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WSBTV 07/03/16 Biologists predict 95 percent decline in Georgia bats. By: Craig Lucie Updated: Share this with your friends!

WSBTV 07/03/16 Biologists predict 95 percent decline in Georgia bats

From Biologists predict 95 percent decline in Georgia ATLANTA - Georgia bats are dying off at an alarming rate, and that could have a big impact on what you pay at the grocery store. Channel 2’s Craig Lucie crawled into a North Georgia cave to see how a disease is impacting bats first hand. Biologists told Lucie that a fungus has caused possibly the worst wildlife decline in recorded history. "The declines have been pretty significant, and this site is no different," said biologist Trina Morris, with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. SCIENCE DAILY 23/12/16 Fungus-infecting virus could help track spread of white-nose syndrome in bats. A newly discovered virus infecting the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome in bats could help scientists and wildlife agencies track the spread of the disease that is decimating bat populations in the United States, a new study suggests.

SCIENCE DAILY 23/12/16 Fungus-infecting virus could help track spread of white-nose syndrome in bats

Regional variations in this virus could provide clues that would help researchers better understand the epidemiology of white-nose syndrome, according to Marilyn Roossinck, professor of plant pathology and environmental microbiology, College of Agricultural Sciences, Penn State. White-nose syndrome is a particularly lethal wildlife disease, killing an estimated 6 million bats in North America since it was identified in 2006. The disease, caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans, first was found in New York and now has spread to 29 states and four Canadian provinces. "But the virus it harbors has quite a bit of variation," she said. BBC 09/03/16 Asian bats show resistance to deadly white-nose syndrome.

Image copyright SPL Researchers have found new clues about the deadly white-nose syndrome, a disease that has wiped out millions of bats in North America.

BBC 09/03/16 Asian bats show resistance to deadly white-nose syndrome

A study found that bats in China showed strong resistance to the fungal infection responsible for the deaths. The fungus invades the skin of the bats and causes characteristic white markings on the face and wings. The scientists involved in the report say some American species may evolve the ability to fight the disease. White nose syndrome (WNS) is the name given to the bat disease caused by exposure to the fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans.

SCIENCE DAILY 25/10/13 Fungus that causes white-nose syndrome in bats proves hardy survivor. After taking an in-depth look at the basic biology of a fungus that is decimating bat colonies as it spreads across the U.S., researchers report that they can find little that might stop the organism from spreading further and persisting indefinitely in bat caves.

SCIENCE DAILY 25/10/13 Fungus that causes white-nose syndrome in bats proves hardy survivor

Their report appears in the journal PLOS ONE. CBS 05/08/14 Bats' future hangs in the balance as deadly disease spreads. Bats are dying across North America, with a loss of nearly 6 million since 2007.

CBS 05/08/14 Bats' future hangs in the balance as deadly disease spreads

Hibernia Mines was once the largest bat hibernation spot in New Jersey, where as many as 30,000 bats would spend their winters. But a recent count found fewer than 400 clinging to these cave walls, most dead from white-nose syndrome. Now, this spot and others are sealed off to the public as that disease and its devastation spreads west, CBS News correspondent Don Dahler reports.

Jackie Kashmer hand feeds little brown bats every day. "You're a good boy, Squeak. Since 2009, hundreds of bats have been brought to the bat sanctuary she runs in New Jersey. White-nose syndrome kills bats two ways: It destroys the fragile tissue of their wings, making it impossible to fly and to hunt insects, and it causes so much discomfort while they're hibernating that it wakes them up, burning precious calories and forcing them outside in the dead of winter, where they die of starvation. © 2014 CBS Interactive Inc. CAVING NEWS 05/05/11 White-Nose Syndrome Fungus Geomyces Destructans Likely Native to Europe. BBC 10/04/12 White-nose syndrome in bats continues to spread. 10 April 2012Last updated at 13:20 ET By Mark Kinver Environment reporter, BBC News Despite efforts to control white-nose syndrome, the disease is continuing to spread across the US A fungal disease that has killed more than 5.5 million bats is continuing to spread across North America.

BBC 10/04/12 White-nose syndrome in bats continues to spread

White-nose syndrome, first recorded in New York in 2006, is now present in 20 states and four Canadian provinces. Research just published provides further evidence that the disease is caused by the fungus, and that it originated in Europe. Last year, researchers and policymakers agreed on a national action plan in order to limit the disease's impact. "We now have 19 states that have confirmed the disease, and one additional state that has detected the fungus that causes the disease," explained Ann Froschauer from the US white-nose syndrome (WNS) co-ordination team at the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS).

AP 18/02/10 Bat fungus could cause more bugs, hurt crops"Bats, which can eat up to 1,200 mosquitoes an hour, protect crops from. USATODAY 26/06/12 Deadly white-nose syndrome attacks bats with no end in sight. A plague killing bats nationwide shows no sign of slowing, say biologists whose winter cave surveys indicate the "white-nose syndrome" that decimates bat populations is still spreading.

USATODAY 26/06/12 Deadly white-nose syndrome attacks bats with no end in sight

Starting from one cave in New York state in 2006, the fungal infection that preys on hibernating bats, has killed more than 5.5 million bats in 19 states. The bat deaths could cost farmers $3.7 billion in losses, biologists estimate, given the flying mammals eat insect crop pests, such as beetles, and pollinate plants. Until recently, most of the losses took place in Northeastern states and eastern Canadian provinces. But over the winter, the syndrome struck bats in Missouri, as far west as it has been documented, and in Alabama, as far south. Two weeks ago, wildlife officials announced that signs of the fungus had turned up in a cave in a new state: Iowa. "Epidemics are hard to predict, but we would certainly expect it to spread farther," says Jonathan Sleeman of the U.S.

In May, U.S. WASHINGTON POST 19/01/12 Nearly 7 million bats may have died from white-nose fungus, officials say. “We’re watching a potential extinction event on the order of what we experienced with bison and passenger pigeons for this group of mammals,” said Mylea Bayless, conservation programs manager for Bat Conservation International in Austin, Tex.

WASHINGTON POST 19/01/12 Nearly 7 million bats may have died from white-nose fungus, officials say

“The difference is we may be seeing the regional extinction of multiple species,” Bayless said. “Unlike some of the extinction events or population depletion events we’ve seen in the past, we’re looking at a whole group of animals here, not just one species. We don’t know what that means, but it could be catastrophic.” Bats are a top nocturnal predator, picking off night-flying insects that feed on agricultural crops and forests.

A reproductive female consumes her weight in bugs each night. White-nose syndrome is caused by an aggressive fungus called Geomyces destructans that eats through the skin and membranes of bats. Tuesday’s estimate of 5.7 million to 6.7 million dead bats dwarfed the previous count of slightly more than a million in 2009.