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Mr. Guch Explains I have good news and bad news. The bad news is that I'm not going to add to the list below anymore because it's a pain to get everything formatted for the Interwebs. The good news is that I'm going to start adding new questions in blog format over at http://misterguchquestions.wordpress.com/ . Check it out, and email me any questions you've got at misterguch@chemfiesta.com . Mr. Guch Explains -- A Guch-a-riffic chemistry tutorial! Mr. Guch Explains -- A Guch-a-riffic chemistry tutorial!
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Why Nikola Tesla was the greatest geek who ever lived - The Oatmeal
Physics Flash Animations Physics Flash Animations We have been increasingly using Flash animations for illustrating Physics content. This page provides access to those animations which may be of general interest. The animations will appear in a separate window. The animations are sorted by category, and the file size of each animation is included in the listing. Also included is the minimum version of the Flash player that is required; the player is available free from http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/.
Scientists were today able to dispel the age-old belief that no two snowflakes are the same, using state of the art microscopy and by catching flakes as they fell in specially designed equipment while sitting at a table outside a pub in Norwich. The team of researchers, backed by a £20m grant, were able to make an identical match to the famous Bentley flake, photographed 47 years ago by amateur snowflakeologist Wilson Bentley. ‘It’s one of the last remaining challenges known to science and we’ve cracked it at last,’ said lead researcher, Professor Kenneth Libbrecht. Scientists discover snowflake identical to one which fell in 1963 Scientists discover snowflake identical to one which fell in 1963
Tags: bosón de HiggsPeter Higgs Pues sí. Resulta que existe. Con un 99,999999 % de probabilidad. El bosón de Higgs: La “partícula de Dios” sí existe (y lo que eso significa) El bosón de Higgs: La “partícula de Dios” sí existe (y lo que eso significa)
Rocks and Weathering
Bueno, pues aquí lo tenéis. Después de muchos días de trabajo y gracias al talento de David Tesouro (animación y la parte más importante del curro), Miguel Fernández Flores (grafismo) y Nicola Zonno (ilustraciones), estrenamos nuestro primer videográfico de ciencia en lainformacion.com. Después del éxito de "El bosón de Higgs explicado a mi abuela", queríamos hacer algo en nuevos formatos y nos pusimos a ello. Tres minutos para entender el bosón de Higgs Tres minutos para entender el bosón de Higgs
The cosmos loves irony. While trying to prove that the Earth is fixed in space, an Italian priest described something similar to the Coriolis effect – the slight deflection experienced by objects moving in a rotating frame of reference – nearly 200 years before mathematician Gustave Coriolis worked it out in 1835. In 1651, Giovanni Riccioli published 77 arguments against the idea that the apparent motions of the heavens were due to the Earth's rotation and orbit around the sun. These included claims that Hell would be in the wrong place, aesthetic concerns over proportion and harmony, and more scientific approaches. Now, Christopher Graney at Jefferson Community and Technical College in Louisville, Kentucky, has translated them from Latin, and discovered that Riccioli conjectured phenomena resembling the Coriolis effect (arxiv.org/abs/1012.3642). Coriolis-like effect found 184 years before Coriolis - physics-math - 14 January 2011 Coriolis-like effect found 184 years before Coriolis - physics-math - 14 January 2011
Laser Crosswalk Saves Pedestrians From a Painful Death
CERN: Light Speed May Have Been Exceeded By Subatomic Particle GENEVA — One of the very pillars of physics and Einstein's theory of relativity – that nothing can go faster than the speed of light – was rocked Thursday by new findings from one of the world's foremost laboratories. European researchers said they clocked an oddball type of subatomic particle called a neutrino going faster than the 186,282 miles per second that has long been considered the cosmic speed limit. The claim was met with skepticism, with one outside physicist calling it the equivalent of saying you have a flying carpet. In fact, the researchers themselves are not ready to proclaim a discovery and are asking other physicists to independently try to verify their findings. "The feeling that most people have is this can't be right, this can't be real," said James Gillies, a spokesman for the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, which provided the particle accelerator that sent neutrinos on their breakneck 454-mile trip underground from Geneva to Italy. CERN: Light Speed May Have Been Exceeded By Subatomic Particle
Demonic device converts information to energy
La historia del Bosón de Higgs
Una nueva partícula, quizás el bosón de Higgs, se filtra antes de tiempo "Hemos observado una nueva partícula... Tenemos fuerte evidencia de que hay algo ahí", dice Joe Incandela, el portavoz de CMS, uno de los grandes detectores del acelerador de partículas LHC, en un vídeo que se ha hecho público, seguramente por error, antes de tiempo, ya que se ha retirado inmediatamente del acceso público, según ha informado Science News. La presentación de los últimos datos del LHC, que se espera que signifiquen el descubrimiento de la muy buscada partícula de Higgs, o el casi descubrimiento, está prevista para este miércoles por la mañana en el Laboratorio Europeo de Física de Partículas (CERN), junto a Ginebra. Mientras los físicos ultiman los análisis de los datos, los nervios parece que han jugado una mala pasada a los responsables de preparar la información pública con la filtración indebida de este vídeo. Una nueva partícula, quizás el bosón de Higgs, se filtra antes de tiempo
HyperPhysics
Michio Kaku - Smashing Atoms
Sunshine
World’s Most Precise Clocks Could Reveal Universe Is a Hologram | Wired Science Our existence could be coded in a finite bandwidth, like a live ultra-high-definition 3-D video. And the third dimension we know and love could be no more than a holographic projection of a 2-D surface. A scientist’s $1 million experiment, now under construction in Illinois, will attempt to test these ideas by the end of next year using what will be two of the world’s most precise clocks. Skeptics of a positive result abound, but their caution comes with good reason: The smallest pieces of space, time, mass and other properties of the universe, called Planck units, are so tiny that verifying them by experiment may be impossible. World’s Most Precise Clocks Could Reveal Universe Is a Hologram | Wired Science
Lasers illuminate quantum security loophole : Nature News
Demonic device converts information to energy
Quantum Computing: Will It Be a Leap in Human Evolution? (Today's Most Popular) Quantum computers have the potential to solve problems that would take a classical computer longer than the age of the universe. Oxford Professor David Deutsch, quantum-computing pioneer, who wrote in his controversial masterpiece, Fabric of Reality says: "quantum computers can efficiently render every physically possible quantum environment, even when vast numbers of universes are interacting. Quantum computers can also efficiently solve certain mathematical problems, such as factorization, which are classically intractable, and can implement types of cryptography which are classically impossible. Quantum computation is a qualitatively new way of harnessing nature." Quantum Computing: Will It Be a Leap in Human Evolution? (Today's Most Popular)
The Higgs Boson explained by PhD Comics
Higgs Found Finally, physics’s zoo of subatomic particles is full. Scientists have almost certainly snared the Higgs boson, the last particle waiting to be roped into the fold. Decades after it was proposed, the Higgs emerged in the shards of particle collisions at the world’s most powerful accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider at the CERN laboratory near Geneva.
Higgs boson: What's it for? I have no idea, says Prof
Laws of physics vary throughout the universe, new study suggests A team of astrophysicists based in Australia and England has uncovered evidence that the laws of physics are different in different parts of the universe. The team -- from the University of New South Wales, Swinburne University of Technology and the University of Cambridge -- has submitted a report of the discovery for publication in the journal Physical Review Letters. A preliminary version of the paper is currently under peer review. The report describes how one of the supposed fundamental constants of Nature appears not to be constant after all. Instead, this 'magic number' known as the fine-structure constant -- 'alpha' for short -- appears to vary throughout the universe.
Electricity
Stuff under an electron microscope
Arranca la búsqueda de la 'partícula Dios' La sala de reuniones del partido tory está llena de militantes que charlan tranquilamente cuando, de pronto, la señora Thatcher entra por la puerta. A medida que Thatcher camina por la habitación, los militantes más cercanos forman corrillos a su alrededor y, en consecuencia, dificultan el movimiento de su líder. Los militantes representan el campo de Higgs, una forma de energía que impregna todo el espacio y confiere masa a las partículas (como Thatcher). Un protón, por ejemplo, no tendría masa si no fuera por el campo de Higgs. Sin ese campo misterioso, todos seríamos livianos como el fotón, y nos moveríamos, como él, a la velocidad de la luz. La anterior parábola, debida al físico británico David Miller, es un pequeño clásico de la divulgación científica.
Guide to Snowflakes
The Official String Theory Web Site
Mind blowing physics engine demonstration
Serious Flaw Emerges In Quantum Cryptography
New kind of light created in physics breakthrough
Titanium foam could make your bones as strong as Wolverine's
9 Things You Didn't Know About Benjamin Franklin