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Fukushima disaster: Radiation levels posing cancer risks on fourth anniversary of earthquake. By North Asia correspondent Matthew Carney Updated Four years ago today Japan was hit with a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and massive tsunami that caused widespread destruction, leaving almost 22,000 people dead or missing and triggering a crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.

Fukushima disaster: Radiation levels posing cancer risks on fourth anniversary of earthquake

The triple nuclear meltdown was the world's worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl. About 120,000 people still cannot return their homes because of high radiation levels, but the issue of long-term health implications like cancer are causing the greatest concern and controversy in Japan. Before the disaster, there was just one to two cases of thyroid cancers in a million Japanese children but now Fukushima has more than 100 confirmed or suspected cases, having tested about 300,000 children. Megumi Muto's daughter Nana has undergone scans to determine if the lumps in her thyroid glands have grown. "I feel angry. Engineer says Fukushima cancer spike needs to be investigated "It's more expensive so I'm stuck here. " The displaced visit former lives - 2 clicks. A woman poses inside a laundromat destroyed by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.Carlos Ayesta & Guillaume Bression.

the displaced visit former lives - 2 clicks

Then now photos disaster Japan - 2 clicks. We can't see inside Fukushima Daiichi because all our robots keep dying - ExtremeTech. Tepco, the utility company tasked with overseeing cleanup and waste processing for the former Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, hit another snag this week.

We can't see inside Fukushima Daiichi because all our robots keep dying - ExtremeTech

Last month, we reported on new findings about Reactor #2 that showed it was far more radioactive inside than previously measured. At the time, we noted that Tepco was working on a new robot that could handle up to 73 sieverts of radiation, but the measured level of 530 sieverts vastly exceeded that tolerance. Now, Tepco has admitted that repeated robot failure is hampering its plan to search the bottom of the reactor, and find the estimated 600 tons of fuel and debris that may have poured out of the reactor and into the concrete lining below it.

Initial attempts to see into Reactor #2 via robotic probe have all failed. Japan’s $320 Million Gamble at Fukushima: An Underground Ice Wall. FUKUSHIMA DAIICHI NUCLEAR POWER STATION — The part above ground doesn’t look like much, a few silver pipes running in a straight line, dwarfed by the far more massive, scarred reactor buildings nearby.

Japan’s $320 Million Gamble at Fukushima: An Underground Ice Wall

More impressive is what is taking shape unseen beneath: an underground wall of frozen dirt 100 feet deep and nearly a mile in length, intended to solve a runaway water crisis threatening the devastated Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in . Officially named the Land-Side Impermeable Wall, but better known simply as the ice wall, the project sounds like a fanciful idea from science fiction or a James Bond film.

But it is about to become a reality in an ambitious, and controversial, bid to halt an unrelenting flood of groundwater into the damaged reactor buildings since the disaster five years ago when an earthquake and a tsunami caused a triple meltdown. However, the ice wall has also been widely criticized as an expensive and overly complex solution that may not even work. Photo. Japan Earthquake & Tsunami of 2011: Facts and Information. On March 11, 2011, a magnitude-9 earthquake shook northeastern Japan, unleashing a savage tsunami.

Japan Earthquake & Tsunami of 2011: Facts and Information

The effects of the great earthquake were felt around the world, from Norway's fjords to Antarctica's ice sheet. Tsunami debris continues to wash up on North American beaches two years later. Fukushima: Five years after nuclear disaster. PHOTOS: Rescuers Search For Survivors After Powerful Quakes Hit Southern Japan. Rescue dogs are brought in for the searching operation on Saturday in Mashiki, Kumamoto, Japan.

PHOTOS: Rescuers Search For Survivors After Powerful Quakes Hit Southern Japan

The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun/Getty Images Rescue dogs are brought in for the searching operation on Saturday in Mashiki, Kumamoto, Japan. The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun/Getty Images After two powerful quakes rocked the island of Kyushu in southern Japan barely a day apart, rescuers are racing to find survivors as aftershocks continue to shake the area. The death toll stands at 41, according to Japanese public broadcaster NHK, and some 2,000 were treated in hospitals for their injuries.

A researcher examines the gap Saturday caused by series of earthquakes in Mashiki, Kumamoto, Japan. At least 90 homes were "completely destroyed," NHK reported. NPR's Elise Hu updated our Newcast unit on the rescue efforts: Evacuees at an evacuation center on Saturday in Mashiki, Kumamoto, Japan. A short History of Earthquakes in Japan. Japan is situated in the collision zone of at least four lithospheric plates: the Eurasian/Chinese Plate, the North American Plate, the Philippine Plate and the Pacific Plate.

A short History of Earthquakes in Japan

The continuous movements of these plates generate a lot of energy released from time to time in earthquakes and tsunamis of varying magnitude and effects (Geologist Callan Bentley discusses in great detail the geological setting of the Japanese Islands). Written records of strong earthquakes date back at least 1.600 years. Until 1860 however Japanese naturalists were less interested in exploring the cause of earthquakes than the effects of such an extraordinary event and mythical explanations prevailed. The Great Japan Earthquake of 1923 2 clicks. Earthquake on Kyushu island, Japan – in pictures.