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Jung & MBTI

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Nothing Personal: The questionable Myers-Briggs test. I was recently reviewing some psychological lectures for my real job.

Nothing Personal: The questionable Myers-Briggs test

One of these was on personality tests. The speaker mentioned the Myers-Briggs test, explaining that, while well known (I personally know it from a Dilbert cartoon) the Myers-Briggs test isn't recognised as being scientifically valid so is largely ignored by the field of psychology. I tweeted this fact, thinking it would be of passing interest to a few people. I was unprepared for the intensity of the replies I got. I learned several things that day. 1. 2. 3. So how did something that apparently lacks scientific credibility become such a popular and accepted tool? The MBTI was developed during World War 2 by Myers and Briggs (obviously), two housewives who developed a keen interest in the works of Carl Jung. This is already enough to make some people wary. The trouble is, the more you look into the specifics of the MBTI, the more questionable the way it's widespread use appears to be. But so what? Have we all been duped by the Myers-Briggs test? FORTUNE — When Frank Parsons opened the world’s first career guidance center in Boston in 1908, he began by asking prospective clients 116 penetrating questions about their ambitions, strengths, and weaknesses (and how often they bathed).

Have we all been duped by the Myers-Briggs test?

But then he did something more unusual: He measured their skulls. Parsons was a committed believer in phrenology. If you had a large forehead, he might recommend you become a lawyer or engineer. But if your skull was more developed behind the ears, you were of the “animal type” and best suited to manual work. Career advice has, thankfully, come a long way since then. MORE: The epic inside story of fraud at a generic Lipitor giant I have some bad news for you: Even the most sophisticated tests have considerable flaws. The interesting — and somewhat alarming — fact about the MBTI is that, despite its popularity, it has been subject to sustained criticism by professional psychologists for over three decades.

Does the Myers-Briggs personality assessment really tell you anything? February 12, 2010 Dear Cecil: My question is about the Myers-Briggs personality assessment.

Does the Myers-Briggs personality assessment really tell you anything?

Is it just an example of modern-day snake oil sold by corporate soothsayers? Or does it really work? Certainly a huge industry has built up around this test. Personality test based on C. Jung and I. Briggs Myers type theory. MBTI Critique. Jung's Archetypes. The Archetypal Patterns The Nature of the Archetypes Dreams and myths are constellations of archetypal images.

Jung's Archetypes

They are not free compositions by an artist who plans them for artistic or informational effects. Dreams and myths happen to human beings. The archetype speaks through us. Jung Types Test. This is an interactive personality test using Carl Jungs's system of personality types as extended upon by Isabella Myers-Briggs.

Jung Types Test

The result you will receive will be similar to Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, of which this site has no affiliation. Introduction Carl Jung (1875-1961) was Swiss psychiatrist who proposed a theory of psychological types. His theory was taken and extended by Katharine Briggs and her daughter, Isabel Myers, personality enthusiasts who had studied his work extensively. They developed the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator which classified people into 16 different types on the basis of four dichotomies: Introversion-Extroversion, Sensing-Intuition, Thinking-Feeling, and Judging-Perceiving. The first three were adapted from Jung and the last developed by Myers-Briggs. MBTI Information. How to use Jung's Word Association Test by Robert Winer, M.D. Neurology, Psychiatry, Psychopharmacology, Neuropsychiatry, and Psychotherapy.

How to use Jung's Word Association Test (2002) by Robert I.

How to use Jung's Word Association Test by Robert Winer, M.D. Neurology, Psychiatry, Psychopharmacology, Neuropsychiatry, and Psychotherapy

Winer, M.D. One of Jung's first English language papers on the subject is taken from his lecture notes from an address given at the Clark University in Massachusetts in September, 1909. The lecture has been re-published in numerous books. In the lecture, Jung presents his method of using 100 words to identify abnormal patterns of response as a means to identify psychological complexes, along with what he calls "intellectual and emotional deficiencies. " I follow, with some modifications, the original method as described by Jung. My Method My philosophy here is that the clinician wants a test that's relatively quick, easy-to-do, and reproducible across patients. To link to the form that I use for the test, click here.