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Can suicide rates be reduced to zero? 12750. 12750. Stats and facts. Resource library » headspace. YMMHighlights. Child2. The Royal Women's Hospital. Adolescence is a time of complex change.

The Royal Women's Hospital

While this can make young people vulnerable to mental health issues, it is important to recognise that most young people get through adolescence without major difficulty. Rural and Remote Health Journal - View Article. Original Research Understanding barriers to mental health service utilization for adolescents in rural Australia Citation: Aisbett DL, Boyd CP, Francis KJ, Newnham K, Newnham K.

Rural and Remote Health Journal - View Article

Understanding barriers to mental health service utilization for adolescents in rural Australia . Rural and Remote Health (Internet) 2007; 7: 624. Available: (Accessed 29 February 2016) GetSharedSiteSession?rc=1&redirect= Figure 1 Mortality rates (per 100 000) due to maternal, communicable, non-communicable, and injury causes Mortality rates shown by sex, country classification, and age-group: 10–14 years (A), 15–19 years (B), and 20–24 years (C).

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Maternal=group IA. Communicable=group IB. Social and School Connectedness in Early Secondary School as Predictors of Late Teenage Substance Use, Mental Health, and Academic Outcomes. Original article a Centre for Adolescent Health, Royal Children’s Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne and Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, Australiab Key Centre for Women’s Health in Society, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australiac Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics Unit, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and University of Melbourne Department of Paediatrics, Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Australiad Department of Education and Training, Victoria, Australiae Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia Received 16 March 2006, Accepted 25 October 2006, Available online 5 February 2007 Choose an option to locate/access this article: Check if you have access through your login credentials or your institution Check access doi:10.1016/j.jadohealth.2006.10.013.

Social and School Connectedness in Early Secondary School as Predictors of Late Teenage Substance Use, Mental Health, and Academic Outcomes

An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie. This site uses cookies to improve performance. If your browser does not accept cookies, you cannot view this site. Setting Your Browser to Accept Cookies There are many reasons why a cookie could not be set correctly. Below are the most common reasons: You have cookies disabled in your browser. Why Does this Site Require Cookies? This site uses cookies to improve performance by remembering that you are logged in when you go from page to page. What Gets Stored in a Cookie? This site stores nothing other than an automatically generated session ID in the cookie; no other information is captured. In general, only the information that you provide, or the choices you make while visiting a web site, can be stored in a cookie. An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie. Perceived barriers and facilitators to mental health help-seeking in young people: a systematic review. The present review identified a range of perceived barriers and facilitators to help-seeking.

Perceived barriers and facilitators to mental health help-seeking in young people: a systematic review

However, it is clear from the present systematic review that there is a paucity of high quality research in the area, little emphasis on identifying facilitators, and a focus on qualitative rather than quantitative data collection. The following discussion considers the most prominent barrier and facilitator themes from the systematic review, defined as those with at least five or more barriers or facilitators in the qualitative thematic analysis, and places them in the context of previous reviews and related studies in the literature.

Prominent barrier themes. My Aged Care. Our research - Averting anxiety and depression in youth: Are prevention programs effective? - Latest findings - Research. Our research - The effects of risky alcohol use in younger people with developing bipolar disorder - Research finding - Research. The effects of risky alcohol use in younger people with developing bipolar disorder Alcohol misuse is a frequent feature of bipolar disorder, particularly in young people, where rates of up to 70% of lifetime misuse are reported.

Our research - The effects of risky alcohol use in younger people with developing bipolar disorder - Research finding - Research

Alcohol misuse and dependence in those with bipolar disorder are associated with worse course of illness and may also be risk factors to both the onset of mania and to ‘rapid cycling’ (defined as four or more distinct episodes of depression and hypo/mania a year). Excess alcohol consumption damages our body via the increased formation of ‘free radicals’… particular molecules that cause a phenomenon called ‘oxidative stress’.

In particular the accumulation of a specific type of free radical called reactive oxygen species (or ROS) is known to damage DNA, RNA and proteins, the building blocks of the body. Glutathione (GSH) helps repair this damage. What was the aim of the study? Our research - Can we predict the boys who are at higher risk of depression? - Research finding - Research. Can we predict the boys who are at higher risk of depression?

Our research - Can we predict the boys who are at higher risk of depression? - Research finding - Research

Around one in seven Australians will suffer from clinical depression, a severe illness that affects mood and thinking (‘cognition’) and causes significant impairment in everyday living. Identifying groups at higher risk of depression would be of great benefit but present diagnostic classification, which tends to lump together disorders that look similar but that have different causes, hampers this endeavour. Our research - Research findings - Research. Preventing depression in adolescents at risk The first onset of depressive disorder often occurs in adolescence, impacting on social and educational success and increasing the risk of self-harm.

Our research - Research findings - Research

Adolescence is also a key time for intervention, with effective programs that focus on preventing depression – rather than reducing the symptoms of depression after they have developed. As adolescent offspring of depressed parents are at particularly high risk for developing depressive disorders themselves, this group is very relevant to study when testing the effectiveness of prevention programs. What was the aim of the study? How did they do it? The participants were 316 adolescents aged 13-17 years. The adolescents were then randomly assigned to either 8 weekly 90-minute group sessions followed by 6 monthly continuation sessions or to 'usual care'. Our research - Research findings - Research. Can e-health cover the gaps in adolescent mental health services?

Our research - Research findings - Research

Some depressive and anxiety disorders have their onset in adolescence – community samples find that up to 30 per cent of young people experience depressive symptoms. Early intervention at symptom onset, providing information and coping strategies, has been found to reduce symptoms and enhance self-efficacy. For some young people, symptoms may presage further difficulties; nearly three-quarters of mental illness emerges before the age of 25. Here again, early intervention is critical to prevent chronic impairment. Our research - Research findings - Research. Some responses to maintaining fitness and wellbeing Recent research suggests that we're 'hardwired' to eat more than we need.1 It's thought that humans evolved to eat high-energy foods and limit physical effort in order to survive periods of food scarcity.

Our research - Research findings - Research

Food manufacturers have piggybacked on such evolutionary urges and load flavoursome fats and sugars into their readily available products.