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Chauve-souris et SRAS

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CDC EID – JUIN 2013 – Au sommaire: Novel SARS-like Betacoronaviruses in Bats, China, 2011. Li Yang1, Zhiqiang Wu1, Xianwen Ren1, Fan Yang1, Guimei He, Junpeng Zhang, Jie Dong, Lilian Sun, Yafang Zhu, Jiang Du, Shuyi Zhang, and Qi Jin ( Author affiliations: Ministry of Health Key Laboratory of Systems Biology of Pathogens, Beijing, China (L.

CDC EID – JUIN 2013 – Au sommaire: Novel SARS-like Betacoronaviruses in Bats, China, 2011

Yang, Z. Wu, X. Ren, F. Highlight and copy the desired format. Abstract To clarify the evolutionary relationships among betavoronaviruses that infect bats, we analyzed samples collected during 2010–2011 from 14 insectivorous bat species in China. The 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was caused by a novel betacoronavirus and rapidly spread globally, causing ≈8,000 cases and nearly 900 deaths (1,2). We obtained pharyngeal and anal swab specimens of 414 insectivorous bats.

We conducted complete genome comparison and phylogenetic analysis on the basis of polymerase and spike protein. The recent fatal human infection caused by HCoV-EMC has boosted interest in the discovery of novel CoVs in humans and animals. References. Zoonoses Public Health. 2016 Dec;63(8):608-615. Detection of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Related Coronavirus and Alphacoronavirus in the Bat Population of Taiwan. Trends in Microbiology, August 2015, Vol. 23, No. Bat-to-human: spike features determining ‘host jump’ of coronaviruses SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and beyond.

NATURE 12/11/15 Engineered bat virus stirs debate over risky research - Lab-made coronavirus related to SARS can infect human cells. An experiment that created a hybrid version of a bat coronavirus — one related to the virus that causes SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) — has triggered renewed debate over whether engineering lab variants of viruses with possible pandemic potential is worth the risks.

NATURE 12/11/15 Engineered bat virus stirs debate over risky research - Lab-made coronavirus related to SARS can infect human cells.

In an article published in Nature Medicine1 on 9 November, scientists investigated a virus called SHC014, which is found in horseshoe bats in China. The researchers created a chimaeric virus, made up of a surface protein of SHC014 and the backbone of a SARS virus that had been adapted to grow in mice and to mimic human disease. The chimaera infected human airway cells — proving that the surface protein of SHC014 has the necessary structure to bind to a key receptor on the cells and to infect them. It also caused disease in mice, but did not kill them. Although almost all coronaviruses isolated from bats have not been able to bind to the key human receptor, SHC014 is not the first that can do so. Useful research. CSIRO 01/03/15 Bats confirmed host of SARS virus.

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 09/11/15 New SARS-like virus can jump directly from bats to humans, no treatment available. For immediate use: New SARS-like virus can jump directly from bats to humans, no treatment available Findings provide an opportunity to develop drugs and vaccines for coronaviruses before they emerge from animals to cause a human epidemic (Chapel Hill, N.C. – Nov. 9, 2015) – Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have discovered a new bat SARS-like virus that can jump directly from its bat hosts to humans without mutation.

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 09/11/15 New SARS-like virus can jump directly from bats to humans, no treatment available

However, researchers point out that if the SARS-like virus did jump, it is still unclear whether it could spread from human to human. The discovery, reported in the Nov. 9 issue of Nature Medicine, is notable not only because there is no treatment for this newly discovered virus, but also because it highlights an ongoing debate over the government’s decision to suspend all gain of function experiments on a variety of select agents earlier this year. –Carolina — About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. PNAS 03/07/07 A previously unknown reovirus of bat origin is associated with an acute respiratory disease in humans.

Author Affiliations Edited by Robert A.

PNAS 03/07/07 A previously unknown reovirus of bat origin is associated with an acute respiratory disease in humans

Lamb, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, and approved May 14, 2007 (received for review February 13, 2007) Abstract Respiratory infections constitute the most widespread human infectious disease, and a substantial proportion of them are caused by unknown etiological agents. Reoviruses (respiratory enteric orphan viruses) were first isolated from humans in the early 1950s and so named because they were not associated with any known disease. Respiratory tract illness (RTI) accounts for a large portion of public health spending worldwide.

Reoviruses (respiratory enteric orphan viruses) are a large and diverse group of nonenveloped viruses with segmented dsRNA genomes that are taxonomically classified into 10 genera in the family Reoviridae (4, 5). NIH_GOV - OCT 2013 - Chinese bats likely source of SARS virus, researchers report. Scientists say they've produced "the clearest evidence yet" the SARS virus originated in Chinese horseshoe bats and that direct bat-to-human transmission is "plausible.

NIH_GOV - OCT 2013 - Chinese bats likely source of SARS virus, researchers report

" The 2002 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) pandemic was one of the most significant public health events in recent history and researchers have been studying the virus to better understand how it is transmitted to prepare for future outbreaks. Photo by Dr. Libiao Zhang, Guangdong Entomological Institute /South China Institute of Endangered Animals Researchers say the Chinese horseshoe bat is likely the source of the 2002 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) pandemic. An international research team - with participants in China, Australia, Singapore and the U.S. - has published its results in the journal Nature.

SCIENCEMEDIACENTRE_CO_NZ 31/10/13 SARS may have originated in bats – experts respond. Two novel coronaviruses that are closely related to SARS have been found in Chinese horseshoe bats.

SCIENCEMEDIACENTRE_CO_NZ 31/10/13 SARS may have originated in bats – experts respond

The results of research, published today in Nature, provide the strongest evidence to date that the viruses responsible for the 2002–2003 SARS pandemic and the on-going Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus may have originated in bats. Our colleagues at the AusSMC collected the following expert commentary. Feel free to use these quotes in your reporting. If you would like to contact a New Zealand expert, please contact the SMC (04 499 5476; smc@sciencemediacentre.co.nz). Gary Crameri is Stream Leader for Emerging Zoonotic Disease at CSIRO’s Australian Animal Health Laboratory and an author of this research. “Our identification of these two new SARS-like coronaviruses from Chinese horseshoe bats is the key to resolving the continued speculation around bats as the origin of the SARS outbreaks. “This study in Nature is important.