Politics and Human Rights in China

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Crazy Things Happening In China Crazy Things Happening In China China's rapid economic growth rate has helped create problems that are very unique to China. Its emphasis on speed over safety, poor environmental track record, use of substandard construction materials, harsh regulations, and the propaganda aimed at protecting the image of the Communist party, are all part of the problem. Couples are getting divorced to avoid taxes, buildings and bridges have collapsed, and dead pigs are floating around in rivers.
5 Things the Pentagon Isn't Telling Us About the Chinese Military - By Trefor Moss Think of it like an iceberg: The top lies in plain sight, but a lot more hides beneath the surface. In its annual appraisal of the Chinese military published last week, the U.S. Department of Defense seems to be describing an object it finds both familiar and mysterious. 5 Things the Pentagon Isn't Telling Us About the Chinese Military - By Trefor Moss
Xi Jinping: Can the pop star's husband brought up in a cave keep a lid on China's tinderbox? By Michael Burleigh PUBLISHED: 02:09 GMT, 19 November 2012 | UPDATED: 16:52 GMT, 19 November 2012 Weighed down and shamed by the heavy placard hanging round his neck, the middle-aged man was paraded before a jeering crowd of thousands who had gathered in a sports stadium in Beijing. Xi Jinping: Can the pop star's husband brought up in a cave keep a lid on China's tinderbox?
China lands fighter jet on its first aircraft carrier as it takes another leap towards becoming Asian naval power China lands fighter jet on its first aircraft carrier as it takes another leap towards becoming Asian naval power China successfully landed a J-15 fighter jet on its Liaoning aircraft carrier while the ship was at seaLanding exercise marked the debut of the jet, a fighter bomber capable of carrying missiles and precision-guided bombs By Kerry Mcdermott PUBLISHED: 18:00 GMT, 25 November 2012 | UPDATED: 08:10 GMT, 26 November 2012 China has taken a major step towards achieving its ambition of becoming a leading naval power after successfully landing a fighter jet on an aircraft carrier for the first time. The People's Liberation Army (PLA) Navy landed a J-15 fighter jet - capable of carrying missiles and precision-guided bombs - on its Liaoning aircraft carrier while the ship was out at sea.
Xie Jinghua and her husband were among five people who claim they were held against their will at the Holiday Inn Express in Nanhuizui, near ShanghaiThey were allegedly snatched on their way to complain after their homes were demolished to make way for Shanghai's Pudong International AirportTheir plan was to hand in a petition to the10-day annual meeting of China's legislature in MarchXie claims she was held for eight days under 24-hour guardWhen she tried to escape she was caught by seven guards and tied to bedIHG, who own Holiday Inn, says 'no indication' rooms were used as prisonsCampaigners say unofficial detentions in 'black jails' are rising in China By Matt Blake PUBLISHED: 13:48 GMT, 14 November 2012 | UPDATED: 17:18 GMT, 14 November 2012 A Holiday Inn in China is being used as a 'black jail' for people who dare to complain about life under the Communist regime, it has been claimed. The Chinese Holiday Inn which is 'being used as a black jail' to hold citizens who dare complain about life under Communism The Chinese Holiday Inn which is 'being used as a black jail' to hold citizens who dare complain about life under Communism
Chinese Dissidence From Tiananmen to Today On June 5, 1989, the day after the bloody crackdown on protesters in Tiananmen Square, Fang Lizhi, a prominent astrophysicist, and his wife, Li Shuxian, sought refuge in the U.S. embassy in Beijing. Fang, an intellectual and a strong proponent of democracy and human rights, and his wife were at the top of the Chinese government's wanted list. Fang was accused of being one of the "black hands" behind the student demonstrations. For more than a year, he and Li lived in the basement of the U.S. embassy while, outside, the Chinese authorities tracked down, detained, and imprisoned others suspected of so-called "counterrevolutionary crimes." In June 1990, they were allowed to leave China for the United States, where they lived in exile for the next 22 years. Chinese Dissidence From Tiananmen to Today
As the U.S. Presidential election campaign enters its final stages, both candidates are being criticized in the media for "bashing" China. This is in response to Obama administration filings of anti-subsidy complaints against China with the World Trade Organization (WTO) and to Governor Romney's strong criticism of Beijing's currency manipulation that undervalues its yuan (or RMB) as a way of subsidizing exports and acting as a tariff on imports. The best example is the Chicago Tribune. Recently, it flatly said that both candidates are "bashing" China and noted that "attacking China's export-subsidy machine is guaranteed to win applause at campaign stops in Ohio and other Midwest industrial swing states, where resentment of Chinese competition in manufacturing runs deep." It's not 'China bashing' if it's true! It's not 'China bashing' if it's true!
Bachelor Padding - By Roseann Lake For more photos of Beijing's housing bubble, click here. BEIJING — When Xiaobo Zhang got married in the early 1990s, he and his bride, like millions of other couples across China, were given a small room to live in by his danwei, or work unit. At the time a lecturer at Nankai University in Tianjin, Zhang's room was utilitarian and unremarkable, virtually indistinguishable from the ones inhabited by his colleagues. In a word: average. In the China of the 1990s, which was characterized by a pubescent limbo between the economic reforms of the 1980s and the last decade's explosive growth, Zhang recalls that mostly everyone was average. People were neatly packed into work units, generally laboring under the same conditions, eating in the same canteens, and sleeping in the same blocks of industrial-looking housing provided by their employers. Bachelor Padding - By Roseann Lake
A government official, meanwhile, held his nose and tasted his father's stool to check for symptoms of illness, while another woman used her breast milk to feed her toothless great grandmother. The modern version, however, is more prosaic. "Teach your mother and father how to use the internet," it offers. China updates 600-year-old guide to respecting parents China updates 600-year-old guide to respecting parents
China's 'great revival' is 62 per cent finished
China: Population & the One Child Policy

Chinese Pollution & Environmental Problems

China in Africa

China: People in the News

China: Industry & Workers

China: Architecture & Construction

China v Japan: The Battle for the Senkaku Islands

Chinese Economy

China arrests top security official on suspicion of spying for U.S. in 'greatest breach of state intelligence for two decades' China arrests top security official on suspicion of spying for U.S. in 'greatest breach of state intelligence for two decades' By Daily Mail Reporter Published: 14:46 GMT, 1 June 2012 | Updated: 14:46 GMT, 1 June 2012 A top Chinese state security official has been arrested on suspicion of spying for the U.S., sources have claimed. It is a case both countries have kept quiet for several months as they strive to prevent a fresh crisis in relations. The official, an aide to a vice minister in China's security ministry, was arrested and detained early this year on allegations he had passed information to the U.S. for several years. Detained: A top Chinese state security official has been arrested on suspicion of spying for the U.S., sources have claimed (file picture)
Two men suspected of trying to hijack a flight in China were beaten to death by passengers By Amy Oliver PUBLISHED: 15:01 GMT, 2 July 2012 | UPDATED: 12:06 GMT, 4 July 2012 Two men who allegedly tried to hijack a plane in China were beaten to death by passengers and crew, state media said today.