Cancer research

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Virus attacks childhood cancers Public release date: 29-Aug-2011 [ Print | E-mail Share ] [ Close Window ] Contact: Jim Sliwajsliwa@asmusa.org 202-942-9297American Society for Microbiology Researchers from Yale University are looking to a virus from the same family as the rabies virus to fight a form of cancer primarily found in children and young adults. They report their findings in the September 2011 issue of the Journal of Virology. Soft tissue sarcomas are cancers that develop in tissues which connect, support, or surround other structures and organs of the body. Virus attacks childhood cancers
Harmless soil-dwelling bacteria successfully kill cancer Harmless soil-dwelling bacteria successfully kill cancer Public release date: 4-Sep-2011 [ Print | E-mail Share ] [ Close Window ] Contact: Laura Udakisl.udakis@sgm.ac.uk 44-118-988-1843Society for General Microbiology
15 August 2011Last updated at 17:04 By James Gallagher Health reporter, BBC News Scientists have discovered how cancerous cells can "elbow" their way out of tumours, offering clues for new drugs to prevent cancers spreading. They say they have identified a protein called JAK which helps cancerous cells generate the force needed to move. Cancer discovery offers hope of tackling spread of disease Cancer discovery offers hope of tackling spread of disease
A microscopic image shows two T cells binding to beads, depicted in yellow,… (Dr. Carl June / Penn Medicine ) In a potential breakthrough in cancer research, scientists at the University of Pennsylvania have genetically engineered patients' T cells — a type of white blood cell — to attack cancer cells in advanced cases of a common type of leukemia. Two of the three patients who received doses of the designer T cells in a clinical trial have remained cancer-free for more than a year, the researchers said. Experts not connected with the trial said the feat was important because it suggested that T cells could be tweaked to kill a range of cancers, including ones of the blood, breast and colon. Clinical trial raises hope for cancer treatment - latimes.com Clinical trial raises hope for cancer treatment - latimes.com
Exercise is a "wonder drug" for cancer survivors and may even prevent the disease coming back, according to a new report. Macmillan Cancer Support said physical activity should be "prescribed" by doctors after "hard evidence" showed it can significantly help recovery and prevent other long-term illnesses. Rather than patients being told to "rest up" as in the past, doctors must encourage people to get moving as soon as they feel able. A review of more than 60 studies for the charity found people undergoing treatment for cancer - as well as survivors - could benefit from exercise. During treatment, being active does not worsen patients' fatigue and has positive effects on mood and wellbeing, the study said. Once treatment has finished, exercise can reduce the impact of side effects, such as swelling, anxiety, depression, fatigue, impaired mobility and changes to weight. Exercise a 'wonder drug' that can stop cancer coming back - Scotsman.com News Exercise a 'wonder drug' that can stop cancer coming back - Scotsman.com News
Biologist says cancers might actually be newly-evolved species inside your body Biologist says cancers might actually be newly-evolved species inside your body Posted by Anonymous on July 26, 2011 We think of cancer as a disease, a form of runaway cell growth within an organism. But we might not have realized what cancers really are: separate, brand new parasitic species that evolve from and prey upon their human hosts.That’s the theory put forward by UC Berkeley biologist Peter Duesberg, who argues that the very act of carcinogenesis – the formation of cancer – is itself a form of speciation, in which distinct new species evolve. …“Cancer is comparable to a bacterial level of complexity, but still autonomous, that is, it doesn’t depend on other cells for survival; it doesn’t follow orders like other cells in the body, and it can grow where, when and how it likes.
Low dose naltrexone LDN: Harnessing the body’s own chemistry to treat human ovarian cancer Researchers at The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania have discovered that a low dose of the opioid antagonist naltrexone LDN has an extraordinarily potent antitumor effect on human ovarian cancer in tissue culture and xenografts established in nude mice. When LDN is combined with chemotherapy, there is an additive inhibitory action on tumorigenesis. This discovery, reported in the July 2011 issue of Experimental Biology and Medicine, provides new insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of ovarian neoplasia, the 4th leading cause of cancer-related mortality among women in the United States.The strategy of LDN therapy in repressing cancer was first reported over 30 years ago by Drs. Low dose naltrexone LDN: Harnessing the body’s own chemistry to treat human ovarian cancer
Formaldehyde Is Added to List of Carcinogens + (Aspartame Lupus claim) The government issued warnings on Friday about two materials used daily by millions of Americans, saying that one causes cancer and the other might.Government scientists listed formaldehyde as a carcinogen, and said it is found in worrisome quantities in plywood, particle board, mortuaries and hair salons. They also said that styrene, which is used in boats, bathtubs and in disposable foam plastic cups and plates, may cause cancer but is generally found in such low levels in consumer products that risks are low.Frequent and intense exposures in manufacturing plants are far more worrisome than the intermittent contact that most consumers have, but government scientists said that consumers should still avoid contact with formaldehyde and styrene along with six other chemicals that were added Friday to the government’s official Report on Carcinogens. Formaldehyde Is Added to List of Carcinogens + (Aspartame Lupus claim)
Cancer cells accelerate aging and inflammation in the body to drive tumor growth

THC Gives Cancer Cells the Munchies Too : The Scientific Activist

THC Gives Cancer Cells the Munchies Too : The Scientific Activist Through the results of widespread experimentation of the… well… let’s say “non-scientific” variety, it’s pretty well known that marijuana has the side effect of making the user very hungry. This is one of the many physiological effects of the active ingredient THC (?9-tetrahydrocannabinol). More relevantly, however, THC and other cannabinoids are actively being investigated for various useful clinical purposes, including the treatment of cancer through the inhibition of tumor growth.
Public release date: 6-Apr-2011 [ Print | E-mail Share ] [ Close Window ] Contact: Nicole Fawcettnfawcett@umich.edu 734-764-2220University of Michigan Health System New drug shrinks cancer in animals, U-M study shows New drug shrinks cancer in animals, U-M study shows
'Good cholesterol' nanoparticles seek and destroy cancer cells Public release date: 1-Apr-2011 [ Print | E-mail Share ] [ Close Window ] Contact: Scott Mervillesmerville@mdanderson.org 713-792-0661University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center HOUSTON - High-density lipoprotein's hauls excess cholesterol to the liver for disposal, but new research suggests "good cholesterol" can also act as a special delivery vehicle of destruction for cancer.
Cancer turns out to be a p53 protein aggregation disease ​Protein aggregation, generally associated with Alzheimer’s and mad cow disease, turns out to play a significant role in cancer. In a paper published in Nature Chemical Biology, Frederic Rousseau and Joost Schymkowitz of VIB, K.U.Leuven and Vrije Universiteit Brussel describe that certain mutations of p53, an important tumor suppressor, cause the protein to misfold in a way that the proteins start to aggregate. This not only disrupts the protective function of normal p53, but of other related proteins as well.
Single-cell blood test offers hope for future cancer patients