptive behavior results in unusual comments from the teacher.

During seat-work assignments, William seems to be constantly involved in some kind of inappropriate and disruptive classroom behavior. Sometimes Mrs. Note that in the above scenario the teacher's attention often follows the disruptive behavior. Genki English: Making Education Fun! 子ども英語. Classroom Management.