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RailwayJS is a nice framework built on the same principle as Rails. It is built on top of express JS : it looks easy to learn and provides a lot of helpers (localization, caching…) to build a solid web application. There is a small bad point : the ORM/ODM, called JugglingBD is weird because it claims to be able to manage both relational DB and non-relational DB. The good fact is that it allows to do some validations on the model fields and have functions to set actions before and after an operation is done on models. Railways allows to do scaffolding, that means he prebuilt your resources and your routes supposing you will do CRUD operations on a given entity kind. Javascript and Node.js last trends « Le Gelblog Javascript and Node.js last trends « Le Gelblog
I have been hacking on a project in Node.js/Express.js for some time now. I am really impressed by how fast it is to code and prototype in Node, not much gets in your way. However, there is one thing I am still struggling with, the callback model of Node.js applications. It is not that it is conceptually hard to understand or use, but i feel that it keeps me from writing clean code. Callbacks are polluting your code Callbacks are polluting your code
Why You Should Pay Attention to Node.Js

Why You Should Pay Attention to Node.Js

No, not “because I said so.” The best reason to pay attention to node.js is the audience that is paying attention to it. Joe Shaw’s pointer the other day was just the latest in a string of node.js mentions. By now you’ve probably heard that the folks from Heroku recently – as in two weeks ago yesterday – announced experimental support for the project to a shortlist of their users. Less visible are projects such as the Gilt Group funded real-time web analytics project Hummingbird (that link’s courtesy of Jeff Waugh), currently a trending repo on Github, fanout.js – a node based pubsub messaging server (that one’s via Dion Almaer), or others like nodewiki, a wiki built from node and Redis. What is node.js?
Meet the Next Big Programing Star - Node.js
The secrets of Node's success The secrets of Node's success In the short time since its initial release in late 2009, Node.js has captured the interest of thousands of experienced developers, grown a package manager and a corpus of interesting modules and applications, and even spawned a number of startups. What is it about this technology that makes it interesting to developers? And why has it succeeded while other server-side JavaScript implementations linger in obscurity or fail altogether? The key factors are performance, timing, and focusing on a real problem that wasn’t easily solved with other server-side dynamic languages.
Node.js is Important. An Introduction - PavingWays Once in a while you come across a new technology and are just blown away by it. You feel that something like this should have been around much earlier and that it is (gonna be) a significant milestone, not just in your own live as a developer but in general. The last time this happened to me was when I dug a bit deeper into a project called node.js or just “node” as the binary is called. In case you have not heard about this don’t worry. However, if you are a developer, especially if you are working with JavaScript, then you should be concerned and maybe check your news sources, because it is a couple of months old already and it is drawing a lot of attention lately! If you’re not a developer this might get a bit techy from here, but maybe you get something out of it after all… Node.js is Important. An Introduction - PavingWays