Bioethics

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Late-term abortion and fetal development: My debate with Ann Furedi. Photograph by David McNew/Getty Images.

Late-term abortion and fetal development: My debate with Ann Furedi

A month ago, I debated late-term abortion with Ann Furedi, the chief executive of BPAS (the British Pregnancy Advisory Service), at the Battle of Ideas in London. Arizona decrees pregnancy starts before conception - health - 20 April 2012. On 12 April, the governor of Arizona approved a bill banning most abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy.

Arizona decrees pregnancy starts before conception - health - 20 April 2012

However, the bill marks pregnancy as beginning two weeks before a child has been conceived. After-Birth Abortion: The pro-choice case for infanticide. ABORTION, INFANTICIDE, HUMANITY, FREE SPEECH. Is there no moral distinction between killing a newborn baby and aborting a fetus?

ABORTION, INFANTICIDE, HUMANITY, FREE SPEECH

And should an academic paper that seemingly advocated the killing of newborns have ever been published? Those are the questions at the heart of a controversy that has erupted after the publication of a paper entitled ‘After-birth abortion: Why should the baby live?’ In the Journal of Medical Ethics. Unnatural selection: Is evolving reproductive technology ushering in a new age of eugenics? Sex-selection, abortion, and the pro-choice movement: Why liberals shouldn't gulp. Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images What’s a not-OK reason to get an abortion?

Sex-selection, abortion, and the pro-choice movement: Why liberals shouldn't gulp

Rape and health of the mother, you’re cool with, yes? What about this nice Jewish girl who got one in college? Noninvasive prenatal diagnostic tests, ethics, abortion, and insurance coverage. Photograph by Comstock.

Noninvasive prenatal diagnostic tests, ethics, abortion, and insurance coverage

In 2003, back when such things remained unpredictable, a woman gave birth to a baby boy with Down syndrome. Her family was shocked. Group blogs: Journal of Medical Ethics blog » Blog Archive » Treating the Sex Offender. 13 Jun, 12 | by Iain Brassington This is an interesting story picked up by the BBC: drugs are being used to “suppress sexual thoughts and urges” among sex offenders in an experiment at HMP Whatton.

Group blogs: Journal of Medical Ethics blog » Blog Archive » Treating the Sex Offender

It is early days, and the number taking part is small – so far fewer than 60 – but the graphs illustrating such measures as prisoners’ strength of sexual urges, or time spent thinking about sex, all show a downward trend.The Ministry of Justice is pleased with the initial evaluation of the scheme. The treatment will continue to be available to high-risk sex offenders who are assessed as being suitable, it says. There’s all manner of questions raised by the prospect of using drugs to alter, reduce, or otherwise manipulate sex drive. At the same time, there might be questions about the moral difference between having a certain sexual fantasy in the privacy of your own head, and acting it out. A Death of One’s Own - Peter Singer.

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A Death of One’s Own - Peter Singer

Click to hide this space. John Stuart Mill and the Right to Die. The consistency of individual autonomy, as Mill outlined, indicates that just as we can live as we wish (with certain constraints), we ought to be able to die as we wish, too.

John Stuart Mill and the Right to Die

Today is human rights day in South Africa. This piece seems to me appropriate, given that I think the right to die should be the next step in universal human rights. A British man, Tony Nicklinson, wants to die. Brendan O’Neill - Why society should never institutionalise a "right to die" On 24 April 2012, I gave a speech at St Michael’s Hospice in Yorkshire arguing against the “right to die”.

Brendan O’Neill - Why society should never institutionalise a "right to die"

The speech is published below. Over the past month, there have been two interesting and seemingly unrelated news stories about old people – two media stories about pensioners which seem to be quite distinct, but which I think are linked in quite subtle and important ways. The first news story was about the alleged problem of pensioners using up too many of society’s resources. Too Impaired to Rock and Roll - Time to Die? Lynne Bowyer and Grant Gillett on the Tony Nicklinson case - The Bioethics Centre Blog. A Life Worth Ending. Molecules to Medicine: When Religion Collides with Medical Care: Who Decides What Is Right for You?

San Carlos Church - Vince Alongi The recent presidential candidate debates, fights over insurance coverage for contraceptives, and the Virginia and Texas legislatures’ imposition of intrusive, unnecessary ultrasounds prior to any abortions are highlighting the fundamental issue of the role of religion in health care and the separation of Church and State.

Molecules to Medicine: When Religion Collides with Medical Care: Who Decides What Is Right for You?

While the emphasis has been on reproductive care, the imposition of religious beliefs on access to medical care is far more wide reaching in its deleterious effect on the ability of people to choose their care and have their medical needs met. Sinnott-Armstrong and Miller. + Author Affiliations Correspondence to Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Kenan Institute for Ethics, Duke University, Box 90432, Durham, NC 27708, USA; ws66@duke.edu Received 2 November 2011 Revised 13 December 2011 Accepted 16 December 2011 Published Online First 19 January 2012. Controversial cyborg rat tests target brain treatments.

17 January 2012Last updated at 00:00 ET By Katia Moskvitch Technology reporter, BBC News. More Than Human? The Ethics of Biologically Enhancing Soldiers - Patrick Lin - Technology. Our ability to "upgrade" the bodies of soldiers through drugs, implants, and exoskeletons may be upending the ethical norms of war as we've understood them. If we can engineer a soldier who can resist torture, would it still be wrong to torture this person with the usual methods? Starvation and sleep deprivation won't affect a super-soldier who doesn't need to sleep or eat. Alex Byrne: Cheating Death. Star Trek–style teleportation may one day become a reality. The Case for Enhancing People.

Bioconservatives vs. Bioprogressives. Should We Want To Be Immortal? When I was five, I almost died. I remember the event well. Should we erase painful memories? The ethics of brain boosting. The idea of a simple, cheap and widely available device that could boost brain function sounds too good to be true. Yet promising results in the lab with emerging ‘brain stimulation’ techniques, though still very preliminary, have prompted Oxford neuroscientists to team up with leading ethicists at the University to consider the issues the new technology could raise. They spoke to Radio 4's Today programme this morning. Recent research in Oxford and elsewhere has shown that one type of brain stimulation in particular, called transcranial direct current stimulation or TDCS, can be used to improve language and maths abilities, memory, problem solving, attention, even movement.

"Biomedicine’s Democratic Revolution" by Stephen H Friend. Exit from comment view mode. Motherhood: Immaculate gestation. 'Three-parent babies' cure for illness raises ethical fear. Do You Really Want to Live Forever? Imagine you are offered a trustworthy opportunity for immortality in which your mind (perhaps also your body) will persist eternally. Let’s further stipulate that the offer includes perpetual youthful health and the ability to upgrade to any cognitive and physical technologies that become available in the future.

The Population Control Holocaust. Procreation vs. Overpopulation. Regulations proposed for animal–human chimaeras. The Two-Minus-One Pregnancy. Eating Animals - Nicolette Hahn Niman - Health. Europe’s Ethical Eggs - Peter Singer.