Memory, Concentration, Meditation

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Do As One. Do As One invites you to use color therapy coupled with breathing to stimulate the entire spectrum of energy within your body temple.

Do As One

Choose whether you want to breathe in one, two or three breaths per color and then sit back and calmly receive a mind, body and spirit full-spectrum boost. You can also choose to breath one breathe per color continuously. The map on this page shows you where everyone you are breathing with is located around the world in real time. Home Page. This wiki is a collaborative environment for exploring ways to become a better thinker.

Home Page

Topics that can be explored here include MemoryTechniques, MentalMath, CriticalThinking, BrainStorming, ShorthandSystems, NotebookSystems, and SmartDrugs. Other relevant topics are also welcome. SiteNews Wiki Topics Mindhacker: The support page for the 2011 book by RonHaleEvans and MartyHaleEvans. MindPerformanceHacks: The support page for the 2006 book of the same name by RonHaleEvans. Easily memorize complex information - MemoryTechnique Do hard math in your head - MentalMath Improve your intelligence Think better Other pages What is a Wiki?

Memory Improvement Techniques. Use your whole mind to remember. © iStockphoto/Yakobchuk The tools in this section help you to improve your memory. They help you both to remember facts accurately and to remember the structure of information. The tools are split into two sections. Firstly you'll learn the memory techniques themselves. As with other mind tools, the more practice you give yourself with these techniques, the more effectively you will use them. Mnemonics 'Mnemonic' is another word for memory tool. The idea behind using mnemonics is to encode difficult-to-remember information in a way that is much easier to remember. Our brains evolved to code and interpret complex stimuli such as images, colors, structures, sounds, smells, tastes, touch, positions, emotions and language.

8 Things to Know About Concentrating. “Music helps me concentrate,” Mike said to me glancing briefly over his shoulder.

8 Things to Know About Concentrating

Mike was in his room writing a paper for his U.S. History class. On his desk next to his computer sat crunched Red Bulls, empty Gatorade bottles, some extra pocket change and scattered pieces of paper. In the pocket of his sweat pants rested a blaring iPod with a chord that dangled near the floor, almost touching against his Adidas sandals. On his computer sat even more stray objects than his surrounding environment. Mike made a shift about every thirty seconds between all of the above. Do you know a person like this? The Science Behind Concentration In the above account, Mike’s obviously stuck in a routine that many of us may have found ourselves in, yet in the moment we feel it’s almost an impossible routine to get out of.

When we constantly multitask to get things done, we’re not multitasking, we’re rapidly shifting our attention. Phase 1: Blood Rush Alert Phase 2: Find and Execute Phase 3: Disengagement. Hints for Remembering Better.